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1 JOHN GAILBREATH 1763 ORIGINAL COLONIAL AMERICA MANUSCRIPT LANDLORD TENANT AGREEMENT WITH SURPRISING TERMS OF TENANCY
PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA COUNTY OF CHESTER 1763 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a superb, original 1763 manuscript relic of Colonial America being a handwritten legal agreement between a shopkeeper and millwright to his future tenant. Historians and collectors of legal Americana will appreciate the wonderful content: the tenant could only keep two fires in the house; in the kitchen and the other room and among other things he had to agree to take in the landlord's wife or mother! Here is a some of the transcription: "Memorandum the____ day of May 1763 made between John Gailbreath of the City of Philadel shopkeeper of the one part and Richard Hall of Springfield in the county of Chester Millwright of the other part as follows. First the----John Gailbreath herby letts his house and plantation in Springfield for one year from the date hereof to the said Richard Hall paying the rent of twenty seven pounds and if the rent is not paid at the years end to give security to pay the same in four months after which the tenant agrees to do and keep the house, fences, and premises in repair as good as now. And that he shall not keep more fires in the house but only one in the kitchen and one in the other room. And also not to cut any timber or wood but in the back field joining to Crosiers Plantation and that for fencing and fireing on the premises and the use the tops of the trees and old decayed wood for fireing first and that he shall not plough nor sow but only the back fields or the field next the meadow for winter corn. But he may put summer grain anywhere were it has been usual. If the tenant thinks fit he may plant indian corn in the fallow field. The tenant agrees if Mrs. Gailbreath shall have a mind to go live on the places she may have the back room below stairs and if the landlord shall have a mind to put another tenant on the place next season he may send persons by the first day of next april who shall have liberty to work on the place and have use of the house in the spring with as little unconveniency to the tenant as can reasonably be expected. And the tenant agrees not to take any hay, straw, or dung off the premises and the tenant is to have liberty to reap his corn and thrash it in the barn after the time is out leaving the straw and the chaff and the tenant agrees to deliver up the quiet and peaceable ----of the premises unto the landlord on the first day of may next and for the true performance of all and singular the covenants agreement afor. The said parties to these presents do hereby bind themselves their executors and administrators each other in the penal sum of fifty pounds lawful money firmly by these presents in witness." Has some edge staining and small tears but overall G. 
Price: 1185.99 USD
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2 R. Brookes and Johannes (John) Prince 1776 RARE AMERICANA - THE GENERAL GAZETTEER OR COMPENDIOUS GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY WITH HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LOG OF THE REVOLUTIONARY PRIVATEER 'THE PILGRIM' INCLUDING THE SPOILS OF WAR
Dublin 1776 Full-Leather Very Good 
Superb find of early Americana on offer: HANDWRITTEN DIARY NOTES ON THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND THE BOOK "THE GENERAL GAZETEER OR, COMPENDIOUS GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY" by R. Brookes. Dublin: Printed for J.Williams, 1776.Unpaginated. Original full leather binding with raised spine. This 230 year old book is tight and clean and in a fine state of preservation. This very scarce early book belonged to a sailor aboard the ship Pilgrim who kept a rare hand written account of one of the most successful privateers in the American Revolution. The diary starts July, 1779; "JOHANNES PRINCE Eyus Liber July the 9, 1779." John Prince, of Beverly, Massachusetts, likely an officer aboard the Pilgrim, who, research indicates became a Reverend at the First Church in Salem after the war. It is interesting to note that Prince, as one of the crew of the Pilgrim, was instrumental in founding the Philosophical Library that was the foundation for the Salem Atheneum. The Philosophical Library was founded in 1781 from the spoils of war. The Pilgrim captured the DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, the first of her nine valuable prizes, on September 5 in the Irish Channel. The ship was carrying the library belonging to Richard Kirwin (1733-1812). Kirwin's library was transferred to the Pilgrim and subsequently auctioned off in Salem. The library was purchased by Reverend Joseph Willard of the first Church in Beverly. Eventually the volumes were given to John Prince at the First Church in Salem and later became the beginning of the Salem Atheneum. Prince dates his writings with an inscription "1779" and the narrative covers the inside cover and endpaper of the book proper. Beginning at the top of the inside front cover "Pilgrim sailed April the 13 1779." The Pilgrim has been described as "one of the most famous of the privateers during the American Revolution was the PILGRIM sailing out of Beverly, Massachusetts. This ship-rigged vessel of 200 tons achieved results comparable to those of the LIVERPOOL PACKET, being credited with taking fifty British prizes..."(Howe 1922; 349, 352). This diary appears to cover only the year 1779 listing the prizes taken, and their respective sizes (how many guns and men, etc.) and also a very brief description of the battle (how many killed, how many taken prisoner). Most of this log is legible, however, there are several words that could not be made out. There is more writing on the back side of the endpaper. It starts "THE PIRATE RUNNER SCHOONER PHILANTHROPIST JOHN PRINCE COMMANDER IN PILLOW." Underneath reads "Wrote I expect by Mr. John Crop - mate 1795." A description of what appears to a Paris hospital is also penned. Rear endpapers have writings and notes of a financial nature. 
Price: 8749.99 USD
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3 JOHN McDUFFEE 1784 ORIGINAL POST REVOLUTIONARY COMPLEX MATHEMATICS AND CYPHER BOOK HANDWRITTEN BY NOTED CITIZEN OF ROCHESTER NEW HAMPSHIRE
ROCHESTER NEW HAMPSHIRE NH 1784 Fair+ Manuscript 
On offer is an original 1784 manuscript cypher and mathematics book handwritten by John McDuffee of Rochester Vermont. There are 52 pages of arithmetic and mathematical tables, equations and principles: compound multiplication, compound division, reduction for farthings, shillings, etc., calculation the minutes since the birth of the Savior to 1784, tons of wine, hogsheads of wine, The Golden Rule, provisions, measurements, interest, Rules of Practice, gallons of rum, table of money weights and measures, some business principles +++. Measuring 7.25 x 11.75", it is bound in together without covers; the first and last leaf a bit more darkened as a result of wear. Remaining all bound, the leaves are very clear and easily read with minimal edgewear and rounding for their age and use. McDuffee has written his name and place of residence in many places with dates starting at 1784 and some references to 1801 such as someone owing him money etc. BIO NOTES: His stepfather was Lt Col. John McDuffe, son of an Irish immigrant that fought valiantly in both the French and Indian War and the Revolution and was a Congressman. John Jr, whose real father was Capt Daniel McDuffee, was adopted by Lt Col John Sr. McDuffee went on, only a few years after his schooling and the creation of this cypher book, to become a successful farmer and important part of Rochester's history, as noted below, so this gives added charm to this fantastic post Revolutionary War cypher book. Overall Fair+. 
