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1 THOMAS HENRY DAVIES 1781 - 1786 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTERS COPY BOOK OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY SOON TO BE ADVOCATE GENERAL DETAILING THE TRADE, COMMERCE, ECONOMY, POLITICS AND PERSONAL PASSIONS OF 'JOHN COMPANY'S' MAN ON THE ASIAN SUB-CONTINENT
CALCUTTA INDIA ASIAN SUBCONTINENT MADRAS 1781 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is an original, significant manuscript relic of British colonial history, 18th Century global trade and commerce and one English man's climb up the corporate ladder within one of the most powerful corporate entities in British history being a 1781 through 1786 letters copy book [titled "COPY BOOK - EUROPE LETTERS"] of the East India Company handwritten by Thomas Henry Davies [1751-1792]. Approximately 350 pages of letters written by Davies and a secretary, no doubt, the copy book allows for a remarkable historic opportunity to witness the record of correspondence in these letters originating from Davies or in response to letters sent to him providing a rare insight to the trade, commerce, economy and the fascinating politics between the East Indies and Britain as many of the letters are much concerned with Davies' worries over his position in the East India Company and dissatisfaction with his treatment. He is also much taken up with matters involving his parents and various financial arrangements that he has to organise from a long distance. A court martial is written of (though not Davies'.) He is much gratified when he is eventually promoted to Advocate General in 1785. [A portrait of him was painted by the noted portrait artist Johann Zoffany.] While the destination of the letters is not always stated the vast majority have been sent to the U.K. Davies was on friendly terms with Warren Hastings, and the book contains several letters sent to him. Most of the letters are dated and give the name of the ship by which there were being taken to the U.K. Here are some snippets: "The example the court of directory have lately shewn in reducing Sir John Day's salary to its original standard, as well as the jealousy with which they view everything that looks an increase of expense in the Law Dept." To Warren Hastings: "I was concerned to hear that on yr arrival in England you was not quite well and that the state of your health had made a visit to Cheltenham necessary." Letter to James Poole of Lincoln's Inn Fields: Davies arranges for Capt. Johnston of the Bessington to arrange for 5 Butts of Madeira to be sent to him. Letter of December 1784: "a very extraordinary charge…against Mr Thomas by Mr Barlow to the Commander in Chief who had him put under arrest and he is now taking his trial before a Court Martial." The 9 x 7x 1.5 inch book has covers slightly bowed and crack between hinges towards back of book but overall is G+. 
Price: 8250.99 USD
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2 HENRY SNEVELY (or SNAVELY) 1802 - 1803 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF MATHEMATICS, GEOMETRY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MORE, GEARED TOWARDS THE IRISH IMMIGRANTS NEW TO THE SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA TOWNSHIP
BETHEL TOWNSHIP, LEBANON COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 1802 Good Manuscript 
On offer is an interesting document of early 19th century education, an original, handwritten note book covering a myriad of subjects related to mathematics. The owner and creator of this book was a man named Henry Snevely (also written as Snavely) and the book dates from 1802 - 1803. It seems Snevely was born in the United States and lived his whole life in Southeastern Pennsylvania. At the time of the creation of the book, Snevely was almost 50 years old, an established land owner in Bethel Township, Lebanon County. Why he had a book of mathematics is unknown, however, I have found records of a Henry Snavely, who taught at a school in Bethel Township from 1797 onwards. It may be likely that this book is actual not for Henry himself, but for the instruction of his students. Either way, the book presents a fantastic overview of early 18th century knowledge. The book covers a very large range of topics, however, Math pertaining to financial matters is dominant throughout. As well, there are conversions of Irish and British currency. The primary immigrants to the area at the time of the book were indeed Scotch-Irish, so teaching Irish and British currency conversions wouldn’t be too far off. Currency exchange in particular is a primary focus, owing to the large amount of immigrants to the area. Individual page headings in the book include “Exchange” (many pages), ”Exchange of Arbitrations”, ”Barter”, ”Profit and ”Loss, ”Fellowship”, ”Fellowship with Time”, ”Allegation Media”, ”Alternate, Partial, and Total,” ”Square Root”, ”Cube Root”, ”Arithmetical and Geometric Progression”, ”Compound Interest,” ”Single and Double Position,” ”Reduction,” ”Addition,” ”Subtraction,” ”Multiplication,” and ”Division of Fractions and Vulgar Fractions”, ”Rule of Three in Fractions,” and ”Questions for Exercise.” There is a later manuscript memorandum on rear endpaper dated 1829, bearing the names of additional members of the Pennsylvania Snavely clan, Molly, George, and John. The name Martin Rupp also appears in memorandum, and our research confirms various Martin Rupps residing in southeastern Pennsylvania during this time. The book is in fair to good condition. The volume is bound in the original stiff paper wraps. The cover is very worn and the spine is torn and partially detached. There is mild age-toning and occasional staining, but the internal pages are generally clean. The black ink is still bold and easily legible throughout. The book contains about 85 pages of manuscript entries, and the book itself is approximately 90 pages. It measures 12.5” x 8” inches. (Biography: Henry Snavely was born on August 2, 1755 in Bethel Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. “...Henry Snavely was a Lutheran. At that time he was considered a good scholar and is said to have been a hard student, obtaining his knowledge principally by his own exertion. He taught the school from 1797 to 1807.”; A report from 1773 shows his farm had 150 acres, 5 horses, 4 cattle and no servants.) OVERALL: G 
Price: 3055.99 USD
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3 CAPT. HENRY HAWKINS, GEORGE HAWKINS 1810 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LOG AND LEDGER OF A BUSY COMMERCIAL SHIP TRYING TO PLY IT'S TRADE IN THE INCREASINGLY DANGEROUS WATERS FACED BY AMERICAN SHIPPING FROM THE BRITISH NAVY AS COASTAL WATERS AND THE ATLANTIC CROSSING HEAT UP AS THE WAR OF 1812 LOOMS
ABOARD SHIP PEGU PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA 1810 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a fascinating, original War of 1812 era ship's ledger through whose historic entries reveal the hazards for a merchant ship to ply its trade in open waters as this log dated March of 1810 to Sept 1811 for the Philadelphia based vessel "Pegu" reveals through its 130 or so well-filled pages which also includes a number of ephemeral items: invoices, bills of lading, letter copies of correspondence to shippers from principals Captain Henry Hawkins and his son George Hawkins who ply their trade to London, Halifax, Gottenburg etc. adding further depth. What will be of particular interest to historians and collectors of nautical history is that along with the ship's commercial business aspects highlighted with the back drop of impending War between America and Britain is the war between Son and Father. Beyond the data, beyond the significant notes even casual reading finds entries to include: "Ship captured by English Sloop" (June 1810), another chilling, near prescient entry discusses blockades and "If War Should Take Place" (Aug 1811) there are letters from Hawkins the Son to his father that have a beseeching quality for connection and contact. Yes there is business but there is a young man reaching out to his father for more. The rear cover of the 7 3/4" x 10" oblong book is detached, the front holding by a single string, the spine cap tattered and some general ageing but interiors are good. 
