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1890 SUPER, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL OF A 3 WEEK CRUISE ON A 'MONKEY BOAT' THROUGH SOUTHERN ENGLAND'S SADLY DECLINING INLAND WATERWAYS AND CANAL SYSTEM AS RAILROADS BEGIN TO OVERTAKE BOATING, "RUTLAND BLEIGN" (?)
1 "RUTLAND BLEIGN" (?) 1890 SUPER, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL OF A 3 WEEK CRUISE ON A 'MONKEY BOAT' THROUGH SOUTHERN ENGLAND'S SADLY DECLINING INLAND WATERWAYS AND CANAL SYSTEM AS RAILROADS BEGIN TO OVERTAKE BOATING
SOUTHERN ENGLAND GREAT BRITAIN 1890 Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a super, original manuscript relic of travel through England on its inland waterways and canals as handwritten by the intrepid author "Rutland Bleign" [but really unidentified as it seems a pseudonym] who is travelling with his friend and illustrator, the brace working to publish the as titled book: "In Tow: The Chronicle of a Cruise in a Monkey Boat." Written from August 6th through the 28th in 1890 [he leaves off the year but some sleuthing concluded definitely the year as stated] the manuscript which appears unpublished details the three week cruise on the historic canals of Southern England at the perfect time for historians and researchers of canal travel as in 1890 while some were in peak years of usage while others beginning to see the inevitable decline due to increased railway service. Rutland is an erudite, witty raconteur in this travel account. Here are some snippets: "... after a ramble round the town, I took our permit to the Canal Office to be initialled in due form, and had a chat with the agent Mr. White... returning to our boat... I found a very serious gentleman with a pencil and notebook in hand... announced himself as the Canal-Boat-Inspector-for-the-Newbury-District-under-the- Local-Government-Board... he wanted to know how much women, children, and other livestock were onboard... if any of us were subject to hydrophobia, Asiatic cholera, smallpox or other little ailments of that sort... the blue books had already told me; but then as its owners the G.W.R. [Great Western Railway] get the traffic which it would otherwise take, it seems to be merely a transference from one pocket to the other. No doubt the Railway people would close the Cut tomorrow if their powers allowed them, which fortunately for us easy-going folk who infinitely prefer their water- to their iron-way, is not the case..." "The canal closing Sunday rule is absolutely stringent, it appears, and even a party of G.W.R. officials [Great Western Railway] who came down the canal for a weekend 'trip' were not allowed to infringe it. As the pleasure traffic begins to feel its way along these hitherto almost unknown waters, this regulation will naturally become more & more irksome, and will probably be relaxed eventually..." "....Melksham... the sunny old Quaker town... the grand old Quaker enterprise and grit which made the place, had largely disappeared, but Sir Robert Fowler still is there, and the methodist connextion is evidently strong..." "... beyond a square orchard with some lumps in the turf... Stanley Abbey... our host insisted on our partaking in some home brewed wine (vintage '86, Chateau Rhubarb Beds) of subtle flavour and half inclined to be sparkling." "We begin to expect great things of 'New Swindon,' and may, after all, have to spend more than the inevitable 'ten minutes for refreshment' which begins and ends most peoples acquaintance with the place; and which must have brought a fortune to the far seeing contractor who stipulated for that stopping clause in his lease with the Railway Company." Overall G+. 
Price: 4585.99 USD
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1830s SUPERB ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT BOOKS [2] AND HANDWRITTEN STUDY HIGHLIGHTING THE STATE OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN FRANCE IN THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY, 'S.B.' [?] and CLEMENTINE
2 'S.B.' [?] and CLEMENTINE 1830s SUPERB ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT BOOKS [2] AND HANDWRITTEN STUDY HIGHLIGHTING THE STATE OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN FRANCE IN THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY
France 1830 Good+ Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a superb, original pair [2] of 1830s manuscript journals of multi discipline subjects including; cosmography, mythology, navigation and exploration of the New World, ancient lore, history of powerful monarchies, an extensive history of France from ancient times to the Napoleon Bonaparte era etc all undoubtedly of an advanced level of study hand written by an unidentified student save, we believe, for the initials 'S.B.' in early 19th Century France. The treasured, large folio volumes, on fine watermarked paper comprised of some different sized text blocks, assembled between hard covers with lovely marbleized endpapers is titled on the spine: 'Melanges' and true to the name the books are chock a block with just over 500 pages of comprehensive notes, charts, illustrations etc making for an enormous compilation on the state of the subject's knowledge at the time. The books are representative of what is arguably the pinnacle of World class education as France could boast some of the finest educators and educational institutions of the modern World in the 19th Century and these books reflect that state: very broad in scope, they are arranged by Century, the subjects are anything from Adam and Eve, the human psyche, the four ages of man to Protestantism to the Ancients: Epaminondas, Rhadamille and Zénobie to such luminaries as Louise d'Orléan, the English Duke of Berwick, Marguerite de Valois, Cleopatra, Saladin the Sultan of Egypt, Diocletian and the death of Henry III. General Geography is over 23 pages. Volume I dated 1830 - 31 begins with Cosmography, Mythology, Enigmatic Historic Episodes, Geography. (Cosmographie, 1e et 2e Cahier d'Enigmes Zénobie Curcas 1830, Géographie.) The first subject, Cosmography, begins with the lightning rod invented by Benjamin Franklin in Pennsylvania in 1749 (pannoterre in French) continues for 57 pages. The Planets, lunar eclipses, the ancient civil Egyptian calendar, atmospheric precipitation and other natural phenomenon, etymology of Gregorian calendar months, a summary of the zodiac, geographic coordinates of the globe, wind patterns, solar cycles, stars, meteorites, constellations and solstices comprising the sum total of knowledge regarding cosmography up to that time. Another extensive section titled "Extrait de l'Histoire Universelle" is an historical sketch of civilization starting with Creation and summarizing Biblical people groups such as the Philistines, the Jews, the Amalekites, the Egyptians, so forth. [There is a 27 page section in a different hand, presumably a younger sibling, identified as Clémentine and titled "Analyses Clémentine" being a grammatical exercise: an historic synopsis is summarized vertically in the left margin, each word adjacently being identified for its word class, conjugation, etc.] Volume II dated 1831-32 begins with Navigators, Voyages Around the Principle Provinces of America, History of France, History of England, Ancient Macedonian Races, and much more. (Voyages des Navigateurs, Voyages dans les principales provinces de l'Amérique, Histoire de France, Histoire d'Angleterre, Histoires des Macedoines, [etc.] Cahier d'histoire à Zénobie Curcas. Le 23 Août 1832.) The biographies include Vasco de Gama, Christopher Columbus, Amerigo Vespucci, Ferdinand Magellan, William Parry, Louis de Freycinet, and La Perouse. Adding superb depth there are hand drawn coastlines as discovered by important navigators over time, the first being New France and charting principal cities from Newfoundland to Louisiana. Another section charts a journey intra Mexico to Santa Fe to Los Angeles, then Chihuahua, Durango, Chapala, and Valladolid in the Yucatan. A third chart starts where the second ended, in the Yucatan, charting a voyage to Cuba, Jamaica, Honduras, Nicaragua, and finally Cartagena in Colombia. The same is performed for the coasts of South America, and Africa, the latter being divided into several regions, one of which is a "voyage in the interior of Africa" which crosses the ancient Kingdoms of Egypt and Nubia north to south. This section on navigation is 33 pages. There are descriptions of Turkey, Greece and France [Gaul] and inhabited by Celtic tribes, the ancient races of Macedonia, Rome, Greece and Portugal and a comprehensive historical sketch of France throughout various epochs, beginning with the Middle Ages, and concluding with Napoleon's rule until 1815. Historic moments of many French cities are recorded and compact biographies of the monarchs beginning with Louis VI (1081 - 1137), through the Ancien Régime to Henry VI and his Bourbon dynasty, continuing with the Reformation and King Louis XIV who revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, the French Revolution a century later, major campaigns of Napoleon Bonaparte, and concluding with the death of Louis XVIII 16 September 1824. North American events such as the expansion of French colonies during reign of Louis XIV, the Treaty of Paris in 1763 which ceded French colonies to the English, Louis XVI in American Revolutionary War for Independence and his execution in 1793. Charts and lists then compare kings, governments, battles, and so forth. This section is 150+ pages in five parts bound back to front. The 13 x 8¼ inch books have quarter calf over red boards, gilt lined and titled 'Melanges' to spine, marbled endpapers. The covers are rubbed, the leather chipped in spots but overall G+. 
Price: 6455.99 USD
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1751 ORIGINAL, SUPERB MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF GEOGRAPHY, ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATIONAL WISDOM AT THE THEN APEX OF SCHOLARLY KNOWLEDGE DURING THE AGE OF SAIL, 'W.B.'
3 'W.B.' 1751 ORIGINAL, SUPERB MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF GEOGRAPHY, ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATIONAL WISDOM AT THE THEN APEX OF SCHOLARLY KNOWLEDGE DURING THE AGE OF SAIL
England 1751 Good+ Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a superb, original ancient manuscript book of English origins, titled "Some Memorandums Relating to Geography and Astronomy... Of the Figure and Extent of the Earth." Dated 1751, even casual reading finds the book filled with what was then cutting edge information being a mere 23 years after Newton's Principia appeared in English. The Age of Sail, Britain's dominance of the waves spurred science in the areas of navigation, astronomy and the mathematics of Geometry all related and discussed herein. Historians and researchers of the era will undoubtedly recall this was written at the time John Harrison the English clockmaker perfected his marine chronometer. Handwritten by 'W.B.' we surmise a professor or other academic or even perhaps someone with the Admiralty or even an active command along with a student or assistant as evidenced by a different hand. Sometimes WB offers a notation of the other's writings. Here are some examples: time calculation based on the known hour of day at another location on the globe: "The hour being given in any place, as at London, to find what hour it is in any other part of the world. Rectify ye globe for London... fix ye index of ye dial plate to the hour given suppose 4 oclock in the afternoon, this being done turn the globe, & bring any places successively to ye Meridien then ye index or hour point will shew ye true hour at ye place required... Rome... Constantinople... Fort St. George in East Indies... Pekin in China... Jamaica... Barbadoes..." "On the Longitude and how to find it... This is call'd the Longitude because the earth was supposed longer East to West, than from North to South... to find the true distance from E. to W. see Gordon's table pa 9... By this longitude here, is not meant that wch is so much sought for and desir'd, the Eastening & Westening of Vessels in their Voyages, call'd by Gordon the Opprobrium Navigatorum pa 15, but only the distance between the given place and the first Meridian inscrib'd on the Surface of the Globe, by Bringing the given Degree of Longitude to the Brazen Meridian and reckoning upon the same meridian... To find the Longitude of any given place, bring it to the East side of the Meridien, and observe what degree of the Equator is cutt by the Meridien, for that is the Longitude of the given place... reckoning upon the same Meridien the degree of Latitude given, make a mark with chalk on the point where the Long. & Lat. meet, for that is the place desired..." "The terrestrial Globe represents the true shape of the Earth (or very near it)... 1st by the Eclipses of the moon... 2ndly by the roundness of all other planetary bodyes, as the Moon, Jupiter, etc. it may be inferred... 3dly the Earth is demonstratively round because many persons keeping constantly from England in a Western Course of sailing have pass'd the Magellan Straits, gone on to the Philippine Islands, coasted down by Cochin China... Cape of Good Hope, keeping still to a Western Longitude till they make the Canary Isles, made their return into the North of England." Other data required for navigators, explorers, horologists, clock-makers, cartographers, geographers, meteorologists and other academics of the time would all have interest in the exercises, examples and adding further depth are a number of illustrations hand drawn making for an instructional guide of geographical and celestial problems with solutions. Other subjects include: measurements of the earth, its geographic coordinate system, the significance of the earth's poles and axis, finding longitude or latitude, calculating the placement of the sun in respect to the earth at a certain time, planetary movement, celestial topics such as the rational horizon and the zodiac circle, eclipses, equinoxes and solstices, the oblique descension of the sun, the "brazen meridian," calculation of time including earth's seasons and lunar years, the origin and methodology of the Julian calendar, discerning distances around the world, and some geographical features of earth including equatorial islands. The subject of navigation appears on the first page with proof that the earth is spherical setting the tone for the next 44 pages or so. [We also note that in a few areas are side notes or addendums. For example one area contains Kingdoms of the World: Britain, France, Germany, Persia and Israel just to name a few. Another note shows the capital cities of the great nations and interestingly Jerusalem is specified as the capital of Israel.] 18 x 16 cm. Some age toning and rubbing to the edges, one leaf split at hinge but overall G+. 