Price: 2485.99 USD
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4 JOHN LANG 1800s ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF HANDWRITTEN MUSIC ARRANGEMENTS OF NUMEROUS CLASSICAL PIECES AND HIS OWN ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS
England 1850 Fair+ Manuscript 
On offer is a remarkable, extensive 19th Century manuscript archive of handwritten music collected, written and compiled by British composer John Lang renowned for his composition "Joy and Peace". Some later items in the group were likely added by his son James and daughter Emily. There are hundreds [the pile is about 3 inches thick] of handwritten and printed pages of classical music with most of the pages are arrangments done by Lang of classical pieces by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven among others. There are many pages of Beethoven's Egmont and a handwritten arrangement of Don Juan. There are a few original compositions of John Lang and I noticed a short signed piece by Arthur David Freedman a composer from Minnesota, which is from 1921 [much newer than the rest]. The majority of this work was done in the early 1800s; there are a couple from the 1870s and the 1921 work of Freedman. The condition varies, there is foxing, chipping and some staining and there could be a few missing pages. Overall better than Fair. 
Price: 3255.99 USD
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5 JOHN JENKINS to COL. JOHN JENKINS 1802 ORIGINAL SIGNIFICANT MANUSCRIPT RELIC OF EARLY PENNSYLVANIA POLITICS AND POLITICKING IN WASHINGTON CITY BY ONE JOHN JENKINS TO HIS RENOWNED RELATIVE COLONEL JOHN JENKINS BACK HOME IN LUZERNE COUNTY
LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, WYOMING COUNTY 1802 Good- Manuscript 
On offer is a significant, original manuscript relic of Pennsylvania state history dated City of Washington January 20 1802 a mere 27 or so years after the first and second Continental Congresses in 1774 and 1775 and 15 years after Statehood. Handwritten by John Jenkins to the renowned Colonel John Jenkins [b.1751], the author's father or brother most likely]. The letter reads in part "…letter from new York restating our position and had to attend on business….Eleventh day here…our petition are not yet presented to Congress… Judge Baron? from Starkbridge…I have given out a number of our coppays of our petition [likely regarding the Compromise Act of 1799] to the members of Congress so as to give them a fair understanding of the subject one of the members from Pennsylvania informed me in conversation that they (that is) the members from Pennsylvania, would oppose the petition as it would destroy the Scranton ___." On the reverse side it is stamped with "WASH'N CITY" and "JAN 3" along with "PAID" addressed to Col. John Jenkins, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Another Jenkins name, in addition to John is written at the bottom of the page, left, B. ___Jenkins. [Local historians and researchers will no doubt have little problem sorting out the authorship and relationship of the three Jenkins' who are named.] HISTORICAL NOTES: from the book WILD YANKEES: Compromise of 1799 "In the spring of 1799, Pennsylvania made the first in a series of moves that would ultimately resolve land disputes in an around the Wyoming Valley. On April 4, the state assembly passed the Compromise Act, which allowed settlers that held Connecticut deeds that predate the Trenton Decree to obtain Pennsylvania titles to their lands. The legislation established a three-man-commission empowered to assess the legitimacy of settlers' claims, survey their tracts, and ascertain their value. Settlers who had their Connecticut deeds confirmed by the commissioners had to pay, depending on the value of their farms, between eight cents to two dollars per acre in eight annual instalments. The proceeds from these sales went toward defraying the cost of compensating Pennsylvania claimants who lost property to Connecticut settlers. As with the Confirming Act of 1787, the new law encouraged Connecticut claimants holding deeds issued before 1783 to move toward reconciliation with the state and to turn their backs of settlers who held titles issued after the Trenton Decree. After some initial hesitation, the lure of secure titles at low prices assured the act's acceptance among Yankee settlers in the fifteen Susquehannah Company towns established before the Trenton Decree. These settlements covered the Wyoming Valley and adjacent lands…." BIO NOTES: From one online source: "Col. John Jenkins was the son of John Jenkins, a magistrate and surveyor. Responsive to the first whisper of independence, the people of the valley assembled in town meeting to proclaim their hearty approval of the movement. The presiding officer at that meeting was Col. Jenkins; he was moderator, and in common with the other patriots assembled, devoted their lives and their sacred honor to the great cause of their fellow-man. Of that meeting and its resolves in behalf of liberty, Hon. Charles Miner has well said: "I would rather have those patriotic votes to show, as the work of an ancestor of mine, than the proudest patent of nobility ever granted by a king." Col. John Jenkins was appointed tax collector, but was enrolled for military duty and was actively employed from first to last. He served the people with ability and fidelity in the Connecticut general assembly, when this was Westmoreland county. His neat and accurate records of surveys from Wilkes-Barre extending a considerable distance into New York, are the never-failing authority of civil engineers to this day. He was a democrat and nearly worshiped his ideal, Thomas Jefferson, while his friend and much a close companion in all those times that tried men's souls, Col. John Franklin, was an enthusiastic federalist. Here their political lines parted, but on the great question of liberty and human rights they were as the steel and magnet. Of his capture while on a scouting expedition near Wyalusing, has been told on a preceding page. After a long and cruel captivity he returned and was the first to bring positive information of the invasion. The joy of the people at his safe return was turned to sudden gloom by the cloud then seen to be gathering in the north. He had been only recently married when captured. Mrs. Bertha Jenkins lived to the age of eighty-four years; died in 1841." [History of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania H. C. Bradsby, Editor S. B. Nelson & Co., Publishers, 1893.] The 13¼" by 8" letter is missing a 1¾ by 1¼ inch square at the bottom, middle section and has another ½" square almost halfway down, center. Large section directly above the larger square is vulnerable to coming out in an "l" shape of 2½ by 1½". Several tears, small holes along 2nd from bottom fold line, largely on fold line. The outside edges are chipped and a dog ear. Yellowing, foxing and some grime as well as the occasional random spot or speck/stray mark. Overall G-. 
Price: 4455.99 USD
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6 JOHN JOSEPH COIRON 1812 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LETTER BY GEORGIA SUGAR PLANTATION OWNER MOVING TO LOUISIANA TO HIS FAMED BUSINESS PARTNER SAMUEL COATES OF PHILADELPHIA
NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA LA PHILADELPHIA PA 1812 Manuscript Good Autograph
On offer is a super, original handwritten manuscript autograph latter signed [ALS] and dated January 21, 1812 New Orleans Louisiana by a Georgia sugar plantation owner John Joseph Coiron to his friend and associate Samuel Coates in Philadelphia. Research finds that Mr. Coiron was a noted businessman, slave-owner and entrepreneur whose portrait hangs in the Louisiana State Museum. His wife, Zelime Gautier is buried in New Orleans. Mr. Coates is also famous in his own right having been very prominent in Philadelphia. The letter mentions the plantation owner's 30 day journey from Savannah with his entire family through Creek Indian territory to New Orleans, the costs of his newly purchased plantation, the city of Washington, etc. This is one sheet written of both sides. G+. 