Price: 3855.99 USD
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4 HENRY GUEST BLISS 1834 + 1837 ORIGINAL GROUP OF FIVE [5] LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG MASSACHUSETTS MAN SEEKING INVESTMENT AND EMPLOYMENT IN ALABAMA ONLY TO MAKE AN ILL ADVISED MOVE TO TEXAS
WETUMPKA, ALABAMA 1834 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a super group of five [5] manuscript letters, eight pages or so, four [4] dated 1834 Wetumpka Alabama and one [1] dated 1827 Columbia Texas though referencing Alabama, handwritten by H. G. Bliss [Henry Guest Bliss (1807-1837) b. West Springfield, Massachusetts, d. Texas, 1837] to his brother Luke. The young, 26 in 1834, ill-fated Mr. Bliss lives, works and wishes to invest in Wetumpka during the authorship of these letters but he proves a restless sort and by 1837 he has relocated to Texas only to meet his early death. While in Wetumpka he appears to have been employed in a merchant house. "This is a new place and most people think it will grow very fast as it is at the head of St. Boat navigation. We have had three boats up within the last week...large with splendid cabins." With near seeming prescience he also comments on his foreboding for the future, ill health, buying Wetumpka land and going to Texas. In the one and a half page May 29, 1837 letter he writes of "distressing times in the U States." "I am living in the oldest mercantile house in the country and get good wages. Our trade is very heavy. We are at the head of Ship navigation on the Brasos." "I should like to see the country once settled under a good Government. We should increase in population & wealth faster than any of the new states at the west." He goes on to write that he wants to sell his Wetumpka Alabama property "to lay it out in negroes while they are cheap." 
Price: 2255.99 USD
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5 SENATOR HENRY MEYERS 1838 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER BY THE SENATOR FROM PENNSYLVANIA WHO PULLS OUT ALL THE STOPS AND HELPS A WIDOW'S SON LAUNCHING THE CAREER OF A FUTURE ADMIRAL AND HERO OF THE CIVIL WAR PIERCE CROSBY JR.
WASHINGTON [DC] 1838 Very Good Autograph
On offer is a super relic of American naval history being an original manuscript letter from Pennsylvania state Senator Henry Myers to Sec. of Navy Mahlon Dickerson urging Pierce Crosby's appointment as a Midshipman. Crosby would later go on to become a Navy Rear Admiral who played important roles in the Civil War commanding several ships and serving as Fleet Captain of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. This letter has remarkable content, as Myers "pulled out all the stops". Dated March 28, 1838 from the Senate chamber, this very full one page 8vo goes on to state: "I last evening received a letter from Mrs. Catherine A. Crosby, a widow lady of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, who is desirous to procure a Midshipman's Warrant for her son Peirce Crosby, Jr. Should you have it in your power to grant her request, it will be acting in accordance with the scripture injunction to remember the widow and the fatherless. The youth is a very promising one, and descended on both sides from substantial Whigs and heroes of the revolution, (not modern Whigs who were the peace party in war and the war party in peace) and through the exertions of his widowed mother is forward in his education. And my Dear Sir, if you will revert to the history of our country and the biography of her great men, you will find that many of them (including the immortal Washington) were tutored under similar circumstances, and the first impulses to an honorable ambition instilled by maternal affection. We may boast of our love of country and attachment to our free institutions, but in all this we are generally selfish; but from the female bosom emanated a more pure and holy patriotism. I do hope therefore you will be enabled to grant this lady's request. With sentiment of profound respect, Your humble Servant, Henry Myers". Such an appeal would be hard to resist - Less than 3 months later, Crosby was appointed Midshipman and began an illustrious career! Note that this was 7 years before the Naval Academy was established.VG. 