Price: 8855.99 USD
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1929 ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT MANUSCRIPT RELIC OF EARLY SOVIET UNION AND AMERICAN RELATIONS HANDWRITTEN BY A KEEN EYED AND ENTHUSIASTIC AMERICAN DELEGATE FROM OAK PARK ILLINOIS A MERE SEVEN YEARS AFTER THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE USSR, ADELE RICE [MRS OWEN R. RICE]
4 ADELE RICE [MRS OWEN R. RICE] 1929 ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT MANUSCRIPT RELIC OF EARLY SOVIET UNION AND AMERICAN RELATIONS HANDWRITTEN BY A KEEN EYED AND ENTHUSIASTIC AMERICAN DELEGATE FROM OAK PARK ILLINOIS A MERE SEVEN YEARS AFTER THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE USSR
MOSCOW USSR RUSSIA OAK PARK ILLINOIS 1929 Very Good Manuscript 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall 
On offer is a super, historically significant manuscript artifact of early Soviet Russia and American relations being the handwritten journal of Adele Rice [Mrs Owen R. Rice Oak Park Illinois], dated April 10th 1929 titled "Our Trip to Russia"; a member of the American Delegation sent on an educational and fact finding mission to Russia a mere 12 years after the Russian Revolutions. The findings and observations of this group are, research suggests, what the book "Russia and the United States" was based on. The book's first entry of the 185 or so pages of narrative was April 3rd then sporadically filled until the last entry Oct. 22nd which we note was exactly one week before the Black Tuesday stock-market crash. The diary is filled with detailed entries of her personal experiences entries cover politics, delegation business, Russian history and social commentary and her journeys whether shopping for antiques and jewelry or to the many parties. She takes numerous lessons on Russia while also teaching them. She also does a super job providing specifics with names, times, dates including; E. Gordon Fox (head engineer of the group the diary refers to) who wrote 'Russia and the Communist Challenge'; Miss Tolstoy, grandniece of the immortal author Count Leo Tolstoy; the Secretary to Swedish Consul; mention of the funeral of Kutlikoff "The Communist head of finance"; Kshesinskaya Danseuse; Mr. Miller of the Hamburg American Line; Sir Perry (Chief Engineer at Ford Motor Company [this was the time Henry Ford signed an agreement with the Soviet Union to produce cars there]; Bill Orr (William); Naberezhnaya Krasnogo Flota, the Red Fleet; talks about VOKS (a cultural society for relations with foreign countries) and much, much more. Here are some snippets: Saturday April 20th Passport official ordered us off the train because we had no visa, in Chicago we were told a visa was unnecessary. Had we been passing thru Holland a visa would not be required. However, as we were returning to Germany one was required. Official very mean. Wouldn't return out PP until we were seated in return train. Damn those Dutch! Monday April 22nd - Went down to lunch. Became acquainted with an aristocratic old lady. After I left the dining room she sent the head waiter after me to ask if she could show me around town. I accepted with pleasure. Frau Tipplekirch took me around in the old section where there were a number of antique shops especially on wall Str. Everything was expensive. Monday April 29th - At 1:40 PM We arrived in Moscow, where we were met by Miss Tolstoy grandniece of count Leo, a man of the legation. Our baggage was locked in the compartments and train switched on another track. Went on a tour of the city in 4 automobiles. Saw the summer palace of Catherine the great, but we were so cold we almost froze to death. Tuesday April 30th - Took an automobile and went to the Europa Hotel. Went out to find a restaurant but none were open, so we returned to hotel and ordered breakfast which was served at 11:30. I never could bear a soft boiled egg, but this morning I ate two! Then we had a business meeting. After which Manus arranged with a Druski driver to take Mary and myself out to see #48 Naberezhnaya Krasnogo Flota, our new home. Sunday May 19th - Up at 9 AM for breakfast. Came back and built fire. Heard the band coming down Naberezhnaya Krasnova. Opened our double window and watched the band escort over 200 sailors to the transport boat. A large crowd had followed, many wives with little children, also sweethearts and parents. One little boy about 2 yrs old cried bitterly to go to his father who was in the ranks. Saturday May 25th - Walter Leck, Ed Everhard, Willis Cleminult, Vance Cronk, Earl Collister & Leo Mandeville left for Kharkov tonight. Gipromez sent a touring car for baggage. No one is allowed on train cars with more than one bag. Most of the fellows had two. They'll be gone for 4 or 5 weeks. Saturday June 1st - Cold and rainy. Sinus headache. Our housekeeper says meat is very scarce. No beef until after the 15th and perhaps no pork. Only veal and fowl. This is because the peasants have no fodder for the cattle and so they are killing them for their own use. Friday June 7th - After dinner walked over to see the Eisenbergs, a very pleasant evening. Mrs. E walked part way home with me. Promised to take me thru Prince Yusupov's Palace next week. Monday June 10th - Got two cards from Owen - one from Kharkov, where he said there were great quantities of Ukrainian Embroidery work. He bought two Emb blouses for himself. The second card was mail in Enakievo. Wednesday June 19th - Had my dinner at 5 instead of 5:30, so I could attend the funeral of Kutlikoff the communist head of finance. Very interesting. Vola, Mrs. Fincke and I watched the procession of thousands of people, soldiers and sailors a short distance from the palace of Labor. Sunday July 21st - Most of the boys worked today so we had tea and sandwiches at noon and dinner at 5:30. Mrs F. & I took a walk as far as the winter palace. The way was crowded with people who came to see the submarines & nine destroyers or cruisers that are here on holidays. In the evening Owen and I went up to the summer gardens, rested a while and then walked down to the church of resurrection. Monday July 22nd - Bill Orr, Mr. Thomas, Hartog, and Ed attended banquet at Europa tonight for the American Delegation. Miss Helen came at 9:20 to give us a lesson. We all laughed and joked quite a lot. [Further talk about a dinner with Sir Perry chief Engineer of Ford Motors.] Friday August 16th - Had a busy AM got a long letter from sister. Phoned "Voks" - Cultural Society for relations with foreign countries, about permit to go thru Kremlin. Friday August 30th - Arrived Moscow 9:20. Took a taxi to Savoy. Ed went directly to Metropole where Freyn and Thomas were stopping. Gordon had wired to Miss Tolstoy to reserve two double-rooms, but seemingly it hadn't been taken care of. Could get only one single-room which we took, deposited our bags, washed up and phone Miss Tolstoy to make arrangements for her services as guide. She arrived at 11 am and soon after we started off for the "Voks" to join group to go thru Kremlin." The 5¾ x 4¾ book is VG. 
Price: 9885.99 USD
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1864 - 1865 ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT CIVIL WAR MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF THE RENOWNED 'FIGHTING SECOND' NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT HANDWRITTEN BY THEIR BELOVED CHAPLAIN AND BATTLE READY COMRADE, CHAPLAIN JOHN WESLEY ADAMS
5 CHAPLAIN JOHN WESLEY ADAMS 1864 - 1865 ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT CIVIL WAR MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF THE RENOWNED 'FIGHTING SECOND' NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT HANDWRITTEN BY THEIR BELOVED CHAPLAIN AND BATTLE READY COMRADE
WITH THE 2ND NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT 1864 Good+ Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a superb, original, historically significant manuscript diary and relic of the Civil War handwritten by noted Chaplain John Wesley Adams, born in Townsend, Massachusetts in 1832, the seventh generation ancestor of the Presidents Adams. On December 5, 1863 Mr. Adams was commissioned chaplain of General Gilman Marston's original command, "The Fighting Second". Devoting himself to social and moral welfare of his comrades, Adams was renowned for the care of his men. Side by side he participated in the battles at Bermuda Hundred, Point of Rocks, the second engagement at Fair Oaks, Swift Creek, Proctor's Creek, Drury's Bluff, Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg, and entering Richmond under General Devens the day of his surrender. Mr. Adams preached before his regiment on the death of Abraham Lincoln, Adams was discharged in 1865 in a testimonial on parchment. Joining the NH Conference, Adams was successful with over a dozen notable pastorates. In 1876 he was chosen a delegate to the General Conference in Baltimore, serving four years as secretary of his conference. The 42 page coverless diary is comprised of folio sized sheets are in 3 text blocks held by string and are titled as detailed 'excerpts' from the diaries of the renowned pastor. Retrospectively done but very, very soon after the dates of the original writings Chaplain Adams provides a factual retelling of his vast service and in fact the writings include for example in one case a riveting word for word passages with a soldier condemned to die for desertion only to exalt in a reprieve to then be shot the next day. Overall G+. 