Price: 1285.99 USD
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7 JOHN WHEELER, INSTRUCTOR 1820 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT SCHOOL ACCOUNTING DETAILING TUITIONS PAID
AMENIA, NEW YORK Dutchess County 1820 Manuscript Fair+ Autograph
An original handwritten ledger sheet which appears to be a school bill for District 19 in 1820. The school bill is for nine different pupils. There is a cut out of the amount for one student. The school bill is 7 3/4"x 7 1/2" Has been folded. 
Price: 225.99 USD
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8 JOHN STANWOOD PULSIFER 1820s ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LEDGER BOOK FILLED WITH RELIGIOUS, PERSONAL, FINANCIAL AND GENEALOGICAL ENTRIES IN A MASSIVE FOLIO
CATSKILLS NEW YORK, ORWIGSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 1820 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a fascinating, massive ledger book dated Catskills New York 1820 that contained the original, handwritten writings of John S[tanwood] Pulsifer. John was a noted Quaker brother and his writings include early religious writings relative to his studies then later financial transactions, notes etc., plus letter copies of personal letters and many other writings and the odd scribble by some youngster. The beginning of the book is written on Duncan's Logic then daily logs of sermons and discussions among the Presbyterian Church, Records of funds, travels, philosophies, correspondence between several parties as the book seems to have traveled. Some entries are from Massachusetts and some include signatures and/or names of priests, preachers or other clergy. While we do find any ownership signature of Pulsifer he has signed his name at the end of his copy letters. The folio book proper is rusting with age and the spine cap is detached on one side the contents are better than good. Overall G. BIO NOTES: One online source provides: John Stanwood Pulsifer, the eldest of nine children, born September 18, 1798, in Ipswich, who died September 6, 1866, in Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania. John entered Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1817 but remained there only a year. He studied theology and was licensed as a Presbyterian missionary in 1823, then spent the next two years traveling around Albany, Columbia, Rensselaer, and Greene Counties in New York. He spent 1825 to 1832 in Massachusetts, visiting towns near Ipswich and unsuccessfully seeking a pulpit. In 1833, he moved to Morris County, New Jersey, where he taught school in several places, including Dover, German Valley, and Parsippany. In 1837, John moved to Pennsylvania, teaching in Easton and Upper Mount Bethel, then finally settling in Orwigsburg, where he taught school, worked as a surveyor, occasionally preached, and was superintendent of a Sunday school. J. S. Pulsifer was elected a corresponding member of NEHGS in 1859. 
Price: 2355.99 USD
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9 JOHN R. WRIGHT 1830s - 1880 ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF EIGHT [8] MANUSCRIPT DIARIES HANDWRITTEN BY A WESTERN NEW YORK FARMER WITH ONE EYE TO THE SPIRITUALISM MOVEMENT
WESTFIELD, CHATAUQUA COUNTY, NEW YORK 1835 Good Manuscript 
On offer are the original manuscript diaries [8] handwritten by John R. Wright (circa 1830-1880) a farmer and laborer in Westfield, Chatauqua County, New York. Westfield is in the section of western New York State popularly known as the "Burnt Over District," it is also a dozen miles from Lily Dale the birthplace of the modern Spiritualist movement. While the handwriting poses a challenge it appears that the Wrights were one of the many families caught up in the religious fervor sweeping the area. The diary notes attendance on several occasions at Spiritualist meetings. Our diarist, John R. Wright, and his father James, were two of about twenty-five people from Westfield that signed a petition in 1854 for the Spiritualist Newspaper, asking Congress to appoint a "Scientific Commission to investigate certain physical and mental phenomena of questionable origin and mysterious import that have of late occurred in this country and in Europe." While the diaries for the most part deal with the everyday mundanities of rural life, and there is no end to the work, there is the backdrop of the spiritualist movement like a thread through the entries; there are mentions in the late 1860s going to "U.I.L." (this sometimes looks more like "W.O") often. This seems to a meeting place for Spiritualists, mayhaps an experimental circle where séances were held. These mentions seem to peak around 1866 and 1867. "Wednesday, June 14, 1854: Planted potatoes all day. Pa observed for me in the Morn. the ? off & Spiritual meeting"; "Wednesday August 28, 1867: Went over to u.i.e. In the morn & again afternoon. S. M. Livingston said lite & water lives in ?" The main spiritualist appears to be a man named: "J. Dibble" - mentioned often throughout the diaries and also in relation to the U.I.L. (or W.O.) camp. 
Price: 2455.99 USD
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10 JOHN RABY 1830s ORIGINAL 500+ PAGE MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF METHODIST SERMONS, ESSAYS, THEOLOGICAL DISCOURSE AND HANDWRITTEN TESTIMONY OF HAUNTINGS AND APPARITIONS
CLITHEROE, LANCASHIRE ENGLAND BRITAIN 1830 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is a super, significant manuscript book of Methodist Theological essays, sermons and religious reflections handwritten by itinerant Methodist preacher John Raby of Clitheroe in Lancashire. Titled "Theological Essays the Outlines of Sermons and Miscellaneous Observations on Divers Passages of the Scriptures, Volume Second. Begun in Clitheroe By John Raby. Feb.y 7th 1836 And Finished…" [no final date given the almost 550 pages]. The author has created an index of the contents to the rear. Historians and researchers of early 19th Century religious teachings and thought will have a treasure trove but included in this massive effort are two narratives of hauntings and apparitions as revealed to Raby in his wanderings. A third notable handwritten copy of 'The Missionary's Farewell' which was circulating in England from the 1820s in the Evangelical Magazine. The two ghost narratives are nine pages in total. The first is recounted by Raby as coming from 'Mr Peter Mill when on his death bed who commenced his itinerant labours in 1774 and died at Hull April 1806'. The haunting took place in Crowle in Lincolnshire in 1783 and despite Mill's sceptical belief that the apparition 'was possessed of flesh and bones a Mischievous Ghost in a human body', he is changed by a night (vividly described) which he spent in the haunted house: 'once he felt as if a Man's foot come on his foot with considerable pressure. Stubborn facts now drove away all his incredulity, his nerves were shook and his mind exceedingly agitated.' This is followed by the revelation from a woman living near by that the commotion is caused by the spirit of a friend who she summoned to attest to the fact. A second shorter apparition narrative follows, retold from a Methodist preacher on the Bristol circuit, in which the apparition foretells a death. The book is a large 10 x 8 inch book has a black leather spine and tips over marbled board. Typical rubbing but overall G+. 