Price: 1255.99 USD
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6 HENRY C. CHAUNCEY 1843 ORIGINAL HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LETTER [ALS] REGARDING THE KILLING OF MRS. BACON 'AND THE WRETCHES THEY HAVE CAUGHT' HANDWRITTEN BY A HARVARD MAN TO A WASHINGTON COLLEGE FRIEND
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS CAMBRIDGE MA HARTFORD CT. 1843 Hard Cover Very Good+ 
On offer is a super 3-1/2 pp handwritten manuscript letter [ALS], dated Harvard University, Oct. 8th, 1843, having a stampless cover addressed to Sam. F. Jarvis at Washington College in Hartford, Conn., with a red Cambridge postal cancel, reading in part: "... Frequent the company of females, well informed & of your rank in society... pay some attention to married ladies, whose conversation is not only improving, but will also raise the sex in your estimation... My Aunt Clara writes me that they think in Middletown that they have caught the wretches [Hall, Roberts, & Bell were all implicated in this notorious 19th century crime] that killed Mrs. Bacon. May they be caught & hung. Capital punishment has been abolished in Connecticut, so that the ruffians will only be sentenced to the State Prison for life. If, when they are condemned, the mob would break into the jail, seize them & after pouring tar all over them should make a bonfire of them, I should think that the mob were right, & I feel as if I could almost join in such an act. It seems to be the most shocking that I ever heard of...[much more on his views of women, dating]." Signed Henry C. Chauncey. Folded 8 x 10 inch sheet with a small tear/ hole affects three words, paperclip stain, otherwise VG. 
Price: 485.99 USD
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7 Colonel Henry Whipple 1852 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DOCUMENT SIGNED DETAILING EARLY BOOK BUY BY FAMED BOOKSELLER HENRY WHIPPLE
Salem, Massachusetts MA 1852 Very Good Manuscript 
Original 1852 manuscript document signed being a "Bookseller List ', (Salem, Mass). Bookseller list of items sold to Henry Whipple for books and items purchased from James Chaney. List of books purchased in 1851 include: 1 Lynds Etymology (thirty one cents); 1 Moorland's Cottage; 1 Proverbial Philosophy; 1 Penknife - James; 3 Nautical Almanacs; 1 German Without a Master; Paper 06 White Mountain Guide; Longfellow's Hyperion; Envelopes." Signed H. Whipple, Jan. 14, 1852. Henry Whipple was a bookseller in Salem Mass on Newbury Street. BIO NOTES: "Colonel Henry Whipple, who is remembered as one of our best citizens, kept, in connection with his bookstore, a "Fortunate Lottery Office." (From The Olden Time Series, Vol. 1: Curiosities of the Old Lottery, Gleanings Chiefly from Old Newspapers of Boston and Salem, Massachusetts, Henry M. Brooks). One source notes his bookseller business from 1851-1860 was Henry Whipple & Son. Very early for the White Mountain Guide, as well as the other mid 19th Century books on his list. Unique & Scarce. Fold marks, some bleed-through from pen on back. Mostly Fine Condition. 
Price: 329.99 USD
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8 HENRY BEDLOW 1854 HANDWRITTEN ALS BY FAMED DEAD SEA EXPLORER
1854 Manuscript Very Good 
[DEAD SEA EXPEDITION] HENRY BEDLOW - member of the 1849 United States Expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. This naval expedition was led by Lieut. W.F. Lynch plus 13 naval men. Henry Bedlow, Esq., and Henry J. Anderson, M.D., were with the Expedition as volunteers. Lynch wrote in his Narrative "More zealous, efficient, and honourable associates could not have been desired. They were ever in the right place, bearing their full share of watching and privation. To the skill of Mr. Bedlow, the wounded seaman was indebted for the preservation of his life; and words are inadequate to express how in sickness, forgetful of himself, he devoted all his efforts to the relief of his sick companions." Anderson left the expedition and Bedlow took over medical duties, he having studied medicine at one time. Offered here is an ALS, 1854, 1p, no place mentioned, to H.P. Beck. Courteous letter explaining how the correspondent's letter had miscarried and was found by one of the laborers under a Lilac tree on the lawn. Dead Sea association written in ink in unknown hand and could be separated from letter if desired. Very uncommon exploration autograph. VG condition. 
Price: 449.99 USD
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9 Henry Ripley Millett 1856 & 1857 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DIARIES BY THE SON OF A DISTINGUISHED MAINE FAMILY WHO GOES ON TO GREAT PERSONAL FAME FOR HIS SERVICE IN THE CIVIL WAR WITH THE 5TH MAINE REGIMENT
LEEDS GOREHAM MAINE CAMPELLO MASS MA 1856 Good+ Autograph
On offer are two mid 19th century, pre Civil War, handwritten manuscript diaries dated from 1856 and 1857 and both belonged to Henry Ripley Millett who was originally from Leeds and Gorham Maine. Henry had quite a distinguished background and would also come to distinguish himself as Colonel Millett of the 5th Maine Regiment during the civil war. [Henry Millett was the cousin of Frank D. Millet, the artist, who was director of decorations for the 1893 Chicago World's Fair Columbian Exposition.] Henry was born in Leeds on September 23rd, 1832. He was the son of Thomas and Elmira A. Day Millet. His great-grandfather, Thomas Millet was a patriot soldier in the revolution. Henry received a good education in the common schools of Palmyra and St. Albans. In 1851 when he was 19 years old he went to Campello Massachusetts and worked in a shoe factory and this is where the diaries pick up, while he's in Campello. He stayed in there until about 1858, headed home to Gorham and in 1861 enlisted in Company A, 5th Maine Regiment, Sixth Corps, Second Brigade, First Division. Online resources provide: "He served with distinguished bravery in some of the most momentous engagements of the war, including the first battle of Bull Run, West Point, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Salem Heights, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Rappahannock Station, Spotsylvania Court house, Cold Harbor [where his brother Obed was killed], the second battle of Bull Run, the second engagement at Fredericksburg, and Gaine's Mill…." He was wounded numerous times during some of these battles, but also that he went home "loaded with honors." After the war he married in 1870 to M. Antoinette, daughter of Freeman Whitney of Portland. The 1856 diary is about ½ full of handwritten entries, the 1857 diary only has 300+ days. Here are some snippets - and some are shocking: "Steel not this book, the fear of your life. For the owner carries a great big knife." 