Price: 5855.99 USD
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1990s HUGE ARCHIVE OF HANDWRITTEN LETTERS, POETRY, DRAWINGS AND EPHEMERA OF BRITAIN'S MOST FEARED AND NOTORIOUS AUTHOR, ARTIST, KIDNAPPER, ARMED ROBBER, PHYSICAL FITNESS EXPERT, LONG TIME PRISON INMATE AND SELF CLAIMED 'MAD MAN', CHARLES BRONSON aka MICHAEL PETERSON aka CHARLES SALVADOR
6 CHARLES BRONSON aka MICHAEL PETERSON aka CHARLES SALVADOR 1990s HUGE ARCHIVE OF HANDWRITTEN LETTERS, POETRY, DRAWINGS AND EPHEMERA OF BRITAIN'S MOST FEARED AND NOTORIOUS AUTHOR, ARTIST, KIDNAPPER, ARMED ROBBER, PHYSICAL FITNESS EXPERT, LONG TIME PRISON INMATE AND SELF CLAIMED 'MAD MAN'
ENGLAND BROADMOOR PRISON PARKHURST WAKEFIELD 1995 Very Good+ Manuscript 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is an original, exciting, massive archive of correspondence, some hand-drawn art, other writings including poetry, articles, postcards, photos, greeting cards and both terrifying and humorous intimate personal letters, news clippings and ephemera relating to and created by Charles Bronson - born Michael Peterson, his named was changed by his boxing manager - who is considered to be Britain’s most feared, in/famous and notorious prisoner. He is also the author of ten books, a poet, armed robber, kidnapper, philanthropist, philosopher, boxer, award winning fitness expert and former circus strongman. Mr. Bronson, was first arrested as a 19 year old in 1974 and has been in prison for 34 years and over 28 years in solitary and has been free less than 120 days in that 34 years. He has been moved over 150 times to and within different prisons. Mr. Bronson has also committed some renowned, notorious acts while in prison including a number of spectacular hostage-takings; they include a two day rooftop protest at Broadmoor Prison in 1983 which caused three quarters of a million pounds damage. In a 1994 kidnapping/escape attempt, he demanded a helicopter, an inflatable doll and a cup of tea as ransom for the release of the guard he was holding at Woodhill Prison. There is a worldwide petition to free Charles Bronson based on the fact that he has suffered an extraordinarily lengthy incarceration while never having killed, raped or molested anyone. Free in spirit Mr. Bronson’s original conviction of 7 years for armed robbery has blossomed to 34 years due to his numerous prison scrapes with authority. Many organizations for prisoner's rights have declared him a ‘political’ prisoner making his long term incarceration all the more untenable. This archive is the accumulation of approximately 15 years by a woman who at one time was engaged to be married to Mr. Bronson. As such the correspondence is of an intimate nature on all levels of Mr. Bronson’s personal and penal life; relationships, activities, hardships with all of its tragedies and comedies. Further correspondence details every aspect of his life in jail, his attempts to be free, his physical fitness program. Mr. Bronson is an incredibly expressive and prolific writer and there are many, many streams of correspondence; writings to and from his fiance, lawyers, publishers, editors, other convicts, fans and friends. He is obviously intelligent and a very driven man in many ways. Some of this material is not for the weak of heart and some will have you laughing hard. Mr. Bronson also had a number of interesting friends; he is godfather to the son of Ronald Biggs, of the Great Train Robbery fame; a pal to the Kray Brothers, leaders of an infamous family run crime gang of whom he wrote a book based on their lives and relationship with him are but a few. We noted a Christmas card to Mr. Bronson's fiance with his and perhaps 30 autographs of other well wishers for example. This archive is the definition of 'one of a kind' as a unique, unparalleled look into the essence of criminality, law enforcement, criminal psychology and the British government and it's penal system. It is also a one of a kind portal into the heart, soul, mind and demons of a long term convict, a noted artist, prolific writer poet with the added perspective of a romance and long distance relationship of very high intensity. There are many, many hundreds if not over a 1000 pages of correspondence filling a 22 x 16 x 7 inch tub right now and will probably ship in one banker's box and will require a secure shipping method like UPS. We noticed about half a dozen pieces of original artwork, a small number of large and small format postcard style paper with artwork and then doodles and drawings throughout the correspondence. Overall condition is VG+. 
Price: 35585.99 USD
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1763 - 1764 SUPERB, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF HER LIFE AND JOURNAL OF HER RELIGIOUS TURMOIL AND DESPAIR HANDWRITTEN BY THE SOON TO BE WIFE OF A NOTED ENGLISH CLERGYMAN, ELIZABETH KINGSLEY [later SYMONDS]
7 ELIZABETH KINGSLEY [later SYMONDS] 1763 - 1764 SUPERB, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF HER LIFE AND JOURNAL OF HER RELIGIOUS TURMOIL AND DESPAIR HANDWRITTEN BY THE SOON TO BE WIFE OF A NOTED ENGLISH CLERGYMAN
BEDFORD ENGLAND 1763 Very Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾ 
On offer is a sensational, original ancient 1763 through 1764 manuscript journal of thoughts, emotions, religious out pouring and continual internal dialogue threaded throughout diary entries of the author's daily life and family. The 144 page book was handwritten by Elizabeth Kingsley [later Symonds] when she married Reverend Joshua Symonds the noted clergyman who presided at the Bunyan Meeting Hall in Bedford and the man who took over after the death of the great John Bunyan author of "Pilgrims Progress." Dated October 20th, 1763 to June 30th, 1764 the 6 ¼" x 7 ½" book with a faded teal cover is marked No. 3, numbers, 1 and 2 lost to history, has another name; Elizabeth Emery, Bedford being her daughter, this manuscript relic offers a super insight into her life and times: her "attempts" to follow her teachings from the Bible and her teachers. She writes of the sermons of such preachers of the Evangelical Revival as Madan, Romaine, Venn, Brittain, Langford, Hogg, Brewer at Pinner's Hall and others. She writes of visits to "Wesley's" chapel and attending a Methodist meeting, though not a "follower". Descriptions of life include "The Lord Mayor's Parade", entries on their servants, including one who had died after leaving their service "a carnal woman", illness in the family and she is often "troubled with frightful dreams" and so much more. Here are some snippets of this intriguing diary: "I am at present slothful in religion, but I have no power to do anything; I can't help myself. My spiritual disease rages and gets head apace and at the same I fund my strength decay" and "A very stupid frame I have been in today; but O yet blessed be the Lord, he had not left me for some weeks past, to those great terrors which sometimes I have…"1763 "October 20th, But what can I hope for from the one who I have so often offended. I daily sin against my only remedy. The complicated woes that I feel, they are too great to be escaped. I am ready to give up all hope and lay down in perpetual sorrow. But then sometimes at the extremity, I cast my self before the only Savoir and pray that he will have mercy on me and pray that I may serve him, then my wounded conscience gets a little ease, and I think my conflicts are abated; but ah! Too soon they all return. Jesus, master, have mercy on me, O restore to me the joys of thy salvation. Do then heal all my diseases, take me as a poor lost sheep and carry me upon they shoulder, for I can't walk one step of the way to glory. I commit my soul to thee this night and will lay me down to rest, hoping for better times. Sleep begins to overpower me, praised be God that I have a comfortable bed to rest on. I have forfeited every mercy but yet he bestows many upon me." (She always talks about being "afflicted with drowsiness" and takes something for it.) "November 3rd, Yesterday there was a parting in the family. One went away who had been in the house near a year and half. I was sorry at first and retired as soon as I could and put up a few petitions for her and also for her that I expected to supply her place that her coming here might be for her good. But she never came and I have been all this day stirring about and had but little time for my soul, likewise have mist hearing Mr. Brittain. However in all things I say, thy will of the Lord be done. I would learn something from everything that happens; and from seeing how it is to be so full employed with worldly business, I would learn to be thankful that my dear friends are in such circumstances as to keep some body to do the work. Send us, O Lord, I pray thee, send a proper person if it be thy will, one that is of the household of faith….." "November 4th, Tis still bad as to the affairs of my soul. Have this day taken a stranger into the family. May I be interested in her behalf and endeavor to do her all the good that I possibly can; O help me Lord, to set a good example." "November 9th, This has been Lord Mayors day and a disagreeable day to me for I went to the show, to take my sisters who had never seen it before and were very desirous of it. I was but low in spirits yet that was much better than if I had been light and trifling. I thought what a deal of time there had been spent in preparation for a vain show and for the feasts and ball which was to be this evening. A friend of mine said how these people shame Christians, but that is for want of our having our end more in view. I desire to be very thankful that we are got safe home without the least accident, especially as we were in very imminent danger. We came out of the house too soon and just after there came such a violent crowd we could neither go on nor get back, and I really thought one of the children would have been killed. I don't know that when I was so frightened in my life; but yet not upon my own account, tho I was in danger, but I had two little ones to take care of and I thought they would either have been thrown down or trampled to death or have had their limbs broke. It was a great mercy they did not fall for if they had, there would have been no hope. My sprits were quite terrified, and it was not just a fright and then over but we stood for a long time in the street and I had my pocket pickt and lost six or seven shillings at least. The Lord did in my distress send me help and two men greatly defended me. May he reward them for it. One of them conducted me safe out of the crowd….." "November 18th, This morning when I wak'd I was much troubled; and wished to have returned to that state of insensibility that I had just left. I seem'd only to open my eyes to sorrow, and expected to have had a sad disconsolate day; but glory be to God he quickly gave me peace but I have not time to record particulars." "November 23rd, These words have often come into my mind lately, as applicable to me. Sensual, not having the spirit, and today I thought these words were very suitable. Malachi 1:10. I have no pleasure in you, with the Lord of hosts, neither will I accept an offering at your hand. God seems to reject all that I do; and indeed very justly, for my hands are full of wickedness, thou Lord art holy, just and true. This I will, I must confess, tho I should be miserable forever. The Lord won't accept any offering that I bring but what is the reason, why I offer him a corrupt thing; but I have not a male in my flock, else would I offer it. I pray that his little spark may be blown into a flame." "November 26th, I walk at present by some very faint glimmerings of light." "December 1st, ……I am at present very slothful in religion, but I have no power to do anything. I can't help myself. My spiritual disease rages and gets head apace and at the same I find my strength decay." "December 5th, In the day time I am commonly pretty well in spirit because there is one thing, or other to divert my attention but of a night; when I retire to my closet, and to my bed; then my distress and fear visit me. However I don't desire peace till it is of the right sort. I want not to have my thoughts diverted, I desire no rest, but what flows from the knowledge of my reconciliation to God and to know that I would give ten thousand worlds were they at my disposal." "December 14th, There has been company here yesterday and today which has put me into a hurry of spirits and I have had but little time for retirement because they lay at the house. However I was pretty comfortable yesterday and had some sweet seasons in prayer and I found as I went backward and forward to fetch and carry things, that I could many times life up my heart to God. I had a mind last night to write a letter to an old acquaintance that I had not seen since my being changed. I bed the assistance of the Holy Spirit in it. That he would dictate to me and I only have to write the words, but I did not find it so. I was much left to myself. I staid up till this morning to finish it then went to bed and slept not 4 hours, was but poorly as to my body when I got up…." We note this is the era of John Howard, a wealthy landowner in Cardington who would soon be High Sheriff of the county and from his experience resolved to devote his life to prison reform. Overall G+. BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES: Elizabeth was born on July 16th, 1741 to the parents of Charles Kingsley and Elizabeth Kingsley. She married Reverend Joshua Symonds in 1767 and was the mother of Mary, Anna, Sarah, Esther, Elizabeth, Priscilla, John, Hannah, Thomas and more. In fact the couple had 12 children all together. She died on August 27th, 1792. So she was just 22 years old when writing in her diary. Elizabeth and her husband have some very historical and noteworthy backgrounds. [Two of Elizabeth Kingsley's closest friends were Hannah Wilberforce and Eliza Delafield. Hannah was married to the uncle of the future anti-slavery campaigner, William Wilberforce, and bought him up after the death of his father in 1768, when he was still a child. It was she who inculcated him with Evangelical views, much to the horror of his mother and grandfather who a few years later took him back into their care. She was also the Great Aunt of the novelist Charles Kingsley.] Her soon to be husband, Joshua Symonds, was the son of an apothecary in Kidderminster. In the magazine: "The Baptist Magazine dated 1823: "On the 3rd of November, 1767, Mr. Symonds was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Kingsley, daughter of an eminent druggist, who resided in Lime-street, London and who proved a most excellent Christian both in young and mature age; amiable, modest, benevolent, and heavenly minded, she was indeed the pastor's wife. Previously to her marriage much of her time had been spent with her friend, the late Mrs. Wilberforce, whose habitation was a heaven upon earth, and every day resembled a Sabbath. Here Mrs. Symonds no doubt in spiritual converse with her friend, acquired the habit of and delight in abstractedness from the world, and that deep toned piety which characterized the whole of her life." 