Price: 2685.99 USD
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11 JOHN WHEELER RUTLEDGE [to Julia Ann Ward Rutledge] 1835 HANDWRITTEN LETTER FROM A DOTING HUSBAND IN BALTIMORE TO HIS WIFE, TOUCHING ON FAMILY, FRIENDS, AND THE GROWTH AND LOVE OF THEIR CHILDREN TOGETHER
BALTIMORE MARYLAND MD CAMPBELL VIRGINA VA 1835 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a letter, written from Baltimore in 1835, by John Wheeler Rutledge, to his loving wife and friend, Julia Ann Rutledge in Virginia. The letter is sweet and obviously shows a deep devotion to his wife. As to why they are apart, it does not say, but it seems that Julia is with her family in Virginia. They’re home seems to be in Baltimore, as John speaks of their children and of his work, most probably as a farmer. The letter touches on a number of subjects, but mostly family, friends, and some gossip. It was written in Baltimore on October 20th, 1834. It begins, “My Dear Julia Ann” and after some words about receiving her last letter, he writes about his “great satisfaction to hear of your safe arrival, and good health, and of Martha Ganes being so much pleased with her board. It also gives me great pleasure, to inform you that my health is much better than it was when you left home.” He believes “the main cause is that preacher is gone...which I now think was a great drain back on my health.” He lets her know that his children are doing well, in good health, and very fond of her and often “asking me question about going to Virginia for you and about Grand Ma, and sister.” He mentions that his son Randolph has “fattened like a little pig” and “become very fond of me.” His son Randolph was born in 1834 and is one year old. He then tells her of their cousin Jane, who is visiting and “seems quite low spirited at times, complains very much of being so lonesome.” John may be a farmer in Baltimore, as he tells Julia that he has got a “lot of corn by the Spring House, pulled, shucked and lofted” and of the “pumpkins gathered.” John says he is “very sorry to hear D. Rutledge’s health is likely to be so delicated, tell John to write me soon and let me know if he has seen a John Lynch” and as well that “he is very sorry to hear that you did not get in soon enough for Martha Dollard’s wedding, as I have no doubt you would have enjoyed yourself very much.” He then informs her that “Abraham Amos’ negro woman Easter and her husband, Wm. Bosley had Runaway last saturday night.” He makes no further comment on this. Finally, he finishes with pleasantries and implores her to “give my love to Mother, and all inquirious friends, tell Martha Jane to behave pretty and be good girl, and believe me to be your affectionate Husband. John W. Rutledge.” The letter is 4 pages in length (one long sheet folded in half and written on both sides). The front cover has the letter address written: Ms. Julia Ann Rutledge, Moormans Campbell, County Virginia It is in a very legible handwriting, black ink, with minimal smudging. The letter shows a good bit of wear from aging and folding, and there is a good deal of discoloration of the paper, but this does not impede any legibility of the handwriting. There are also a few small holes in the paper, but only one hole is in the place of a word, and that word can easily be assumed. This is a lovely document. (Background: John Wheeler Rutledge was born May 7, 1800 in Harford, Maryland and his wife Julia Ann Rutledge (née Ward) was born May 2, 1808 in Campbell, Virginia. They were married September 30, 1826. John died in 1873 and Julia in 1889. They had six children together born between 1828 and 1843.) 
Price: 685.99 USD
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12 JOHN MORRIS 1840 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF COMPLEX EQUATIONS, MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS FOR NAVIGATION, MEASURING DISTANCES, SETTING COURSES AND WORKING OUT LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE ALONG WITH A CHARMING, ENGAGING 15 PAGE MINI-NOVEL
London England 1840 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original 1840s manuscript copybook titled Practical Geometry handwritten by John Morris of London England. The book is comprised of geometry and trigonometry related to navigation and seamanship and contains many case studies for problems in Geometry and Trigonometry, with calculations, tables and illustrated examples, filling every page. Case studies for setting courses, determining longitude and latitude, calculating distances etc., etc. in various methods make for a superb early practical education in British nautical lore. The 140 page book includes a fair copy of an autograph letter written by Morris to his lawyer (later docketed Feb. 25, 1841) and a fair copy of a business recommendation letter requesting that the Duke of Northumberland appoint Morris lighthouse keeper or a lighthouse being erected dated March 13, 1841 concerning procuring a position in the Trinity House. Much, much more than a simple mathematics copybook this is an interesting compilation of nautical studies and later recordings relevant to the life of John Morris. At the rear of the book, 15 pages of an original novel are written in a neat uniform hand. The novel is likely the original work of John Morris and adds an engaging breadth to the personality of the author. The prose is skillful, with intricate details, and accounts for good character development; the writing style referencing the work of romantics. The text is continuous and at the last leaf, ends "Therefore upon your finger pure golden pledge the Bridal Ring." The 12 x 8 inch book is written in brown ink in a neat slanting cursive there are original marbled paper covered boards, with cloth back strip, browning, lightly soiled, two leaves excised at rear; corners bumped but overall G. 
Price: 2855.99 USD
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13 LT. FRANCIS JOHN HEXT, 83rd REGIMENT OF FOOT 1844 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A VERY ABLE 27 YEAR OLD OFFICER IN THE 83rd REGIMENT OF FOOT SOON AFTER THEIR RETURN FROM CANADA
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE ENGLAND 1844 Very Good Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original wonderfully detailed 1844 manuscript diary handwritten by Lieutenant Francis John Hext of the 83rd County of Dublin Regiment of Foot. Francis Hext was native to Bodmin Cornwall. The Regiment having returned from Canada the year before they settled in Northamptonshire. Francis records the daily life of a British officer in the army, parades, drills and marches, with a fair bit of time to be an avid huntsman and fisherman, often recording details of what game he had shot. Here are some snippets: January 2nd 1844 "Attended the Freemasons lodge in the evening and was raised to the rank of fellow craftmason". March 3rd 1844 "At St Mabyn church in the morning and Bodmin in the evening. Miss Molesworth and T.Tickell dined." March 19th 1844 "In the afternoon went to Woods Pottery and had my cast taken in plaster." June 27th 1844 "Very fine day. Sat on a courtmartial for the trial of Color Sgt Farnell. Adjourned at three o'clock". July 2nd 1844 "Fine morning. On duty this day for Hamilton...a new battery of artillery marched in this day from Woolwich." July 3rd 1844 "Capt Flds and Lt Mornetan with their artillery started this morning for Woolwich. Shot a large Pike in the lower Barracks Canal." July 9th 1844 "went with Cayab and Kidnall to Daventry reservoir and killed a few fish. Dived on the back of the pond." July 15th 1844 "Austin drilled the regiment... at 4 O'clock went to the canal, fished and caught some good ones. Walked to Dodford church and Daventry through the fields, and got home again at eleven o'clock. Head shave today." July 17th 1844 "Very fine day. Walked with Austin and De Rigny to Althorp Park. Saw the house and fine paintings. The park magnificent. Dined in a small village." August 18th 1844 "My birthday - 27 years of age....buried Private Rentler, who died of consumption." October 18th 1844 "Bought a gun, priced £23." November 18th 1844 'Five in the morning commence shooting with Kendall and Mr Sawle...and continued all day....killed 33 rabbits, 11 woodcock and several pheasants". There are financials besides the diary entries at the back. The diary measures 4 x 6½ inch and is brown blind stamped cloth. The binding is tight. Overall VG. 