1856 "January 21st, I haven't Nig-er killed eny today." "January 22nd, Today the boys have all gorne on a sleigh ride. Started about 5 o'clock p.m. They numbered 15 sleighs. Came in about 3 a.m." "February 6th, This morning I have been to a fire up to the village. The colored saloon burnt. We had a pretty hard time." "February 17th, I am now writing in the Quincy House, Boston. I came in yesterday and have had a first rate time. Went to ___way's Hall last evening." "February 22nd, This is Washington's birthday and is memory of that great man. All bells was rung this morning at sunrise." "March 25th & 26th, This evening I have been down to Mrs. Watson's. I wished on Amandie's ring for 3 months……Amanda I wish you a happy life and success in all your undertakings….." "March 27th, Sailed today, the ship Savannah bound for New Orleans. Samuel L. Millett 2nd officer." "April 7th, I ame now writing with my book on Henrietter's lap. I am having a first rate time. I wish that I could always be as happy as I am now." "May 22nd, Today I have started for Plymouth. I am now safely loged in the Monument House." "August 29th, O how meny times in my life I have thought of what now appears to be the fact. That sometime sooner or later we must all-----" "August 30th, This is a very long and lonesome evening to me. I am some times on the point of leaving Campello for sum distant land but one thing keeps me here." "September 26th, I am now performing at the husking at the Widow Tibett's. I have just done justice to the supper table." "October 17th, Spent the evening at L.M.W. had a good time, never was happier in my life than when I am there when Henretta is pleasant." "November 1st, We have had a strong S.W. wind to day. The anticipated trouble has at last arrived and I am bound to -------" "November 4th, Election day. Town, country and state election day. I have cast my first presidential vote today with a clear conscious." "December 26th, This evening I have hurd some thing that I did not expect to hear. My mind is at changed and I shall take a different course." 1857 "January 1st, Today is the first day in the year and I must try to do what is right and then I shall be happy and if I live to see the end of this year I hope I shall look upon it with pleasure and not with regret." "January 3rd, Today I left Campello for Boston with a horse & sleigh accompanied by A. C. Ambrose. It has snowed all day." "January 29th, Pleasant. Mother died this morning at 9 ½ o'clock." "February 26th, Pleasant. Have been meditating on the idea of leaving Campello. I am lonely in this place now and think I shall leave if I can do as well in any other place." "March 25th, Have been to work today but it is rather lonesome. I some times think that this world is a blank to me for I never receive any comfort from it." "March 26th, I have been thinking of past times today and so judging from what I have experienced I think that the future looks dark." "April 4th, I am now at the Mansion. Here I am 10 o'clock at the Mansion House, just going to bed to dream if what I have seen this morning. May your dreams be pleasant." "April 28th, Have been to take a short ride this evening. Went to the east. Lucy is here yet and I am in love, love on, love ever." "June 3rd, Pleasant. I watched with the corpse last night. G. J. Kingman and ____ Davis Jr." "June 9th, I left Campello today at N. for Portland on an excursion with the Enterprise Engine on No. 2." "June 24th, I have been up town this afternoon. Got my ambrotype taken but it looked so bad that I smashed it before I got home." "July 28th, I left Campello this morn for quarantine. Boston to asertain the perticulars in regards to the death of my brother which occurred on the 9th." "August 17th, No. ___have been up to the West Sharon today. We had a siport dinner and speeches from N. B. Drake, Capt. Lucas, Capt. H. Capt. Clappe and others." "September 12th, A sad accident happened here today. A little Irish boy got his skull broke." "September 24th, Fire last night. The alarm was given between 11 & 12 o'clock. L. T. Howard's house and barn and other out buildings was completely burned." "October 4th, Great excitement here today. Grease pig chase and foot rase. John Sears and Morton Copland prize." "November 4th, I left Campello this morn, arrived in Boston, stopped there until 5 p.m. then left for Portland on board the steamer Lewiston." Much much more including handwritten expense entries in the back and then several of the pages are used like an autograph book where friends and acquaintances have signed and written some kind of sentiment. Overall G+. 
Price: 2469.99 USD
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10 COLONEL HENRY FANSHAWE DAVIES 1861 + 1864 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARIES [2] HANDWRITTEN BY AN ENGLISH SPORTS MAN AND SOLDIER OF THE GRENADIER GUARDS FILLING HIS DAYS COURTING DEAR CHRISTINE, HORSE RACING, FOX HUNTING AND AT THE TOWER OF LONDON
London England 1861 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a super pair [2] of original manuscript 1861 + 1864 diaries handwritten by Colonel H[enry] F[anshawe] Davies [1837-1914]; [the former owner has identified the owner as Davies and we note handwriting in a related, identified diary is a close match to specifically identify the Colonel as author]. Most of the content is of a personal nature [he often refers to his courtship of "dear Christine" who he later marries], elite play and travel, races, hunting, mention of the Prince, details of a St Leger horse burned to death in a railway accident, Cricket scores, death/funeral of Prince Albert plus details of hunts and steeplechases. The writer also spends a great deal of time at the Tower of London obviously related to the Grenadier Guards with whom Davies served. The 1861 book is well filled, but the 1864 stops almost completely after May. The Letts' Rough is very worn along the backstrip but overall both are G+. 