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1943 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF ONE BRITISH GUNNER'S MISERABLE 6 MONTHS IN DIEGO SUAREZ MADAGASCAR, GUNNER C.J. WALLACE O.F.C. 1612928
8 GUNNER C.J. WALLACE O.F.C. 1612928 1943 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF ONE BRITISH GUNNER'S MISERABLE 6 MONTHS IN DIEGO SUAREZ MADAGASCAR
DIEGO SUAREZ MADAGASCAR INDIAN OCEAN 1943 Good Manuscript 16mo - over 5¾" - 6¾" tall 
On offer is a super, original manuscript diary and World War II relic of one British man's unwelcome service as a Gunner for His Majesty's Army in the East Africa Command. Handwritten by Gunner C.J. Wallace O.F.C. [Ordnance Factory] 1612928 while serving in Diego Suarez Madagascar the diary is kept in a small notebook and very neatly covers the six month period from January 1st 1943, four days before they embark by ship for Madagascar, to June 30th, at which point it ends because the book is full at 120 well filled pages. Madagascar was prior to early 1942 a French colony and Churchill feared that Vichy France would allow the Japanese to use the island as a base for operations in the Indian Ocean. This fear led to a British and Allied offensive in the spring of 1942 which successfully led to the invasion of the island. Wallace of the 152 E.A.H.A.A. Battery [152 East Africa Heavy Anti Aircraft Battery] was part of the East Africa Brigade based at the most important harbour, Diego Suarez, on the northern tip of the island and part of the all important defenses of Britain's strengthening hold of the area. He served as part of heavy artillery crew whose job was to defend against enemy aircraft or shipping. During the period of the diary there is little action save for a couple of times enemy aircraft flew over Diego Suarez and at one point there is concern over a ship sighted offshore but this proves not to be an enemy craft. The only "action" involves local people accidentally wounded during a training exercise. The diary does a superb job relating the day-to-day grind of an overseas posting. You get a real sense of the relentlessness of it all and it reflects the joyless, powerless, day-to-day experience of many young conscripts. The writer is bored, homesick and miserable. He and his comrades are often ill with diarrhoea or malaria. There is a constant low level grumbling: the weather; the filth, the squalor of the local town, the privations of the accommodation, the poor food, the failure of the army to keep his pay up to date, the poor transport infrastructure, the behaviour of the natives, the behaviour of the officers and - most of all - the constant, pointless emphasis on petty regulation and "spit and polish". There are numerous passages in the diary which could illustrate this. Here is a snippet: 'We had to change our beds today, for three planks of wood, everybody must have the same, even if you were nice and comfortable before. Just like our battery. I suspect it's all Godfrey's doings, even if you have your own camp bed, when the day comes for inspection, you have to hide it and show three planks with kit on.' Several times the author writes simply and rather movingly that he just wishes he could go home to his wife, Joan, whom he misses greatly. The only high points are the regular games of football, listening to the wireless when it works and a two week leave period at the town of Joffreville in a converted sawmill established to enable soldiers to request and recuperate. In June a brothel, "licensed by army medical authorities" with "white and almost white girls" opened in Diego Suarez for the use of officers. The writer hears rumours that a brothel for other ranks will follow with "girls from Kenya" but he finds this an appalling prospect. The diary is a small notebook with 104 pages, all of which are fully written on. There are no missing or damaged pages but the covers are detached from the single staple which holds the notebook together. Tucked in the diary is an abandoned draft of a letter from the author to his wife in south London, plus a couple of simple, rhyming poems in which the writer expresses his cynicism about the army life. He suggests the regimental motto should be "Semper in Excreta"! Overall G. 
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1969 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT TRAVEL DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF SAN FRANCISCO'S MOST FAMOUS POLITICIANS, RESTAURANTEURS, PHILANTHROPISTS AND DRAG QUEENS KNOWN AS THE GRAND MERE AND THE ABSOLUTE EMPRESS I OF SAN FRANCISCO, JOSE JULIO SARRIA
9 JOSE JULIO SARRIA 1969 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT TRAVEL DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF SAN FRANCISCO'S MOST FAMOUS POLITICIANS, RESTAURANTEURS, PHILANTHROPISTS AND DRAG QUEENS KNOWN AS THE GRAND MERE AND THE ABSOLUTE EMPRESS I OF SAN FRANCISCO
Paris FRANCE 1969 Very Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a sensational and in many ways unusual travel memoir handwritten by the famous and some would say notorious José Julio Sarria a ground breaking homosexual politician, restaurateur, philanthropist, drag queen and senior member of the San Francisco gay social elite who details a July 5th 1969 [unstated but the dates match the year] through July 31st. José Julio Sarria [while unsigned the 9 x 6½ inch notebook is undoubtedly in the hand of José Julio Sarria given the item came directly from his estate and includes detailed entries of well known people in his life] details a trip to Paris France that makes for a ribald tales of two hedonists: unabashed socializing, sexualizing and gourmet foods in his 25 or so days in Paris and some in Holland. Sarria prefaces the narrative with an index: 'List of Happiness in Paris' which in fact is a breakdown of his 20 or so sexual liaisons with a breakdown of some sexual acts included. A more modest chart is part of his Dutch data. He holds nothing back in this travel memoir of the many, multiple, casual and formal occasions they have sex though sometimes he or Pierre merely talk about making a date and then 'a good time was had by all'. Along with the sexual adventures is an interesting narrative on the travel aspects: rather than typical tourist entries Sarria and Pierre go from one group of friends and acquaintances or family to another interacting with them and also the characters they meet on the way, a gypsy Ramon who Jose services several times, waiters, teachers etc., etc. There is much discussion of the food. All told there are 70+ pages plus a few addresses and financials in the back in Jose's bold style. Overall VG. Wikipedia: José Julio Sarria also known as The Grand Mere, Absolute Empress I de San Francisco, and the Widow Norton (December 12, 1922 or 1923 - August 19, 2013) was an American political activist from San Francisco, California who, in 1961, became the first openly gay candidate for public office in the United States. He is also remembered for performing as a drag queen at the Black Cat Bar and as the founder of the Imperial Court System. Following the closure of the Black Cat in 1964, Sarria went to work with restaurateur Pierre Parker. The pair operated French restaurants at World's Fairs. While at the 1964 New York World's Fair, Sarria learned that Jimmy Moore had committed suicide. Sarria worked at several more Fairs before retiring in 1974. After living with Parker in Phoenix, Arizona for several years, Sarria returned to San Francisco. He continued to reign over the Courts for 43 years, before abdicating in 2007. For his lifetime of activism, the city of San Francisco renamed a section of 16th Street in Sarria's honor. Also: The International Imperial Court System (IICS) also known as the International Court System is one of the oldest and largest LGBT organizations in the world. 
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c1896 ORIGINAL TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT STUDY OF ADVANCED HIGHLY TECHNICAL COMPLEX MATHEMATICS BY A PRODIGY WHO WOULD DIE WITHIN THE YEAR AT THE AGE OF 23, JOSEPH GERMAIN CHARLES COTTIER
10 JOSEPH GERMAIN CHARLES COTTIER c1896 ORIGINAL TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT STUDY OF ADVANCED HIGHLY TECHNICAL COMPLEX MATHEMATICS BY A PRODIGY WHO WOULD DIE WITHIN THE YEAR AT THE AGE OF 23
NEW YORK CITY NY 1896 Good- Manuscript 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is an original 20 page manuscript, typed and handwritten, by Joseph G.C. Cottier (1874-1897). Titled "The Expression Of The General Equations Of Hydrodynamics In Terms Of Curvilinear Coordinates" which relates to his work and intense study of the science of hydromechanics. Cottier had read and mastered nearly all of the extensive and profoundly difficult literature of this science, which has occupied the attention of the most eminent mechanicians during the past two centuries and this work is part of the fruits of his research. From the personal papers of Robert Simpson Woodward (1849-1924) American physicist and mathematician, born at Rochester, Michigan. He graduated C.E. at the University of Michigan in 1872 and was appointed assistant engineer on the United States Lake Survey. In 1882 he became assistant astronomer for the United States Transit of Venus Commission. In 1884 he became astronomer to the United States Geological Survey, serving until 1890, when he became assistant in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. In 1893 he was called to Columbia as professor of mechanics and subsequently became professor of mathematical physics as well. He was dean of the faculty of pure science at Columbia from 1895 to 1905, when he became president of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, whose reputation and usefulness as a means of furthering scientific research was widely extended under his direction. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1896. In 1898-1900 he was president of the American Mathematical Society and in 1900 president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1915 he was appointed to the Naval Consulting Board. He died in 1924 in Washington, D.C. Professor Woodward carried on researches and published papers in many departments of astronomy, geodesy, and mechanics. In the course of his work with the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey he devised and constructed the "iced bar and long tape base apparatus," which enables a base line to be measured with greater accuracy and with less expense than by methods previously employed. His work on the composition and structure of the earth and the variation of latitude found expression in a number of valuable papers. Titled and signed on verso, 20 pages, 8 x 13". Soiled. BIO NOTES: Joseph G.C. Cottier (1874-1897) Cottier was a graduate student in Columbia during the academic years 1895-7. The exceptionally rapid progress he made justified the expectation that he would soon become an original investigator of the first order in the domains of mathematical physics. Joseph Germains Charles Cottier was born in Jersey City, N. J., May 29, 1874. He was graduated from Stevens Institute of Technology, with the degree of mechanical engineer in 1894. During the following year he was employed in engineering work, partly by the East River Gas Company of New York and partly by the Blake Pump Company. Although successful in this work, it proved of little interest to him, and he resolved to turn his attention to studies which would lead him to an academic career. Accordingly he applied for and was awarded a scholarship in Columbia University, and he entered the School of Pure Science in the autumn of 1895. He chose mechanics as his major subject and mathematics and education as minors. At the end of the academic year 1895-6 he was appointed fellow in mechanics and received the degree of A.M. Continuing his studies with marked proficiency, he was reappointed Fellow in Mechanics at the close of the year 1896?7, and he expected to complete the work required for the doctorate degree during the present academic year. He had made a special study of the science of hydromechanics. He had read and mastered nearly all of the extensive and profoundly difficult literature of this science, which has occupied the attention of the most eminent mechanicians during the past two centuries. He had already begun to produce original work in this field; and on departing in July last for Europe he left for publication papers on the equations of hydrodynamics in a form suitable for application to problems connected with the movements of the earth's atmosphere, and on the expression of the general equations of hydrodynamics in terms of curvilinear coordinates. The first of these papers has been published in vol. XXV of the Monthly Weather Review of the United States Weather Bureau, and the second will be published in the Mathematical Review. Personally Mr. Cottier was an exceedingly unassuming man, and modest almost to shyness with respect to his own attainments. Because of these characteristics, and by reason of incessant occupation with his studies, few of his associates, and few even of his instructors, came to know him intimately. The few to whom he became well known, however, held him in highest esteem, as well for his singularly gentle and courteous manliness as for the penetrating clearness and strength of his intellectual capacity. It is fitting in this connection to state that Mr. Cottier's parents have given his collection of treatises and papers on the mathematico-physical sciences to the library of the Department of Mechanics. They have thus founded a permanent memorial of their son's devotion to science, and have at the same time shown his and their appreciation of the fellowship honors which Columbia had twice bestowed upon him. [written by Prof. Robert S. Woodward in 1897]. 