Price: 3655.99 USD
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14 JOHN B. TOULMIN 1846 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTERS [2] HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF ALABAMA'S LEADING COTTON FACTORS AND WHY COTTON WAS INDEED KING IN MOBILE
MOBILE, ALABAMA 1846 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original, significant 1846 autographed pair [2] of manuscript stampless letters dated Mobile Alabama handwritten by John B. Toulmin to Abraham Bell & Son, New York City. The business letters from one of the leading cotton factors in 19th Century Mobile, Alabama exemplify the importance of the cotton trade, shows the international nature of cotton and how a receivable from New York City even in 1846 could affect claims in Mobile a commercial town filled lawyers, factors, merchants and professionals serving the cotton trade's needs. Mobile in the 1840s was the second busiest cotton port after New Orleans. It was also an important slave trade center. The primary letter from Toulmin to Bell & Son and the second is a copy of another letter involving the same topic between two lawyers. Written in haste, a bit of a challenge; here are snippets: "By Mail P. Paid Mobile Decm 1: 1846 Messrs A. Bell & Son 12/8 Dear Sirs [There is a quick introductory statement about a sight draft and 200 bales of cotton] Toulmin then says "There is again no Eastern Mail..." [A specific mail carried east by steamship?] He mentions a "copy of a letter to Hiram Barney Esq. New - York." [Another letter has been appended to this one] "It explains itself. For the benefit of my Estate I wish to Purchase the claim on Austill [Jeremiah Austill (1794-1881) was an Alabama folk hero who as a 19 year participated in the Canoe Fight with the Creeks in 1813 and was the night courier between the forts in the Creek Country. He later was a merchant, planter, county clerk and state Representative and Senator.] if it be had for a trifle [like many ante-bellum Americans Toulmin is trying to make money by buying debt] If Robert Hamilton controls the claim [likely a merchant in NYC] perhaps you can ascertain and inform me where he is to be found. I learn that he is in [?] but cannot tell where. He was formerly of New York [?] I am Dear sirs Resp lly yours J.B. Toulmin". The second letter is on the next page and listed as "Copy" "Mobile Nov 25, 1846 Hiram Barney Esq. [Hiram Barney (1811-1895) was born in Henderson, New York and graduated from Union College in 1834. He was an active lawyer in New York City for many years and an abolitionist leader. He ran for Congress on the Anti-Slavery ticket in 1840 and was a Presidential Elector for the Free Soil Party in 1848 and was a delegate to the Republican National conventions in 1856 and 1860. Barney met privately with Abraham Lincoln in Springfield after the nomination representing New York interests in Cabinet appointments. ] I presume upon the acquaintance that has arisen through our brief correspondence, [both are lawyers] to ask a professional favor. If it result in ascertaining that nothing can be done, it will give you very little trouble. If it [?] to useful results we can secure you a reasonable fee. Hamilton & Cole, [not identified] of your city, took the benefit of the general bankrupt law in New York. Jeremiah Austill, [see above] of our city owed them a large sum, I think $8000.00 or more, ------ But Messrs Hamilton & Cole previous to the assignment by the bank [?] had made an assignment, (in New York) to one Robert Hamilton, in trust for their creditors [Robert Hamilton, not known if related to Hamilton & Cole, has bought debts owed to H & C for less than face value hoping to get more monies when paid by creditors] Whether Austill's debt was then assigned, is not certain. Now will you ascertain 1.Was Austill's debt contained in the schedule in bankruptcy? -- Is it was, 2. Was it sold at the assignors sale, and who was the purchaser? If it was sold, then we wish to buy up the claim, provided it can be obtained for a small sum. [Nobody wants to pay much for the debt] It is in the way of another claim here. [Key point-- Austill's debt to H & C is blocking another claim in Mobile so people in Mobile want to get it.] If the purchaser can be found, and an offer be made here in such a [?] as not to excite in him [?] expectations such orders shall be forwarded, as shall enable you to process the assignment, and satisfy you for the trouble you may have occasion to take. I remain, Sir, very truly Yours J F Adams. [John F. Adams was a Mobile attorney]. BIO NOTES: 1. The author John Butler Toulmin (1788-1860) was an English immigrant who followed his two older brothers to America. [Harry Toulmin (1766-1823) became the 2nd Kentucky Secretary of State and later 2nd Superior Court Judge for the Tombigbee District in Mississippi, 1804-1819.] [Mathew C. Toulmin (1776-1818) died in Mobile.] John B. Toulmin suffered a number of financial reverses before succeeding as a Commission Merchant. He traveled to Britain at least 30 times and in fact died in England. [Note Bell and Toulmin maintained close relations with their home country which benefited both who dealt in an international commodity]. 2. The addressee A. Bell & Son was a company formed in 1844. Abraham Bell (1778-1856) was an Irish Quaker who immigrated to the United States c.1804 and built a large shipping and commission merchant business in New York City focusing on cotton. He maintained close ties with traders in Belfast, Dublin, Liverpool and London and was active in carrying Irish immigrants in the 1840s escaping the ravages of the potato famine. Bell business paper archives are at several repositories including SUNY-Albany; University of Michigan; Winterthur in Delaware and the New York Historical Society. Overall G+. 
Price: 1485.99 USD
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15 JOHN GOULD 1849 - 1855 MASSIVE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY AND JOURNAL DETAILING THE LIFE AND TIMES OF A LOCKPORT NEW YORK MAN WHO WOULD SOON BE ELECTED TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE OF NEW YORK
LOCKPORT NEW YORK NIAGARA COUNTY 1849 Fair Manuscript 
On offer is a super, original 1849 - 1855 historic manuscript relic of Western New York being a handwritten journal and diary of John Gould who was a member of the New York Legislature in 1856. Hand dated September 16, 1849 to June 10, 1855, hand numbered 455 pages makes for a very full, very detailed treasure trove of history for the Lockport, Niagara County area of New York State. Gould's family were deeply ensconced in the Lockport economy: farming wheat and barley, lumbering, horses and all manner of other trading throughout the area. Trade, economics, commerce, genealogy, religion, politics and local events are all detailed by a copious recorder of family daily doings and history. Gould also came back to the book using the free endpapers to leave notes on the death of his father, mother, building a new house on property bought in 1862, his son's? Charles Gould service volunteering (two years) 29 August 1862 during the Civil War with the 44 Elsworth Regiment New York. The approximately 6 3/4" x 8 1/4" once gorgeous book is absolutely full, handwritten in ink and features marbled endpapers, raised bands, original full leather with ornate trim. The exterior leather is quite worn, spine leather well chipped and separated at the back cover. The spine backing is cracked. Overall fair. 