Price: 2455.99 USD
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11 HENRY CABOT LODGE, SCHUYLER COLFAX, JOHN HAY, CHARLES ELIOT, FRANCIS PARKMAN, HENRY ADAMS et al 1861 - 1896 LARGE ARCHIVE OF ORIGINAL AUTOGRAPH LETTERS [76] SIGNED [ALS], HISTORICAL CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTS AND EPHEMERA SENT TO FRANCIS AMASA WALKER NOTED CIVIL WAR GENERAL, YALE ECONOMIST AND PRESIDENT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY [MIT]
AMHERST MASSACHUSETTS 1861 Very Good 
On offer is a super, large archive of circa 1861 - 1896 historical manuscript letters, documents and ephemera all providing an interesting and intimate look into the work, life and academic affairs of Francis Amasa Walker (1840-1897) noted Civil War general, Yale economist, Superintendent of the 1880 census, and President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology [MIT]. He was the son of renowned economist Amasa Walker. (A brief biography is at the end of this listing.) The archive is comprised 76 autograph letters signed [ALSs] received and 14 Civil War documents, most signed as follows: A) His correspondence encompasses academics, politicians, military leaders, and literary figures. Some of the many prominent correspondents included in this archive are: Schuyler Colfax (2 letters as Vice President), John Tyndall, Henry Fawcett, Henry Cabot Lodge, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, poet Thomas B. Aldrich (3 letters), Nelson Miles, John Hay, William Dean Howells, Harvard president Charles W. Eliot (2), sculptor Daniel Chester French, historian Francis Parkman, Henry Adams sent two substantial letters, including a detailed 1878 commentary on the silver question, his brother Charles Francis Adams Jr. began his 1883 note "I am one of those fools who use yachts," and invited Walker along for a long cruise, Samuel Chapman Armstrong, who wrote in 1888 on his efforts to hire a carpentry instructor at his Hampton Institute to provide marketable skills to his students, British historian George O. Trevelyan, in response to one of Walker's Civil War histories, wrote "I never before appreciated the appalling dangers and efforts," adding that the battles "tell a story that stands alone and makes me really proud of what is, after all, my race." B) 14 documents from Walker's Civil War service as Adjutant General to Generals Couch and Hancock. C) The Walker family autograph collection: 30 items including clipped signatures of James A. Garfield and Booker T. Washington. All are sleeved in massive 3-ring binder; generally well-preserved, small mount remnants on verso of many items. BIO NOTES: From one online source: Francis Amasa Walker was a statistician, journalist, educator, academic administrator, and military officer in the Union Army. Walker was born into a prominent Boston family, the son of the economist and politician Amasa Walker, and he graduated from Amherst College at the age of 20. He received a commission to join the 15th Massachusetts Regiment of Volunteers and quickly rose through the ranks as an assistant adjutant general. Walker fought in the Peninsula Campaign and was injured at the Battle of Chancellorsville but subsequently participated in the Bristoe, Overland, and Richmond-Petersburg Campaigns before being captured by Confederate forces and held at the infamous Libby Prison. In July 1866, he was nominated by President Andrew Johnson and confirmed by the United States Senate for the award of the honorary grade of brevet brigadier general United States Volunteers, to rank from March 13, 1865, when he was age 24. Following the war, Walker served on the editorial staff of the Springfield Republican before using his family and military connections to gain appointment as the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics from 1869 to 1870 and Superintendent of the 1870 census where he published an award-winning Statistical Atlas visualizing the data for the first time. He joined Yale University's Sheffield Scientific School as a professor of political economy in 1872 and rose to international prominence serving as a chief member of the 1876 Philadelphia Exposition, American representative to the 1878 International Monetary Conference, President of the American Statistical Association in 1882, and inaugural President of the American Economic Association in 1886, and vice president of the National Academy of Sciences in 1890. Walker also led the 1880 census which resulted in a twenty-two volume census, cementing Walker's reputation as the nation's preeminent statistician. As an economist, Walker debunked the wage-fund doctrine and engaged in a prominent scholarly debate with Henry George on land, rent, and taxes. Although Walker argued that obligations existed between the employer and the employed, he was an opponent of the nascent socialist movement and argued in support of bimetallism. He published his International Bimetallism at the height of the 1896 presidential election campaign in which economic issues were prominent. Walker was a prolific writer, authoring ten books on political economy and military history. In recognition of his contributions to economic theory, beginning in 1947, the American Economic Association recognized the lifetime achievement of an individual economist with a "Francis A. Walker Medal". Walker accepted the presidency of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1881, a position he held for fifteen years until his death. During his tenure, he placed the institution on more stable financial footing by aggressively fund-raising and securing grants from the Massachusetts government and implemented many curricular reforms, oversaw the launch of new academic programs, and expanded the size of the Boston campus, faculty, and student enrolments. MIT's Walker Memorial Hall, a former students' clubhouse and one of the original buildings on the Charles River campus, was dedicated to him in 1916. 