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1849 - 1868 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTERS COPY BOOK AND JOURNAL HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF HOLLAND'S PRE EMINENT SURGICAL INSTRUMENT MAKERS, JULIUS THEODOOR LEOPOLD HOEFFTCKE
11 JULIUS THEODOOR LEOPOLD HOEFFTCKE 1849 - 1868 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTERS COPY BOOK AND JOURNAL HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF HOLLAND'S PRE EMINENT SURGICAL INSTRUMENT MAKERS
LEIDEN HOLLAND THE NETHERLANDS 1849 Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is the fascinating, original 1849 through 1850s journal and letter copy book of the renowned Dutch instrument maker Julius Theodoor Leopold Hoefftcke. Born on 12 March 1800 in Berlin he moved to Leiden at age 26 and within two years he was appointed as the instrument maker of Leiden University. He supplied the academic world with instruments until his death in 1875. After which his grandson took over the company and moved to England. The book is a superb source for researchers and historians as a rare insight into the world of Dutch instrument making which was a growth industry and for which the Dutch were ferociously proud. This book contains all the financial agreements of Mr. Hoefftcke around 1850s to 1860s. For every individual borrowing the instruments or goods he noted how much should have been paid, when it had to be paid and once paid he confirmed it in his book. From his letters one could conclude that he did not only loan out his goods, but also sold them. The book shows that the financial agreements do not only limit themselves to the University of Leiden and in fact his instruments were shipped long distances. We note a letter shows that instruments were sent to J. Pohl, who was an instrument maker located in the Hague since 1820. Besides the financial agreements, there are also some formal letters to the clients and suppliers. Based on the letters one could say that some, or perhaps all of the letters, were just a written copy of an original letters. Many letters point out the author was German born as narrative is peppered with 'mit' and 'und' but most of this material dates about 25 years after he moved to the Netherlands, so his Dutch is excellent and definitely understandable. The book proper is somewhat shaken but otherwise G. 
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1941 - 1945 ORIGINAL GROUP OF MANUSCRIPT DIARIES [7] AND NOTEBOOK [1] DETAILING THE SERVICE, DUTIES AND SOMETIMES EXTREME OPINIONS OF AN OFFICER OF THE STORIED USS RANGER, AMERICA'S FIRST TRUE AIRCRAFT CARRIER, LIEUTENANT HENRY CABELL MADDUX, JR., USN
12 LIEUTENANT HENRY CABELL MADDUX, JR., USN 1941 - 1945 ORIGINAL GROUP OF MANUSCRIPT DIARIES [7] AND NOTEBOOK [1] DETAILING THE SERVICE, DUTIES AND SOMETIMES EXTREME OPINIONS OF AN OFFICER OF THE STORIED USS RANGER, AMERICA'S FIRST TRUE AIRCRAFT CARRIER
USS RANGER et al 1941 Good+ Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a super group of eight [8] original manuscript diaries and notebook handwritten by Lieutenant Henry Cabell Maddux, Jr. while serving on the noted American warship the U.S.S. Ranger, the first U.S. Navy ship specifically designed and built as an aircraft carrier. Henry proves to be a sporadic writer. Long pauses and then full and well filled pages of his doings, duties but most importantly his observations of the war both predictive and specific. Historians and researchers of WWII and the actions of the US Navy will find an unusual author and commentator in Lt. Maddux. He frequently comments negatively on the methodology and philosophy behind the American war effort and the orders he and his superior officers are required to implement or not. We note a passage commenting on the Navy's desire to fight and the Army holding it back. We also note what we feel are perhaps very insightful but near seditious comments regarding Pearl Harbor: "Ensign stopped me and told me about Japan's attack as I went to my shower. At last it is here. Just as I have said for so long. God help us now. West Va. sunk, Oklahoma on fire, Lexington damaged and God knows what else. The fleet anchored asleep and off guard. Typical. Someone will have to answer. How could Japs come 4000 miles unseen? Our poor dumb American fools - trade school stuffed shirts. Even our President fooled. Now I hope our people are satisfied. We may win but we don't deserve to. Thousands of Americans dead tonite and criminal neglect by high officers is to blame. I can just picture it. Everyone ashore, lights on, no blackout - suddenly the unmanned ships were blown up. I bet not one plane was ready to take the air and fight at once - not one Army or Navy. A historic day but bad for us. Now Mr. Wheeler, Nye, Fish, Lindbergh et al - what have you to say. How right I have been all along. I can't see how anyone could have failed to see it coming. Well the war's on - let's see the great democracy try to fight democratically." Of the eight books there is: One book is of a technical nature: lists of those on watch duty, sailors, personnel in watch groups etc., notes from discussions regarding effective use of torpedoes, perhaps half filled; then; 1941 March 27 to Dec 31st; 1942 [three books], the first Jan 1 to April 20th, the second blank until June 25th filled near fully through September 30th the third book beginning October 2nd to November 23rd though missing a few days in November. [We note the last 2-3 words of his last entry were removed.] 1944 Jan 1 to Dec 31st; 1945 [two books], the first May 9th to October 12th; the second, Jan 1 to May 8th. We can find no explanation for Lieutenant's propensity for using multiple books for some years. There are many bit of ephemera tucked in: letters, chits, and even pages used for diary entries when the book was not at hand. The Lieutenant was a fairly consistent, though sporadic with in the books proper, writing near daily though the entries tend to jump around the individual volumes and were sometimes written on loose sheets of paper then tucked in. As typical with WWII diaries there are entries about Pearl Harbor and the start of the war, the atomic bombing of Japan and the end of the war in Europe and Japan, though we find only a few notes and a few oblique references regarding the USS Ranger's most notable actions in the Algeria-Morocco landings and actions off Casablanca, both in November 1942 and the Norway raid in October 1943. For of the books are largish 7¾ inch tall, the others about 6 inches tall. All are page a day style. Overall G+. 
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c1870s ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT CIVIL WAR DIARY DETAILING THE BRUTAL TREATMENT AND SCANDALOUS TRIAL OF 3 UNION OFFICERS HANDWRITTEN BY A KEY PLAYER & MUCH MALIGNED MIDDLE AGED UNION ARMY OFFICER, ATTORNEY WHO AT ONE TIME OR ANOTHER HAD THE EAR OF PRESIDENTS, MORVEN M. JONES
13 MORVEN M. JONES c1870s ORIGINAL, SIGNIFICANT CIVIL WAR DIARY DETAILING THE BRUTAL TREATMENT AND SCANDALOUS TRIAL OF 3 UNION OFFICERS HANDWRITTEN BY A KEY PLAYER & MUCH MALIGNED MIDDLE AGED UNION ARMY OFFICER, ATTORNEY WHO AT ONE TIME OR ANOTHER HAD THE EAR OF PRESIDENTS
UTICA NEW YORK WASHINGTON DC OLD CAPITOL PRISON 1879 Good+ Manuscript 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is a sensational, original manuscript Civil War relic of no little significant historical content. The author Morven M. Jones [1815-1886; Utica New York], was a key player in one of the Civil War's most notorious scandals: allegations of election fraud, vote tampering, conspiracy, leading to the brutal arrest and incarceration of three men; a Union Colonel, a Major and the author a middle aged Lieutenant cashiered out as an officer due to the ill effects of his time as a POW, working under the auspices of the Governor of New York whilst trying to follow unclear regulations. The case details were published in a pamphlet and researchers and historians will treasure the fact that Mr. Jones wrote his 50 page or so memoir in the broad margins of an early printed edition of this booklet about him and his co-defendants case and the trial: The United States of America vs., Samuel North, Levi Cohn and Morven M. Jones [the published work names him as Marvin which he corrected in pencil]. Writing retrospectively, we note his signature at the close of an entry near the end dated 1879, he writes a commentary following the published parts of the trial and at great length about his arrest, incarceration and his time and terrible treatment at the Old Capitol Prison especially by the warden William Wood. He also writes about his time during the war, conversations he had with President Abraham Lincoln and much, much more offering page after page of historical narrative. Here are some snippets: North, Jones, and Cohn were arrested by Military Police Oct 27, 1864 and at once placed in separate close confinement in Old Capitol Prison…The cells were close and sultry during the day but the nights were cold and chilly…One day I burned a broom handle slowly nearly from end to end for fear of entirely losing fire to kindle with…While in the cells we were not allowed to look out of the small windows not even to place our faces to the lower part of the window….Several times when I had my face close to the lower end of the window trying to inhale a little fresh air, did I see a musket pointed at my head with the order from the sentinel to get away from that wind…several of our soldiers being shot for looking out of the windows of the prison. The windows were the death line and if a prisoner could be seen looking out the order or the practice was to shoot him…My wife was one of the most fearless women I had ever known…she could assist in an amputation of a soldiers limb with as much coolness as any surgeon in the army while all the tender sympathies of the mother, wife and sister combined….soon after our imprisonment Col Foster told my wife she might as well go home, that she could do her husband no good by staying in Washington and he would be convicted and sent to state prison…whenever she went in the street was under the surveillance of male and female spies and detectives. Her private baggage and clothing was searched several times once by men with shoulder straps, she told these that her husband had been an officer…He suspected someone was preparing to attempt to escape that evening and if he saw anyone trying to get out there his orders were to shoot him. The attempt was made and the prisoner was shot dead and then Wood after telling the story would laugh at it as a good joke…Bill Wood superintendent of Old Capitol, Atheist and generally a brute as he was sometimes had good streaks in him, at one of the times when North, Jones and Cohn had been taken from their cells and put in the large favored room with some 20 to 30 other gentlemen, he said to us you damned New York ballot box stuffers have no business here…didn't do half as bad things as I did at Baltimore on Election day for I and the other fellows I took with me voted early and often…One prisoner by a bold reckless effort escaped in broad daylight although the prisoner was surrounded by 3 lines of sentinels…One day an old man and his daughter a good and respectable looking young woman were brought to the prison from West Virginia as hostages for a son and brother who was accused of a crime and with being in the rebel service. The girl was placed in one end of the block alone and there were seldom any but very few females prisoners in that part of the building. Wood used to visit her room ostensibly to obtain some state secrets but it was well known that he was a beast in his passions, soon it was known that the girls was very ill of brain fever and was a raving maniac, about a week after the body of the poor girl was carried from the prison in a rough box, the father was weeping in the prison yard he had not been allowed to visit her during her illness nor was he allowed to see her remains and all of this within almost a stones throw of the Capitol of the United States…At one time a colored soldier was brought to the prison under sentence of death by court martial for shooting his wife. He was to be hanged in two days this was the first he had heard of his sentence. He was placed in a cell close by where I was and a colored preacher was sent to prepare him for his doom. Bill Wood said it looked too damned bad that if his death could be put off for a week he would find whiskey and beef steak and the nigger preacher could pray the poor devil right straight into Father Abraham's bosom. Early next morning the day of execution Wood sent the colored preacher in his carriage to ask