Price: 2155.99 USD
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16 for JOHN MYERS 1849 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT STATEMENT OF MR. MYERS DETAILING THE MOOD OF THE PEOPLE AND THE STATE OF THE ECONOMY AND POLITICS BY A BUSY TAVERN OWNER, LAND HOLDER AND MASON FROM GEORGETOWN IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
FREDERICK COUNTY 1849 Fair Manuscript 
On offer is a fascinating pre Civil War era handwritten statement given by a Mr. Myers, likely John Myers, of the Georgetown section of the District of Columbia. He was a tavern owner, land owner and Mason from Georgetown. Economic and political conditions are discussed in the statement. The two page, on one leaf, 54 line, 1849 testament begins: "Mr. Myers was here and gave his statement. Geo. Town seems to be more depressed than ever all accts from there state it to be extremely dull…" The unknown writer goes on to note from Myers oral statement that the Tavern now rents for $250…$50 less than last year…work continues on the Canal…mentions the issue of South Carolina, Calhoun and Nullification, one of several volatile political issues of the mid 1830s Jacksonian period. The question of State Banks is also mentioned in this document. Geographical locals mentioned include Georgetown, Harpers Ferry, Point of Rocks (a point where a bridge over the Potomac River connects Maryland and Virginia.) and Williamsport. The conflict between canals and railroads is mentioned. Chips, tears some stains and ink smudge but legible and complete and overall Fair. 
Price: 1455.99 USD
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17 JOHN [AND CHARLES] BYERS 1850s-1870s ARCHIVE OF NOTEBOOKS AND JOURNALS DETAILING THE ACCOMPLISHED AND SCIENTIFIC LIFE OF NOTED CIVIL ENGINEER, GEOGRAPHER AND CANAL BUILDER IN THE MID-19TH CENTURY SOUTH
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINA WV, WARMINSTER VIRGINIA 1855 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a large and exhaustive archive of of materials (diaries, journals, field notebooks, etc.) relating to the career and workings of John A. Byers, noted Civil Engineer known for his groundbreaking work on internal improvements in 1850s Virginia. Byers was born in 1806 in Lewes, Delaware, and died in 1872. He was for many years Chief Engineer of the Western Division of the James River and Kanawha Canal Company in Charleston, West Virginia. He was also engaged as civil engineer on the North Branch of the Susquehanna River, and was one of the constructors of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. He would eventually become Chief Engineer and Superintendent of the entire company. His brother Joseph Byers, also a noted civil engineer, was Assistant Engineer, 1836-1840, on the James River at Warminster, Virginia, and Superintendent of the work on that section. The two brothers were engaged as early as 1826 in the most important inland navigation works in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. The last work of importance performed by John A. Byers was the surveys of the James River and Kanawha Canal. The books which contained his surveys of this improvement were so accurate that they were purchased after his death by the U. S. Government from his widow for the continuation of the work. Joseph Byers continued as civil engineers and gained considerable repute in their field, Charles Byers, son of Joseph, was for many years the Chief Engineer of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, John M. Byers was instrumental in constructing the Pennsylvania Railroad, Joseph Byers (son) was engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad and later in charge of the coastal defenses of Brazil. The contents of the archive are as follows: 1. Manuscript Diary headed: “Book of Measurements, notes and measurements of work and facts connected with the North River Impt. Beginning January 1, 1856.” The first entry is in February 4 and continues till March 21st. Some of the entries are just text, but most of the entries contain some sort of calculation or table detailing “Levels on River side,” “width of the bottom of the river,” “height bank” and others. After the entries there are four pages of recipes for gun cotton, photographic emulsion formulas, silver balls for plain paper, and others.The book is bound in cloth backed boards. The binding is slightly worn and a portion of spine is missing. There is some damp-staining. The text is inscribed in both pencil and ink, in generally good legible condition, however some of the penciled pages are light. The book is 36 pages long. The entries run from February 18th-March 18, 1856. It contains brief description of work done, problems encountered plus measurements and survey notes for various, locks, dams, etc., along the line of the canal. He notes the progress on the line of the James River & Kanawha Canal, attendance in court at Lexington as witness in a lawsuit against the canal company brought by a man whose land the canal traversed, efforts to reach a settlement, and much more. He also notes difficulties brought on by the weather, heavy snow and ice on the western side of the Blue Ridge, etc. 2. Manuscript Notebook, inscribed on front free endpaper, “Notes of Work. N. R. Nav. Impt. 1856. J. A. Byers.” The book contains extensive measurements and survey notes and occasional topographical sketches. The text is in pencil, bound in original cloth backed board. The binding is fairly worn. The text is very clean and legible. The book also contains the signatures of Johnston and Tyler Shoul, Kanawha County, Virginia, most probably employees of the company. There is a pencil folk art sketch of a steamboat and man at the end of the volume presumably executed by one of these gentlemen. The book is octavo format, 178 pp. 3. A Manuscript Notebook containing extensive survey and field notes, The first page bears the signature of “Joseph Byers, Sharpsburg, Maryland”. The book is in octavo format and is roughly , 60 pages of writing and many pages of blanks. The book is written in pencil, sometimes worn, but mostly easily readable and understandable. The year 1835 is written in the book next to the name “H. Hancock” but this book probably dates to c.1860s, just like the other ones in the archive. It contains survey notes for sections of what is the C & O canal, it notes extensive measurements for locations on the Virginia shore. 4. Manuscript Notebook containing “Measurements, Specifications and drawings for repairing Locks and Dams” The notebook contains detailed measurements, damage assessments, and cost estimates for repairing various dams, locks and other fixtures along the route of the canal, presumably the Coal River Canal. Each dam is numbered and then described. The text is accompanied by detailed pencil sketches of the dams and locks. The book contains 16 pages of writing. Most of the book is blank. The text is in very good clean, legible condition. 5. Finally, there is a small black diary, almost entirely blank,presumably. It is entitled “Martinsburg March 16, 1871.” There is a small sketching of a man with in a hat, of which “Household Theology by J. H. Blunt” is written. There are also a few rudimentary calculations and mathematics accompanied by drawings of presumably dam-related shapes. The very last page contains a bit of writing that begins, “James D. Byers son of Charlotte (?) & John A. Byers. Color Sergeant in (?) 8th Regiment of confederate cavalry of the Northern Army of Va. Was killed instantly November 12th 1864 by ambush of Federals while bravely leading a charge of his regiment.” This little book may have been owned by James’ brother Charles, as the handwriting does not match John A. Byers’ but It is unclear. The collection also includes some miscellaneous material, letters, letter fragments, etc, similar to the types of calculations and assessments in the other notebooks. 