Price: 9985.99 USD
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12 HENRY ______ 1868 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTERS COPYBOOK/TRAVEL DIARY BY A BRITISH SOLDIER ON HIS WAY TO INDIA SHARING INTIMATE DETALS WITH HIS MATER, PATER AND KITTY
SS MEMPHIS HMS EUPHRATES THE FORT ALLAHABAD INDIA 1868 Fair+ Manuscript 
On offer is a very interesting, original 1868 manuscript diary handwritten by a British army officer signing himself Henry who details through exact copies of his letters to his Mother, Father and Kitty a diary like journal with approximately 75+ pages [there has been some loss to the first section of the book but included are pages 73 - 80, then pages 89 - 160 are complete] his time aboard a number of ships including the SS Memphis, the HMS Crocodile and the HMS Euphrates and ends with a letter from 'The Fort' Allahabad Jan 26 1870. This journal will be of particular interest to researchers and historians of England's time in Colonial India and the travels, society and relations between the British and their colonial subjects. Henry describes his life and times minutely for his family. Here aare some snippets: "We are now in about the hottest part of the Red Sea , & where white people feel the heat more, I believe, than anywhere afloat - the heat was very bad last night & we lost a man from apoplexy - there is no chaplain aboard this ship but the captain read the service today - Aden is a very curious looking place - Bombay Harbour Nov 13 anchored 10 am - the destination of the regmt ...is to be Cowpore - I like India , it is certainly a wonderful, wealthy country - I believe I shall have 6 servants as each man will only do one thing, the first servant is one's Kitmagar or Butler ; the next is one's bearer, who looks after one's clothes - not having our mess it is much dearer living - I never saw anything like the number and variety of birds, beautiful parrots of all colours which make such a horrid screeching, and no end of hawks , and birds of the vulture tribe which keep our camp clean , foul looking birds some of them are too - killed a fine hare with the little single , a great big fox jumped up , looked at me and trotted off - no hounds here - there is scarcely any gold in the country one always gets rupees , they are the same as florins - I have got most of my servants; only my bearer can speak English; they are a curious looking lot." He book is in rough shape given the trauma of sections of the first part of the book missing but the pages in the 6. 3/4 inches x 4 1/2 are in great shape and very legible in Henry's precise hand. Overall F+. 
Price: 2295.99 USD
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13 FREDERICK HENRY ADAMS 1878 SUPER, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT RELIC OF OLD SAN FRANCISCO POLITICS AND THEATER AND LUCKY SURVIVOR OF THE CATASTROPHIC 1906 EARTHQUAKE
San Francisco, California CA 1878 Fair Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original 1878 manuscript relic of San Francisco history being a comedy play staged in five acts handwritten by Frederick Henry Adams. [Tucked in is an official Library of Congress Copyright Office Washington declaring in February 1878 that Frederick Henry Adams holds copyright.] The play takes place at the original Palace Hotel in San Francisco in 1876 and is about collapse of the Comstock Lode and references many politicians of the day. The book is entirely handwritten, at least 100 pages there are apart from the play proper other handwritten notes; corrections to names in the cast, general observations etc. However we cannot determine of these were by Adams or perhaps a future producer, director or actor of the production. While the book proper is not in the best of shape being completely dis-bound for the most part the leather covers present but very worn and detached, we cannot help remind ourselves that this treasure of native San Francisco theater is a survivor of the terrible earthquake of 1906 and the massive destruction throughout the city. Overall Fair. 
Price: 2055.99 USD
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14 COLONEL HENRY FANSHAWE DAVIES 1879 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL AND LEDGER HANDWRITTEN BY AND FOR A COLONEL OF THE FAMED GRENADIER GUARDS RIGHT IN THE THICK OF THE ANGLO ZULU WAR
FORT MARSHALL ZULU KINGDOM SOUTH AFRICA 1879 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original 1879 manuscript relic of British colonial campaigns being a journal and ledger regarding the Anglo-Zulu War fought between the Zulu Empire and Britain. The 8.5 x 5.5 inch approximately 250 page book is handwritten by Colonel H[enry] F[anshawe] Davies [1837-1914] of the famed Grenadier Guards [see BIO NOTES] with some entries in another hand details the Campaign from the mundane and practical to the historically significant. The book begins with a four page index and table of contents with page numbers. Entries on the contents pages include "to know what coal has been collected", "letter respecting drunkenness in camp", "oxen sent to Koppie Alleine", "escort duty between F.N. (?) and Fort Marshall", "Zulus reports on having seen", statistics such as "Return of Troops in the Field 6 July 1879" and "Statement of Supplies" - including Brandy, Port Wine and Sherry. A number of pages are taken up with copies of letters from Davies and others presumably received by him. Some of the entries are brief, others more detailed: i.e., a Convoy Road Report which runs to five closely written pages. We note book's front cover, which has been bent back and cracked, Davies has written "Should have been written with greater care". Researchers and historians will no doubt agree that the material in this journal and ledger provides a unique if not unparalleled perspective regarding the day-to-day doings of this British battle regiment at a pivotal junction in British colonial history in Africa. BIO NOTES: One online source: Lieutenant-General Henry Fanshawe Davies of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire was born in 1837. Appointed Midshipman in the Royal Navy in 1852 he served with the Navy in the Burma War and in the Baltic. The family had a long history of association with the Grenadier Guards and with the death of his brother Lieutenant F.B. Davies in the trenches before Sebastopol, H.F. Davies resigned his Naval Commission and continued with the family tradition by taking a Lieutenancy in the Grenadier Guards in 1854. Promoted Captain in 1857, he was advanced Colonel in 1870 and sailed for the Cape, for service in the Zulu War, in March 1879. Davies commanded the drafts of the 24th Foot, on board the Troop Transport Clyde; which sank after running onto the reefs off Dyers Island and was in charge of all the troops at the wreck, ensuring their eventual safety. Having arrived in South Africa he joined Major-General Newdigate's Staff and was appointed Officer Commanding of an advanced depot at Conference Hill, May 1879 and was appointed Officer Commanding of Fort Newdigate, the advanced post for the assault on Ulundi (M.I.D. London Gazette 7.5.1879). He commanded the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, 1880-85; Major-General Commanding Cork District, 1889; Lieutenant-General 1893; retired 1898 and was made Honorary Colonel of the Lincolns, 1908. He is buried at Elmley Castle, near Evesham. Approximately 16 South Africa 1877-79 medals, all with '1879' clasp awards were issued to the Grenadier Guards. Davies was the Senior Officer present during the campaign." Overall G. 