President Lincoln to defer the execution for a week but the preacher returned saying he could not see the President. wood said no one could keep him out of the White House and he and the preacher started putting the horse to his speed…saying the President would very likely interfere and compel them to come again that it would be just as well to hang the man that morning. Wood came back jubilant over his success in seeing the President Lincoln and told the preacher to do his best and pray the nigger in Abraham's bosom…When arrested October 27 I was put in a cell with a man charged with passing Confederate money, here I was buried out of sight…Nov 1 a prison official opened my cell door and ordered to proceed to the prison office as I did with a guard of a soldier with a fixed bayonet…On our trial we called for the order for our arrest and it was then By Order of Abraham Lincoln President by HA Stanton Secretary of War a forged or substituted order died the next day after we were in prison…May 17 my wife and self with Dr Coventry and Merit Peckham started for Washington on a telegram from JF Seymour this was soon after the slaughter of the Wilderness…My wife and myself devoted our time and strength to the 50,000 wounded and sick soldiers in the hospitals at Washington. They died there by thousands many recovered or were removed to distant hospitals or were sent home discharged but the places were filled from the battlefield the 50000 cots were full. This was true while Republican soldiers in the hospitals in Washington had no difficulty in having their voting papers certified by officers detailed of the purpose every obstacle was thrown in the way of Democratic soldiers…An Oswego Captain whose arm was shattered so that he could but barely write his name and that with much pain and difficulty being a Democrat came from his hospital to the NY agency and for a day or two and took a few votes. For this he was at once dismissed from the service without any ceremony only for helping some wounded democratic soldiers to send home their votes for the old Gen Little Mac and Gov Seymour…The next Monday Jones and his traps were taken to cell No 8 where he was put in with a Cincinnati engraver arrested on a charge of counterfeiting…in a few days Jones was taken from No 8 and put in cell No 6 where he found Col North alone and Sick…The next day Wood called for Cohn and invited him to take a ride took him to the Treasury where they stopped fora few minutes and then drove on to the White House, with as much freedom as tho he had owned the White House, Bill Wood invited Cohn upstairs to see Old Abe, they were shown into a small room and there Cohn found the President, Col Foster the Judge Advocate and Clephane the recorder of the military court, the two men who had imposed themselves upon Jones in the Prison Office 25 days before. The whole trick and conspiracy were apparent at a glance…After an Introduction President Lincoln with Foster, Clephane and Wood present, says President Lincoln, you Mr Cohn are one of these New York prisoners arrested for fraud as to soldiers votes, now if you will make a full statement of all you know about those matters you need not go back to prison but shall be discharged from this moment. Cohn replied that he knew nothing in regard to those matters but what he was willing to tell there or anywhere. Pres Lincoln then repeated what he had said that if Mr Cohn would then state what he knew he should then and there be discharged…Mr Cohn then gave a history of all he had known or see with regard to voting at the NY Agency and elsewhere…When Mr Cohn had completed his statement, President Lincoln said, Mr Cohn I don't see as you have hurt anybody, nor could I if I told the truth, was Mr Cohn's reply. The President then dismissed Cohn and Wood and Cohn started downstairs supposing that he was free according to Pres Lincoln's promise, Oh No, says Wood you will have to go back to prison until your statement is written out for you to sign and then you will be discharged…The McClellan meetings seemed to be the largest and most enthusiastic, a large portion of the soldiers were for little Mac…on one evening the Republicans had a very large torch procession helped greatly by niggers and as it passed up Pennsylvania Avenue one of the helpers at Old Capitol Prison set fire to and burned the large National Flag hanging across the avenue in front of the Democratic Headquarters…Toward the latter part of Oct President Lincoln became quite confident of carrying New York. in cases of outrage in cases calling for sympathy or investigation President Lincoln heard and ears were more open than any member of his cabinet and yet no one democrat nor republican was allowed to approach him in regard to North…President Lincoln was made to see and feel how much he was indebted to the Sewards, Fenton and the few other arch conspirators and to be made a tool of as in Cohn's case…bringing down the dignity of the Presidency to the dirty work of a detective…The President and those below him made such efforts to find or invent something which might be used in getting out of the dilemma…The prosecution had sent its spies all over the state of New York to find if possible some weak point in the characters or records of the Defts…it would be policy not to produce before a court of decent Army officers had stakes its reputation upon being able to prove monstrous frauds as to soldiers votes...one the day the trial was concluded Maj General Doubleday President of the court pronounced the whole thing a farce…Half of Grant's army would have been transferred from Petersburg to Albany, the plans were formed to capture Gov Seymour and only failed in execution, the object was to carry the state for Lincoln and Fenton. Suspicion and doubts were thrown around the democratic soldiers votes sent home…I then took passage for Fortress Monroe with one assistant feeling disposed to fight out the question of a NY agency on that line if it took all summer arriving in James River. We were all stopped by Gen Butler's orders. After being arrested by a lot of drakes as a Virginia rebel because I wore a light gray suit I made my way back to Washington…with six physicians and four assistants and over six hundred dollars in hospital stores I started for City Point intending to establish an agency where New York soldiers would be looked after and cared for some as soldiers of other states…on arriving at City Point obstacles were immediately thrown in the way of landing my good s and storing them. We arrived at City Point in PM of 22nd and were directed back a mile or two to the main camp where are found lodgings in tents. The next morning all of the physicians were ordered to duty as common nurses in various corps hospitals and our six physicians were assigned to duty as such…Our guards kindly marched us aboard the steamboat and with many curses against those who had treated us in that manner…at that time it was decided that I was drunk and sutured the camp and that was the reason for my expulsion…" Overall G+. BIO NOTES: Morven M. Jones fought in the Civil War for the Union in the 2 New York Heavy Artillery Regiment. He entered the war with the rank of 1 Lieut., and left with the rank of 1 Lieut. Company M mustered in December 12, 1861. Jones was the former Chief Clerk Office Secty of State NY; one of the founders and organizers of the Oneida Historical Society; "attorney, autograph collector, and victim of one of the most scandalous political trials of the Civil War." HISTORICAL NOTES: Wiki: Old Capitol Prison, 1861-1867 With the start of the Civil War in 1861, the Union repurchased the building to use as a prison for captured Confederates, as well as political prisoners, Union officers convicted of insubordination, and local prostitutes. Many people arrested following the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln were also held here. These included Dr. Samuel Mudd, Mary Surratt, Louis Weichmann, and John T. Ford, owner of Ford's Theater, where Lincoln was shot. The adjoining row of houses, Duff Green's Row, was also used as part of the prison. Famous inmates of the prison included Rose Greenhow, Belle Boyd, John Mosby, and Henry Wirz, who was hanged in the yard of the prison. 
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1796 - 1801 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF THE NOTED BRITISH 4th BATTALION ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY - OF WHICH PARTS WERE LATER PUBLISHED AS 'VOYAGE TO THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE', RICHARD RENSHAW
14 RICHARD RENSHAW 1796 - 1801 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF THE NOTED BRITISH 4th BATTALION ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY - OF WHICH PARTS WERE LATER PUBLISHED AS 'VOYAGE TO THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE'
MANCHESTER LANCASHIRE UK AFRICA EGYPT 1796 Poor English 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is the original handwritten manuscript "Voyages and Travels of Richard Renshaw" of the British Army's heralded Royal Regiment of Artillery, Renshaw of the 4th Battalion. Some parts of this manuscript were later published as 'VOYAGE TO THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE' in 1804. Renshaw retells in detail and with a keen observer's eye the story of his service for Great Britain. He is an educated man who writes insightful and sometimes rollicking accounts of his and the group's adventures. He describes everything he sees through Africa and into Egypt as part of Admiral Nelson's fleet and the ill-fated, elderly Scot, Lieutenant-General Sir Ralph Abercromby being part of "war reserved for the British nation to annihilate their [Napoleon and the French] ambitious designs their fleet was attacked, defeated and destroyed in Aboukir…" An absolutely incredible first hand account of this robust man's life. Whether dodging buffaloes, doing a bit of amateur archaeology [grave robbing!] in Egypt and he does not hesitate to tell all in this very beaten up and we believe incomplete journal. We also suggest that Richard is writing the diary after the fact as he writes of the near past with near total recall and then seems to catch up to himself in around 1801. Here are snippets from the preface and other short quotes: "Voyages and Travels of Richard Renshaw, Preface. As the following voyages and travels are now made public I think it is proper to lay before the reader a short acct of my life previous to my leaving England. I was born in ManC[hester] in the County of Lancaster and chiefly educated there. My parents in the early part of my life were in affluent circumstances but in consequence of misfortunes in trade in he order of Divine providence they were visited with the bitter cup of adversity my mother being _____ of delicate feelings…. Her constitution was not …and terminated in her death. My Father knowing I had a natural inclination for the army…taking frequent opportunities to lay before me the shocking numbers in the papers of those slain in previous engagements…. I left my fathers house November 1795. I never had the happiness of seeing him after…. Without seriously weighing the circumstance of so important a nature I enlisted in the 4th Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Artillery, the consequence of this step was in the following pages will inform the reader. I embarked aboard the Crescent Frigate at Spithead on the 28th of February 1796 & sailed in company with the Sceptre sixty four and some few transports the 1st of March the wind being tolerable fair…During my time in Africa we trained a Regiment of Hottentots…I was attacked by a buffalo but owing to a small lake…I escaped from him….On the 17th of August we disembarked the Island of Rhoda and joined Major General Baird…On the 12th of December 1801 we marched on Alexandria…. During my stay in Alexandria the plague was raging in an astonishing manner…" Renshaw has made numerous deletions and corrections to the narrative manuscript for future publication. NOTE: Curiously there is one handwritten note, upside down on a blank page titled "Cure for Love" which informs in a rather shaky, aged hand a sad, unhappy verse. The covers are detached but present, the text block in pieces though the narrative is complete from beginning but there are most likely a page or two missing from the end given the way it stops. There is no loss given the narrative begins in 1796 and continues through 1802 over 150 pp or so. The author wrote on the recto pages and saved the verso for later notes, clarifications etc. of which there are many. Truly a one of a kind historical diary of an important period of British Empire's glory. 