Price: 4455.99 USD
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18 COMMODORE [?] JOHN DOWNES 1852 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A PASSIONATE, OPINIONATED MAN WHO DETESTS THE FREE SOILERS, LADY'S BLOOMERS AND INTERFERING FOREIGNERS TRYING TO TELL AMERICANS 'WHAT IS WHAT'
CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS MASS MA 1852 Very Good Manuscript 
On offer is a superb, original, historically significant 1852 manuscript diary handwritten by John Downes of Cambridge, Massachusetts as evidenced by his two signatures. [While we cannot confirm ownership we believe the author is Commodore John Downes a famed American naval officer with a storied career who lived from 1786 to 1854. The writer's preoccupation with the weather, the wind direction and other comments give us no pause to suggest this ownership but a local historian or researcher should have little problem confirming.] The diary was created on blank pages sandwiched among and in-between, two 1852 Farmer's Almanacs, which in turn are laid into a hard bound covers by bookseller Kidder & Cheever of Boston. Bound in between the two almanacs are a number of pages used by Downes to record, almost on a daily basis, his thoughts, events, weather, politics, ornithology, etc. There are over 55 well filled pages handwritten in a tiny, very legible manner using the pages to maximum ability. Historians and collectors of the pre Civil War period will be hard pressed to find a more erudite observer and commenter on the era's politics, philosophy and current events. In fact Downes is very opinionated, passionate man and right from the beginning of the writing he affirms his indignation of women's bloomer and a professor 'trying to tell Americans what is what'. 'All being most of the materials for an American Revolution'. Downes begins the 1852 year by writing "Janry 1852- New Years Day. Very warm for the season. Yesterday closed with a rainy evening, and we had heavy showers through the night. The Year 1852 commences with a French Revolution on its hands. What else it may pick up on its way toward Doomsday remains mostly hidden; but we shall see quite fast enough. Already on hand we have Prof. Kossuth who is endeavoring to enlighten the benighted people of these Unites States on what is what, and other interesting particulars. We have Free Soilers and Abolitionists and Bloomers and Woman's-Right-ers and some other small materials for an American Revolution if the talent were equal to the will but happily, they are not world- compellers, they move not mountains, nor man, but themselves. Thermometer at bedtime 33 deg... He continues on with various snippets throughout the year, including, in part "[January] A woodpecker I saw this morning is beyond my present learning. It was not the Red-headed for his head was not red, but black as a newly caught fugitive slave… our harbors are being blocked with frost… our marine is being stripped of spars and rigging, and brought ashore and harnessed to horses. [Describes snow and the various adorned sleighs]… We saw one this afternoon in its semblance of a long black hull with "bright" varnished sides; and called the "Constitution" another fitted out as the "May Flower" both freighted down to the benches… we saw another which was fashioned something after the manner of a swan. I should judge the Captain and crew of this craft might count up to about sixty individuals…[reminisces about what sleighing was like 40 years before, then gives a creative discourse of tavern and drink vs. church]… Went to Boston … to attend Dr. A. B. Gould's lecture before the Lowell Institute…[thermometer bulb broke because of cold] … this evening we go to the Opera where Madam Anna Thillon is turning the heads of all Boston… saw Madam Thillon in the Black Domino. It is difficult to imagine the sad work a more beautiful woman would make amongst the youngsters, -- oldsters too, for that matter… went sleighing… past West Cambridge to Lexington and saw the monument erected on the spot where the first business were given when we fell out with John Bull nearly 80 years ago… finest sleigh ride we had for the last 20 years… Dined at Middlefield's and had a first rate old fashioned boiled Indian suet pudding; the first for many years… saw several heavy avalanches of snow…passing through Washington St. met an old friend, T[homas] Comer, the musician. Shook hands and talked to him of old times… his hair gray but otherwise he is not a day older than he was 20 years ago. Besides his profession as composer and musician he was an actor of much more than ordinary merit. I have never seen his equal in the character of the mock prince, Dandini, in Cinderella. Passed the evening at Mrs. Uphams where we had music and dancing… but the dancing… may I never set eyes on that abominable dog = polka again… Went to Boston… bought Dean's New England Farmer, not with any intention of digging an existence from the bowels of the earth, but that I love to read of matters of husbandry…rain has prevented our attending a Bissextile dancing party at Groton this evening … Spent weekend between Groton and Worcester with Dr. Green … Not at all pleased with the Lawrence Academy Administration. This administration… seems to have discovered a fearful clement of sin in the practice of dancing by young people at the juvenile gatherings called Balls… the young folks are were admonished to remain at home on the evening of the party given by the ladies of Groton (with Mrs. Governor Boutwell as lady patroness) on pain of the administration and heaven's serious disapprobation, and of everlasting expulsion from the Lawrence Academy and of ditto damnation… Attended Prof. Pierce's lecture on mechanics at the college this afternoon. Went to Boston, saw my friend Charles Bradlee [Bradlee was a Boston music publisher who was the first to copyright in 1835 the "A-B-C" song that everyone today knows as the song to teach kids the alphabet], the first time… for twelve years… [April] A furious northeast rain storm commenced last night. Wind blowing a hurricane. The storm has continued with unrelenting fury from [yesterday] until this morning. Last night we had lightening and thunder. The papers speak of many shipwrecks on the coast… Most of the inhabitants of the city of Cambridge have gone in to Boston today to partake of the [Lajos] Kossuth foolery that is going on there. The Freesoilers have got him and are striving, with their whole soul, to make a political honest penny out of him… [May] Had a call from my friend Obadiah Rich [Boston, Silversmith]. It is 12 years since I have seen him. Found him nearly blind… [June 21] News comes from Baltimore that Genl. Scott has been nominated by the Whig party as its candidate for the Presidency of these United States. O Trumpery! O Moses … Class day at the College… dancing, shouting and banners and instruments of music and noise. Uproarious cheering for President Sparks, for the Professors, each by name, for tutors, each by name, for Daniel Webster (louder yet), and for everybody and everything loudest of all. Attended Mrs. Spark's levee …quite a brilliant affair… Beauties from all points of the compass… Commencement Day at Harvard University. Did not attend the commencement exercises… Mrs. President Sparks party in the evening… on presenting ourselves she drew [his wife's] arm within her own, walked to the tables, and presented her with refreshments with her own hands and with her own easy irresistible manners. I have never seen my little wife more graceful, and beautiful, and I considered her fully entitled to the attentions she received… Worked hard at occultations all day; from anxiety to get them done seasonably for the U.S. Nautical Almanac… [July 16] attended the meeting of our scientific club in the evening. Most