Price: 6585.99 USD
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15 WILLIAM H. HENRY 1882 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL OF AN EAGER LAW STUDENT AT CHADDOCK COLLEGE
QUINCY ILLINOIS IL 1882 Fair+ 
On offer is an original 1882 handwritten manuscript journal written by a law student at the Chaddock College in Quincy Illinois. The book begins: "Wm. H. Henry's Book Chaddock College, Jan. 11th, 1882. Record of cases give to the "Commercial Law Class" by "Chief Justice Long" and the decisions thereof during the winter term at "Chaddock College." "Will, Ever remember the fun we had in this class and how earnestly we argued. Research suggest this young man becomes a well known Indiana lawyer and member of the Socialist Party of America. Here are some snippets: 1st day, "left mine at home." You Old Man, Ray." A total of thirty-four handwritten pages having to do with the cases regarding; Canal boat damage, custody for a child, medical college donation, flour mill vs. Sheppard & Hopkings Co., broken marriage promise, promissory notes, undertakers case, Net Exchange Bank vs. William Reinhart, stolen horse and carriage, and other contracts. "Chaddock College Law Department, Quincy Ill, 1-14-82 Case 2 The plaintiff who was a merchant doing business in Quincy Ill. On the first day of May 1878 furnished clothing for the defender's child to the amount of $100. It appeared upon the trial that the defendant and his wife had lived unhappy together and that the wife had finely separated from him for good cause on account of ill-treatment. There had been a contest for the custody of their only child, age 10 years which had been awarded by the Supreme Court to the mother. The child continued to live with the mother against the father's will and he was ready to support it at his own house. She had no separate property sufficient for her own and child's support….." "Mock Court Law School Chaddock College Quincy Ill. 1882 Case 6 Miss A. sues B. for breach of promise of marriage alleging that mutual promise to marry on request was made between them on Jan. 1, 1877 and that she had on the 1 day of July 1878 requested the defendant to marry who had refused to do so. To this action B. makes two defenses. First that when the promise was made Miss. A. was under an engagement to marry another person, C. and that the fact of this prior engagement was not communicated to him. Second that when the engagement to the plaintiff was made, B., was in good health but that on the first day of June 1878 he became seriously ill and has so continued up to the time of this action and that on the first day of July last his health did not admit of his _________into the marriage contract with safety to himself and ………" After the cases are pages heading "Thomas W. Henry's Sale Book" There are quite a few names listed here and and research suggest most of them are from the Quincy area. Some of those last names are; Cassidy, Lawrance, Myers, Atkins, Dunlap, Jolley, Breeden, Caldwell, Walker, Reed, West, Brandon, Seaman, Moberly, and more. The journal has a marbled cover but it's not in good condition. The binding is also loose and it looks like there has been slight water damage. It measures about 7 ½" x 9 ½". F+. 
Price: 1295.99 USD
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16 HENRY PERKINS GODDARD 1885 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY THE 1ST PRESIDENT OF THE SHAKESPEARE CLUB OF BALTIMORE ON ONE OF THE MORE ECCENTRIC VISITORS TO HIS HOME
BALTIMORE MARYLAND MD 1885 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a fascinating, original manuscript 1885 letter handwritten by Henry Perkins Goddard (1842-1916) an American newsman, author and Civil War Capt. of 14th CT Infantry. He was also 1st president of the Shakespeare Club of Baltimore and on familiar terms with many notable authors of the day including Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. The 4 page autograph letter signed ink appears to read, Harry dated May 13, [18]85, Balt., to Joe makes for an interesting peek into the arts. Here is a snippet: "Joaquin Miller - the poet, was my guest during the A.G.P. reunion - several other folks disappointing us at the last minute - and the ladies found him very interesting, though Mrs. Goddard puts it well when she said 'For 24 hours he was delightful. More of him would have been tedious.' He is you know eccentric." The letter also mentions seating Miller next to Judge Phelps at dinner; Secy Boyd; making trip to New York and more. Light soiling, overall VG. 
Price: 855.99 USD
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17 HADDON, HENRY J., RN SURGEON 1887 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF A ROYAL NAVAL SURGEON'S TIME WITH THE BRITISH FLEET IN THE AUSTRALASIAN TERRITORIES
AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND AUSTRALASIAN SOUTH SEAS 1887 Fair Manuscript 
On offer is a super, historical manuscript diary of British Naval Marine significance handwritten by a surgeon of the Royal Navy during his stint in the Australasian territories. Henry J. Haddon (1861-1929), a surgeon in the Royal Navy writes in a 2 x 3.25 inch flip book style diary of approx. 90 pp of notes and details of his time at the Australasian Station before his marriage [we list separately his later correspondence with his wife and his service closer to home] beginning November 15th 1887 leaving Sydney on the S.S. Cintra to join the HMS 'Rapid'. He writes until November 1888. [His notes, at times, read like a real life 'Doctor Stephen Maturin' of famed Patrick O'Brian's super British naval series of novels after 'Master and Commander'! In fact there are some very enigmatic entries written in perhaps Greek or Latin for some unknown reason.] Bio notes: Haddon qualified in Dublin and joined the Navy in 1885, retiring in 1906. He came out of retirement at the beginning of WWI. The diary proper has some loose pages but all seem accounted for. The back cover is absent. Overall Fair. 