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15 ROBERT B. WRIGHT et al MEMBERS OF THE KITCHAWAU TRIBE 1893 MANUSCRIPT LEDGER OF MINUTES, MEMBERS, MEETINGS AND PROCEDURES OF THE ORIGINAL AMERICAN SECRET FRATERNAL SOCIETY FORMED TO HONOR THE NATIVE INDIANS THAT ASSISTED THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARIES AGAINST ENGLAND: THE IMPROVED ORDER OF THE RED MEN
CROTON-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK 1893 Good+ Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a super, original manuscript relic of late 19th Century secret societies and fraternal organizations being an 1893 - 1895 IMPROVED ORDER OF RED MEN TRIBES Minutes Book. The book proper, published specifically for the Club has printed forms for the IMPROVED ORDER OF RED MEN TRIBES. Pages on the left side of the open ledger have a Printed Heading with space for filling in information by hand. The page heading reads: "HUNTING GROUNDS OF", "WIGWAM OF", "TRIBE NO", "IMP. O.R.M.", "SLEEP", and "MOON, G.S.D.4" then below the heading information is printed information for the TRIBE to record Minutes, Activities, Events, the INITIATION OF NEW MEMBERS, etc. Includes such titles as: "Keeper of Wampum", "Application of Paleface", "Record of Previous Council Fire read", "Twig box was opened by", "New Business", "Council Fire was then Quenched", etc. Almost all pages are filled in with various handwritten minutes and notes about the REDMEN meetings, including dates (1893-1895), place (Croton-on-Hudson, New York), events (New Member Induction, Bill needing Payment, Committee Reports, Problem members, General Problems, Plans, Political Stands, etc.). Pinned-on to one of the pages is a 2 page handwritten letter on "Improved Order of Red Men, Wigwam of Kitchawau Tribe No. 237" letterhead. [We cannot help but note that this book and the Society it represents predates the Washington Redskins baseball team controversy declaring the team name racist yet this fraternal organization clearly honors Native Americans and stands as an homage to their tribal attributes. Please read the Wiki article after the description.] The ledger is also a treasure trove of genealogical and social history of the Westchester County area with many, many names of members and their activities. The book has a leather spine and corners, leather edged with gilt, paper title label on front cover, 8.5" x 13.5", pages printed on watermarked paper "Kenilworth", approximately 200-300 unnumbered pages. The front cover is split at its spine fold and is almost disbound. Internally, a couple signatures, including the first, are shaky; one page is loose and is pinned-on to another page, otherwise the pages are quite nice - tight, bright and clean, with writing that is clear and fully legible. HISTORICAL NOTES: Wiki: The Improved Order of Red Men traces its origin to certain secret patriotic societies founded before the American Revolution. They were established to promote Liberty and to defy the tyranny of the English Crown. Among the early groups were: The Sons of Liberty, the Sons of St. Tammany, and later the Society of Red Men. Their rituals and regalia are modeled after those used by Native Americans. The organization claimed a membership of about half a million in 1935, but has declined to less than 38,000. Notable members: Theodore Roosevelt, Warren G. Harding and Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
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c1990s ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY ENGLAND'S MOST INFAMOUS SERIAL KILLER WHO INSPIRED THE CHARACTER HANNIBAL LECTER ADDRESSED TO THE ONE TIME LOVER OF ENGLAND'S MOST NOTORIOUS PRISON INMATE CHARLES BRONSON, ROBERT MAUDSLEY
16 ROBERT MAUDSLEY c1990s ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY ENGLAND'S MOST INFAMOUS SERIAL KILLER WHO INSPIRED THE CHARACTER HANNIBAL LECTER ADDRESSED TO THE ONE TIME LOVER OF ENGLAND'S MOST NOTORIOUS PRISON INMATE CHARLES BRONSON
WAKEFIELD PRISON WEST YORKSHIRE ENGLAND 1995 Very Good Manuscript 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is a sensational, fascinating circa 1990s handwritten letter in a curious unique cursive by Robert Maudsley one of England's most notorious killers a man of such evil intent as to be labelled the original "Hannibal the Cannibal" and whose life has been spent in specially designed prison cells made famous housing the film version of Hannibal in the movie 'Silence of the Lambs'. This 11.5 x 8.5 inch letter is besides being an almost unheard of example of Maudsley's writings it offers a perspective that researchers and historians will find remarkable: this letter was penned to a Canadian woman, Joyce Conner, who was the lover for about 15 years of another of England's most notorious prison inmates - Charles Bronson, aka Michael Peterson, aka Charles Salvador. [Bronson and Conner styled themselves as 'Princess and the Madman' and from this odd pairing Bronson produced voluminous archive of writings which we list separately: Seller ID #000854n.] The 32 line letter on a single sheet of ruled paper is a 400+ word response to Joyce's letter and begins in a manner that actually chills: "Now then Joyce" and then goes on to thank her for her letter and an attached card complimenting her on the graphics of a clipper ship and with humility offering his lack of talent in those areas and he admires anyone who has. He also refers to Bronson, they were still friends then and thus before their noted falling out that Bronson refers to in interviews. In one fascinating comment Maudsley says he never thought of going to Canada where Joyce is but he wishes he could travel the USA and especially a trip to Alcatraz! He then explains to Joyce most of her questions must go unanswered as he does not like to discuss himself too often then simply signed "BOB". Overall VG. 
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1894 - 1896 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT CRUISE NOTES OF THE NOTED USS NEW YORK WHILE COMMANDED BY THE RENOWNED 'FIGHTING BOB' EVANS HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG NAVAL CADET WHO WOULD ONE DAY COMMAND THE USS MAINE AND BE AWARDED THE NAVY CROSS, ROSCOE CHARLES MOODY, U.S.N. ENGINEER DIVISION
17 ROSCOE CHARLES MOODY, U.S.N. ENGINEER DIVISION 1894 - 1896 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT CRUISE NOTES OF THE NOTED USS NEW YORK WHILE COMMANDED BY THE RENOWNED 'FIGHTING BOB' EVANS HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG NAVAL CADET WHO WOULD ONE DAY COMMAND THE USS MAINE AND BE AWARDED THE NAVY CROSS
ASEA ABOARD U.S.S. NEW YORK 1894 Good Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a superb, original late 19th Century manuscript journal detailing a 'shakedown' cruise of the noted USS New York under the command of Robley Dungliston 'Fighting Bob' Evans handwritten and compiled by Naval Cadet Roscoe Charles Moody. This folio book which has approximately 70 pages of entries, notes and observations regarding the running of the ship from a technical perspective. Dated December 1894 to April 1896 there are seven distinct sections and includes several ephemeral items tucked in; 15 printed forms used for checkups on the ship's engines, three pages of handwritten calculations, two oversize sheets of Standard Compass Swinging with Starboard helm and Standard Compass Swinging with post helm includes Mean Deviations and Determination of the Variation, plus 1 blue print of coastal defenses of Havana Cuba. Section 1 covers 27 pages and was examined and approved as 'Excellent' by noted Captain Robley Dungliston 'Fighting Bob' Evans, dated 7 December 1894. This report contains information on the hull, main engines, water service and fire pumps, main feed pumps, as well as other pumps, steering engines, blowers and ventilation, main boiler blower, other boilers, propellers, etc., much information about the ships systems, with diagrams of some of them, plus a longer report headed General Description of Propelling Machinery U.S.S. New York. The other six reports deal with other aspects of the ship and were dated and approved by Captain Evans, as well as Captain Winfield Scott Schley. The reports range between eight to 13 pages, and are dated 7 Jan. 1895; 1 Mar. 1895; 1 Feb. 1896; 2 Mar. 1896, W. S. Schley; and 9 April. We learn from a casual read that the U.S.S. New York was a twin screw armored cruiser and was built and equipped ready for service by the William Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Building Company of Philadelphia, PA, the designs throughout having been furnished by the Navy Department. The contract prize was $2,985,000, and the requirement as to speed was that the vessel should maintain a speed of 20 knot for four consecutive hours with an air pressure in the fire rooms not exceeding 2½ inches of water, it having been further stipulated that a premium of $50,000 should be paid to the contractors for every quarter knot made in excess of this requirement, and that a penalty of $50,000 should be extracted from them for every quarter knot deficiency. Assigned to the South Atlantic Squadron, the New York departed New York Harbor on 27 December 1893 for Rio de Janeiro, arriving at Taipu Beach in January 1894, she remained there until heading home on 23 March, via Nicaragua and the West Indies. Transferred to the North Atlantic Squadron in August, the cruiser returned to West Indian waters for winter exercises and was commended for her aid during a fire that threatened to destroy Port of Spain, Trinidad. Returning to New York, the cruiser joined the European Squadron in 1895, and steamed to Kiel, where she represented the United States at the opening of the Kiel Canal. Rejoining the North Atlantic Squadron, New York operated off Fort Monroe, Charleston, and New York through 1897. The New York departed Fort Monroe on 17 January 1898 for Key West. After the declaration of the Spanish American War in April, she steamed to Cuba and bombarded the defenses at Matanzas before joining other American ships at San Juan in May, seeking the Spanish squadron. Not finding them, they bombarded El Morro Castle at San Juan (12 May) before withdrawing. New York then became the flagship of Admiral William T. Sampson's squadron, as the American commander planned the campaign against Santiago. The Battle of Santiago de Cuba on 3 July resulted in the complete destruction of the Spanish fleet. The cruiser sailed for New York on 14 August to receive a warrior's welcome. The next year, she cruised with various State naval units to Cuba, Bermuda, Honduras, and Venezuela, and conducted summer tactic. There are 17 tipped in illustrations, plus 14 in text illustrations, illustrations are all hand drawn in ink, bound in contemporary half leather, cloth covered boards, lacks spine, boards shaken, corners and edges worn, written in ink, in a legible hand. Overall G. BIO NOTES form one online source: Captain Roscoe Charles Moody (b. 12 Mar 1873, Biddeford, Maine) was the son of Biddeford bank executive Charles A. Moody. Capt. Moody graduated from the US Naval Academy as an engineer in 1894. During World War I he commanded the USS Maine, for which he was awarded the Navy Cross. He served as head of the Dept. of Mathematics at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis. He was very active at the academy, taking part in football, being on both the winning intramural team, and the Navy football team which beat Army that year! He was also in the choir. Moody also spent time teaching at the academy. He published a book called "The Oscillations of Ships" which was used for the instruction of the cadets for years. 