of the talking performed by Prof. Agassiz, who stoutly maintained that all the varieties of the human race, white, black, red, brown, etc. cannot owe their origin to one, common stock. Pity that some of our abolitionists could not have been present and have shown him his errors ... throughout New England and from out West we have complaints of a very severe drought… many factories stopped for want of water… storm… telegraph wires are down everywhere… unless the thirsty earth drank up the rain as it fell, we shall have no end to the account of mills and bridges destroyed… [Aug. 3] took a walk to Fresh Pond. Saw the two young grizzly bears there… [Aug 20] Spent the evening at Dr. Gould's, with Capt. Davis, Prof. [William] Chauvenet, and Prof. [Cornelius] Felton… [Sept. 15] Streets all mud, so that the sheep and cattle, on their way to Brighton to be butchered, have not the most delightful walking… [Oct 1] Bought of Drake a copy of the first English edition of Don Quixote. Date 1620… [Oct 29] Daniel Webster was buried at Marshfield on the 20 October 1852. His funeral was attended by several thousands of people. He died on the morning of the 24th and was 70 years old… [Nov. 8] Lucy Chase called this morning with Mrs. Bigelow. She gave me a kiss on parting which I shall not forget soon… [Lucy was an abolitionist and Freedman's teacher]… This month [December] so far has given us an uninterrupted season of warm Indian summer weather… our windows are open, and our thermometers makes nothing of getting as high as 65 or 70 degrees… Lilacs are coming into leaf again [What? man made global warming in 1852 too? ] Our fellow subjects in the Southern and Western parts of our Union have not been so fortunate. Prof. Winlock from Kentucky tells me that they have had winter there these four weeks… the folks in Siberia [saw] a total eclipse of the sun. It is feared several gongs were broken on the occasion… The Quebec Gazette says the sleighs are out and the mail steamers have gone into winter quarters… the skating club has commenced operations by erecting a skating saloon on the Queen's Wharf. But whenever it comes a lady's turn to sprawl herself and her petticoats all prone upon the ice with their heels gesticulating at the clouds; it is to be hoped that the gentlemen skaters have the good manners to look the other way. Unless, indeed, that Bloomerism has become an accepted revelation with the blue-nose sisterhood; in which case there will be no danger; and the gentlemen may look on and laugh… [gives a long and sarcastic rendition of a penance service he attended at church]… Went to Boston and procured $100 for Lottie. She calls it pin money. I can't for the life of me imagine what a lady can do with so many pins…. "The second almanac gives a printed reference to a Pro. Miller's death on Dec. 29, 1849. Downes concludes that this is Rev. William Miller, who founded the Millerite movement (present day Seventh Adventists) and the reference rankles Downes. He pens on the same page "And who the deuce is Pro. Miller? Or is it Prophet Miller, the true Millerite Messiah that our learned editor considers worthy of mention. Where is the apostle of Peace Johnny = missionary, and Col. Pluck? We would like to see mention of them!" The covers of the book are G to VG, the inside almanacs and pages in F to VF condition. 
Price: 4255.99 USD
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19 JOHN PRENTISS POE, GEORGE H. STEWART et al 1852 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LEGAL DOCUMENT SIGNED BY LOCAL BALTIMORE MARYLAND NOTABLES
Baltimore, Maryland MD 1852 Good Manuscript 
On offer is an original manuscript legal document from 1852 from Baltimore Maryland detailing the failure of one party to construct several houses on Oregon Street according to the contract. There are signatures of Thomas Willis, George H. Stewart and John P. Poe, who witnessed the document. [We believe John was the nephew of the poet Edgar Allen Poe through his mother, Josephine Clemm, a sister of Virginia Clemm (Edgar's wife), as well as also being a second cousin of Poe through his father. John Poe's father, Neilson Poe, was responsible for finding Edgar Allan Poe sick just before he died, and helping to bury him, even though Poe had despised him for opposing his marriage to Virginia. As such this document makes for a very interesting piece of Baltimore history from shortly after Edgar Allan Poe's death. John Prentiss Poe went on to become Attorney General of Maryland.] Another significant signature is of George H. Steuart (sometimes Stewart), who we believe is either the famous Confederate Civil War general from Baltimore, George H. Steuart (1828-1903) a Confederate brigadier General or his father Major General George H. Steuart (1790-1867) served during the War of 1812 and also during the Civil War as a militia general who ordered Maryland's militia troops to fight the Federal troops in some of the first action of the Civil War. The younger Steuart led troops at battles at First Bull Run, Shenandoah, Cross Keys, Gettysburg, Payne's Farm, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, and Appomattox. VG. 
Price: 855.99 USD
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20 JOHN S. MANN 1853 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED [ALS] BY NOTED QUAKER AND STATIONMASTER OF THE COUDERSPORT PA UNDERGROUND RAILROAD
COUDERSPORT PENNSYLVANIA POTTER COUNTY 1853 Good English 
On offer is an original manuscript letter handwritten by an important local Quaker reformer and Underground Railroad figure John S. Mann [1816-1879] who was a Quaker lawyer, born in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He was a teacher, but moved to Coudersport in 1841. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1842. He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives 1866-1868, 1871; School Director 1858-1872, Coudersport Burgess 1862-1865; and Editor of the Potter Journal 1874-1879. Mann was the Underground Railroad "Stationmaster" for Coudersport which was an important stop on the route used by escaping slaves. Both his home and the building where his wife's bookstore was located were used to hide slaves. The latter even had a secret room. His son Arthur said as a young boy it was "not uncommon to find a colored person at the breakfast table". This letter dated Nov 8, 1853 concerns settlers on the owner's lands addressed to 'Dear Sir' [but most likely to John Keating, elderly land owner of much land in Potter County, Pennsylvania]. Mann was an agent for John Keating [1760-1856] an Irish-French immigrant who bought 200,000 acres in northern Pennsylvania in 1796 and began selling it the next year. "Coudersport Nov 8, 1853 Dr Sir On my return I went to your lands, as you suggested, and made contracts with those settlers which had not already entered into contract. I succeeded in obtaining a contract with all but two and one of them was willing to do so, but his improvement had been sold at sheriff's sale, and the purchaser did not live in this county. The other one refused to contract and says he will hold by possession…. I am satisfied he cannot and I think Mr. Harwick [?] ought to take his lot at his own risk, as I can furnish you a purchaser who will take his contract, and not ask you to guarantee the possession of any of the lots. It took me so long to get over the tract that I am unable to make out a statement of the amount due on the old contracts, and so I enclose thirteen of them herewith. Will send the new contracts by next mail, together with a draft of the tracts, showing the amount and location of the lots sold, Yours truly Jno S. Mann". A receiving notation gives Mann's name again. Fold tear at top center, overall G. 
Price: 545.99 USD
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