Price: 5255.99 USD
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18 HENRY S. DeFOREST 1888 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY THE NOTED PRESIDENT OF TALLADEGA COLLEGE AND THE FATHER OF THE FATHER OF RADIO
TALLADEGA, ALABAMA 1888 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is an original, interesting manuscript letter handwritten by H. S. DeForest, noted president of Talladega College in Talladega Alabama, Alabama's oldest private historically black college. The two page letter dated Jan. 5, 1888 on letterhead is addressed to Rowland Mather of Hartford, [he of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions we believe] with some significant school related content. Here are some snippets: "We are very full, and never before have had as many day or boarding pupils. Last year we enlarged the School House, where our lower grades are taught, putting in also a good room for the sewing department." "Aid granted to students who work and earn it, does not lessen self-reliance, or dev[e]lop the 'big-head.'" With small obit affixed lower back page. Creases, stains, else G+. 
Price: 1355.99 USD
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19 [HENRY MORTON STANLEY] 1890s ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT NOTES ON A LECTURE BY THE RENOWNED AFRICAN EXPLORER DETAILING THE EMIN PASHA RELIEF EXPEDITION
England 1890 Very Good 
On offer is a superb manuscript relic of Victorian Era exploration, travel and adventure being an original notebook handwritten by what appears to be a reporter's notes [there are editorial corrections in colored pencil] from a lecture given by Henry Morton Stanley concerning the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition and a journey into Darkest Africa. This notebook has 12 pages of handwritten notes written on one side of the page only plus the covers and one blank page at the end measuring about 9.5" x 6". The notes begin: "As Stanley entered the stage and walked to his seat he was greeted with loud applause which lasted for about one minute, then he was introduced and there was more applause, after the audience became quiet he began to speak. He began by saying my lecture tonight will be upon the preparations for the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition and of our march through Darkest Africa. The he went on and gave his impression of Emin Pasha, a very large broad shouldered military hero - a second Chinese Gordon...." It is known that following the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition into Darkest Africa Stanley went on a lecture tour in advance of publishing his book and this appears to be most assuredly the notes from one of those lectures. The handwriting is neat and legible and easily read. Overall VG. The following is some information on Henry Morton Stanley and the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition from Wikipedia: The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition of 1886 to 1889 was one of the last major European expeditions into the interior of Africa in the nineteenth century, ostensibly to the relief of Emin Pasha, General Charles Gordon's besieged governor of Equatoria, threatened by Mahdist forces. Led by Henry Morton Stanley, the expedition came to be both celebrated, for its ambition in crossing "darkest Africa", and notorious, for the bloodshed and death left in its wake. When the Mahdists captured Khartoum in 1885, Egyptian administration of the Sudan collapsed, and the extreme southern province Equatoria, located on the upper reaches of the Nile near Lake Albert was nearly cut off from the outside world. Emin Pasha was a German doctor and naturalist who had been appointed Governor of Equatoria. He was able to send and receive letters via Buganda and Zanzibar and had been informed in February 1886 that the Egyptian government would abandon Equatoria. In July, encouraged by the missionary Alexander Mackay, he had invited the British government to annex Equatoria itself. Although the government was not interested in such a doubtful venture, the British public came to see Emin as a second General Gordon in mortal danger from the Mahdists. By November, Scottish businessman and philanthropist William Mackinnon, who had been involved in various colonial ventures, had approached Stanley about leading a relief expedition. Stanley declared himself ready "at a moment's notice" to go. Mackinnon then approached J. F. Hutton, a business acquaintance also involved in colonial activities, and together they organized the "Emin Pasha Relief Committee", mostly consisting of Mackinnon's friends, whose first meeting was on 19 December 1886. The Committee raised a total of about 32,000 pounds. Stanley was officially still in the employment of Léopold II of Belgium, whom he had been employed by in carving out Léopold's 'Congo Free State'. As a compromise for letting Stanley go, it was arranged in a meeting in Brussels between Stanley and the king, that the expedition would take a longer route up the Congo River, contrary to plans for a shorter route inland from the eastern African coast. In return, Léopold would provide his Free State steamers for the transportation of the expedition up the river, from Stanley Pool (now Pool Malebo) as far as the mouth of the Aruwimi River. By 1 January 1887 Stanley was back in London preparing the expedition, to widespread public acclaim." 
Price: 1295.99 USD
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20 HENRY A. WHITEHEAD 1892 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT WORLD TRAVEL DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A 'TYPICAL' VICTORIAN GENTLEMAN
Shustoke Warwickshire England 1892 Hard Cover Good+ Autograph
On offer is a super original 19th Century manuscript travel diary in a premium leather bound notebook of about 200 pages of lined paper. Signed and dated 1892 by Henry A. Whitehead on the first page. [Research suggests Whitehead was vicar of the village in the mid nineteenth century.] The journey starts from Shustoke in Warwickshire, via Birmingham to Liverpool, where the author with his companion McWilliams boards his first boat The Mareotis, at Huskisson Dock, bound for Gibraltar, Tangiers, Algeria, Malta, Alexandria, Ramleh, Cairo, Aden, Zanzibar, Mozambique, Durban and beyond. This is a very languid look at the life and experiences of a leisured Victorian tourist in North Africa who receives invitations to Governor's parties, meets and calls on Colonels and Majors with important jobs, who knows the HMS Thunderer and HMS Camperdown when he sees them in harbour, visiting the 'Armoury', mentions making many sketches, interesting commentary regarding other passenger particulary the German officers after Cairo, interesting copy of a King Neptune broadside, a guest of the Consul, time spent with Churchill and much, much more. Whitehead arrived back in England in September, the last few months of the diary being devoted to his daily home life. Only the last six pages of the notebook are unused. Covers rubbed at edges. Spine splitting. Internally fine. These daily entries vary in length from just a few lines to several pages and run from January 29th to 31st December of the same year. Overall G+. 
Price: 1785.99 USD
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