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1951 - 1952 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT TRAVEL DIARY OF A 10,000 MILE EPIC JOURNEY BY TRUCK FROM EUROPE TO SOUTH AFRICA HANDWRITTEN BY A 17 YEAR OLD GIRL MAKING THE TRANS CONTINENTAL TREK WITH HER 20 YEAR OLD BROTHER, SYLVIA BOND-SMITH, [DEREK BOND-SMITH]
18 SYLVIA BOND-SMITH, [DEREK BOND-SMITH] 1951 - 1952 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT TRAVEL DIARY OF A 10,000 MILE EPIC JOURNEY BY TRUCK FROM EUROPE TO SOUTH AFRICA HANDWRITTEN BY A 17 YEAR OLD GIRL MAKING THE TRANS CONTINENTAL TREK WITH HER 20 YEAR OLD BROTHER
KIMBLE ENGLAND AFRICA SAHARA CONGO SOUTH AFRICA 1951 Good+ Manuscript 12mo - over 6¾ 
On offer is a sensational, original manuscript diary that details and documents an epic 10,000 mile journey, by truck for the most part, that begins in Little Kimble, Buckinghamshire, a small town north-west of the Greater London area to Europe and then moves to North Africa across the Sahara through the Belgian Congo to the final destination South Africa. Remarkably the expedition was undertaken by 17 year old Sylvia Bond-Smith, the author, and her 20-year old brother Derek. Driving through much dangerous and wild terrain their difficulties, deprivations and triumphs are retold by this erudite and intrepid traveler in this very detailed journal; from the practical and mundane day to day details of their journey to a wealth of keen eyed and charming observations of this very young woman on the adventure of a lifetime. The 300+ pages or so 7" x 4.5" book is rife with experiences from mileage numbers to describing an elephant and gorilla hunt. Midway Sylvia and her brother meet up with their father who is exploring in the Belgian Congo. Adding further depth to the super narrative are the tipped in and some tucked in ephemera; train tickets, stamps, hotel ephemera, news clippings [the intrepid Smith-Bond siblings meet mid journey two journalists who become attached to the Smith's and document their story: "A boy a girl and a truck and ten thousand miles of adventure. That is the thrilling prospect facing Kimble brother and sister, Derek Bond-Smith 20 and Sylvia 17. Very soon the Bond-Smiths embark on their biggest journey yet - 10,000 miles by truck to Cape Town. Their route lies across 2,000 miles of scorching Sahara - where they will follow a faint track marked every 60 miles by a petrol can through to the steaming Congo, Nigeria, Kenya and down through Tanganyika and Rhodesia."] and a number of hand drawn maps and illustrations litter the journal. With great amusement we read an entry of their accommodations at one point: 'cheap + not very clean but a nice old girl running it' then a later hand a one word note in pencil on the top margin with an arrow to the passage reading 'brothel'. Here are some snippets: Dec 6th, 1951 To the Spanish frontier at La Jungesa - Gathering Kit getting official forms etc we drove on a bit and found a perfect camping site just off the road. Smooth grass and a kind of Oak tree and little cub bushes and mountains all around, very beautiful. Got tent up, and found water from a nearby stream and got meal. While eating too Dutchman came up whose signatures above. Cycling to South Africa so they hope, through Spain and down West Coast of Africa. Algers Laghanek Dec 23rd 1951 Land flat at first than came to Atlas Telliem it became very rocky. Steep rocks very steep road cut right down. Very sleepy and couldn't keep my eyes open for long come out to a plateau passed through Boyhem in village stopped to talk 3 women and two men French bitterly cold stopped for lunch on desolate plain. Dec 30th, 1951 Up at 6:15 supplies very short and all have been hungry for a few days very little breakfast. Jan 4th, 1952 Up at 6 after about 4 hours of sleep got booked in what turned out - to be a very nice place, with running water hot bath, etc. Consists of several buildings and got nice room with bath around corner no sights nets above bed. First we have seen like this. Little would I have thought a year ago I would ever be in Nigeria so far its a very nice place were in now. Not much vegetation , but lots of English colonist about which is pleasant like being home again , only Colonial atmosphere I soon get into a bath, and how I needed one never been so dirty in my life & had a good splash around. Felt really good to be so clean again first time I have had clothes off since we left Alger. Jan 14th, 1952 Up at five it was still dusk found then & Skye sleeping in sleeping because of animals on the road. On road at 6:30 just as sun was rising beautiful sunshine. Saw several groups of guinea fowl several of which Derek blasted away and missed- saw no game - except 3 small Gazelle and two big monkeys. At Kobo we stopped at the road and bought two Pawpaws [papayas?], and stopped for breakfast had my first Pawpaw which was quite good soon after Kapo came upon several cry neatly laid out and constructed villages some buildings still use leaina foundations leashed together with creepers. One deserted village rather impressive. Bush in this area very thick and road narrow. Jan 21st, 1952 Captured several gorillas from the Rinzori mountains - The biggest gorillas in the world - Mal Shot one weighing 1/2 a ton with Teryizi large dimensions & black & hairy & strong It immediately wounded 2 of the natives while itself was wounded and dying on the ground. It grabbed one of them by the hand and flung him for 30 meters and the natives hand stayed in the gorillas grasp his bones crushed like butter. Another native the gorilla hit in the face which was completely torn in two. Jan 25th, 1952 Up at 7 had breakfast than got picked up some of Ron & Skyes kit. Left Stanleyville at 9 after saying goodbye to Ron & Skye which was horrible having come so far with them, Boys at Sebana Hotel - dreadful service bad. Good to be on the road again & walking quietly along Enuno & Ura rivers by and also Tslopo river, and then through Baywaboli - not very big place. Population fairly dense natives all wearing white and proper looking, than around Baywaboli where Govt patrol passed by - Avakabi & over the Kuri river by bicycle - a fast flowing river with lots of flat rocks after Ikani river the forest rather dense - tropical like vegetation all around palms tall trees and think undergrowth 5 monkeys around the road about us about 20 bands bigger baboons & thought for an instant they were gorillas which is quite possible as we are near gorilla county. At Elephant Station at Andudu on Nepoko river. Pygmies are very cruel as regards animals. One way they kill elephants is to smother themselves with the smell of the elephant and creep up on it while its asleep and cut its trunk off, so it cannot eat or drink & is in great pain until it dies in about 4 days." The binding is not great but overall G. 
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1895 - 1930s SUPER, ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF LETTERS, DOCUMENTS AND EPHEMERA BY AN EARLY SETTLER OF TITUSVILLE AND CAPE CANAVERAL FLORIDA, THOMAS Y. KING, ARTHUR KING
19 THOMAS Y. KING, ARTHUR KING 1895 - 1930s SUPER, ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF LETTERS, DOCUMENTS AND EPHEMERA BY AN EARLY SETTLER OF TITUSVILLE AND CAPE CANAVERAL FLORIDA
CAPE CANAVERAL TITUSVILLE FLORIDA FL 1895 Very Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a sensational, original, significant archive of manuscript letters, maps and documents handwritten primarily by Thomas Y. King of Waltham, Massachusetts who was an early pioneer of Canaveral Florida well before the area achieved fame as Cape Canaveral the launching pad to some of America's greatest dreams and accomplishments and even tragedies. In the late 1800s the Cocoa Beach - Titusville region was an essentially unpopulated, forested place. With the dream that the port at Cape Canaveral, due to its depth and overall excellence, would make him millions, Thomas Y. King, in 1895, came from Waltham Massachusetts bought a parcel of land on the beach of what is now the Port St. John region between Titusville and Cocoa [Section 6-7, Township #23, Range 38 East of Tallahassee Meridian, Brevard County] and built a crude house, farm and eventually a road leading out to Titusville that would serve him until the 1930s. [This road was later renamed King's Highway and is a busy thoroughfare in Titusville today.] He also built the first schoolhouse the area had in 1896. He and his son lived there until they returned to Waltham in 1900 and then 21 years later they returned permanently after he retired. Much of the archive involves the correspondence he maintained with his brother: 200+ letters, approximately 350 handwritten pages making for an unparalleled look into life in the region by an erudite, observant pioneer with perfect timing given the land boom there in the 1920s. After his death in the late 1930s, his son, Arthur King, began to write down what he remembered of those very early days. He drew a map of the 10 or so people who were his father's neighbors, described the first schooling down there after his father built the schoolhouse, and contacted the Space/Science writer Martin Caiden, who was writing a book on the area in 1958. He provided Mr Caiden with very important information on the pioneer period, for which Mr Caiden wrote him back, thanking him for the great information he was provided. INVENTORY: 200+ handwritten letters totalling 350 pages written from 1921-1933, from Canaveral to his brother in Waltham; 1896 US Government General Land Office Homestead Land Grant Certificate selling said land to Thomas Y. King signed by President Grover Cleveland (Secretary signed); Certificate Of Title for these lands issued by Brevard Abstract Title Ins Co Titusville, and over 15 maps of these land plots; 3 Warranty Deeds selling land owned by Thomas Y. King to Livingston Vann, George Kimball, and the Desoto Beach Improvement Co of Orlando (1925-1930); 20+ pages of handwritten reminiscences written by the son of Thomas Y. King, Arthur N. King, to writer Martin Caiden documenting life in Canaveral in 1894-1895, when he attended the first school there, and watched and helped his father buy and build and farm what was among the first standing structures in the region. It includes two hand drawn maps: 1 of Thomas King's house, the other a map of the first settlers of Canaveral, among whom were Shorty Johnson and Captain Penney (who built the first pier there), his immediate neighbors, who were the first to settle the area. It also includes a thank you letter from Caiden issued on his letterhead. Overall VG. 
Price: 4485.99 USD
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1920s ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF DOCUMENTS, DRAFT NOVELS, MANUSCRIPTS AND OTHER RELATED EPHEMERA OF AN ENGLISHMAN LIVING IN NORTHERN ALBERTA WHO AUTHORED A NUMBER OF NOVELS BASED ON HIS EXPERIENCES AND OBSERVATIONS OF THE 'WILDERNESS TO THE EAST OF THE ROCKIES', TOM BROWN TIVEY
20 TOM BROWN TIVEY 1920s ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF DOCUMENTS, DRAFT NOVELS, MANUSCRIPTS AND OTHER RELATED EPHEMERA OF AN ENGLISHMAN LIVING IN NORTHERN ALBERTA WHO AUTHORED A NUMBER OF NOVELS BASED ON HIS EXPERIENCES AND OBSERVATIONS OF THE 'WILDERNESS TO THE EAST OF THE ROCKIES'
EDMONTON ALBERTA AB CANADA NEAR ARCTIC 1925 Good+ Manuscript 4to - over 9¾ 
Offered is a super, original literary and personal archive of Tom Brown Tivey (1895-1966) who emigrated to Canada after the WWI, working on the Alberta Great Waterways Railway, who homesteaded and taught north of Edmonton before returning to the UK in 1929 where he published four novels inspired by his time in Alberta. Historians and researchers of the time and place have a unique opportunity to delve into the history Tivey experienced: the archive includes several folders of manuscript material (800 or so pages) which includes two drafts of Tom Brown Tivey's debut novel 'Trapline, A Tale of the North', under earlier titles including Lonely Trail (Chapters 1-VI) and A Tale of the North (Chapters 1-XIV) [editor's note: Trapline was set in the 'wilderness to the east of the Rockies in Northern Canada' and tells the story of Kathleen Barlow's attempts to protect her father's gold strike against rivals and potential lovers]; extensive manuscript notes, a full length unpublished Canadian-set novel titled 'Nameless River' and ephemera including: publishing and royalty statements; photos; teaching records; testimonials; Canadian Teaching Qualifications; Teaching Contract with Province of Alberta etc. Additionally first editions published by Herbert Jenkins of 'When Daylight Dies', 'Riddle of the Snows' (inscribed) and 2 x Marenka of Monterey, 1 copy inscribed in dustjacket. Overall G+. 
Price: 6855.99 USD
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