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1 G I N 1818 SUPERB, ORIGINAL 600+ PAGE FRENCH MANUSCRIPT BOOK OF COMPLEX AND ADVANCED MATHEMATICS, GEOMETRY, STATISTICS, NAVIGATION AND MORE BEAUTIFULLY EXECUTED AND LITTERED WITH 100s OF DRAWINGS, GRAPHS AND CHARTS
1818 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is a superb early 19th Century manuscript relic of complex French mathematics and arithmetic education and scientific lore being a handwritten journal with over 600 pages of handwritten questions, theories, examples and other complex mathematical and geometric forms and equations including statistics and navigation being what appears to be an advanced student of the subject's personal workbook in a fine small hand and very attractively drawn mathematical diagrams throughout. Very fine precise writing illustrated throughout by graphs and geometric forms. We surmise the book was being prepared for final submission to their professor though not done given the title page was stopped with only the three faint letters: "G I N". Polished mottled calf and all edges gilt; internally, signs of stains and old mold stains to prelims and last section, notably last leaves, otherwise some intermittent toning and browning, slightly cocked. 8 vo., 19 x 13 cm. Overall G+. 
Price: 8855.99 USD
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2 K.N. (Kirkland Newton) COWING 1858 - 1861 EXTRAORDINARY ARCHIVE OF 30+ ORIGINAL LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG, INQUISITIVE MAN DETAILING THE FRAUGHT AND TENSE PRE CIVIL WAR ERA AND HIS EVENTUAL ENLISTMENT WITH THE UNION ARMY TO FIGHT AGAINST THE CONFEDERACY
CINCINNATI OHIO, [to LARUE COUNTY, KENTUCKY 1860 Very Good Manuscript 
On offer is an archive of fascinating and extraordinary letters dating from right before the Civil War, to its very beginning, 1858-1861. The vast majority of the letters are from 1859 and 1860. The letters document the fraught political upheaval taking place at the time and the tense years that led up to the civil war. It goes up to the start of the war and also documents the author being mustered into the Union Army. The author of these letters is named K. N. (Kirkland Newton) Cowing. He is eventually stationed at Camp Wickliffe in Larue County, Kentucky. This camp was the assembly and training camp of Brigadier General William Nelson's 4th Division of the Union's Army of the Ohio, eventually ending up with Company A of the 6th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with Nicholas Longworth Anderson as Colonel. Almost every single letter in this group is addressed to his brother: Judge & Attorney Rufus B. Cowing, Esq. of New York. Rufus, the recipient of these letters, had quite a background and is very interesting in his own right. The only letters not written to Rufus are three to his mother, and one written by a sister. There are 31 letters in the group, the majority mentioning politics and the looming war. He also mentions becoming the President of a Debating Society and that’s where many, if not most, of the political questions arise. K.N. Cowing presents himself as a very smart young man, discussing these sensitive and difficult topics well and with knowledge. He is solidly for the Union side of the war, but also seems to believe quite strongly in State’s Rights, wishing the North had not gotten itself involved with the Slavery Question. “I belong to no Geographical party and whether slavery is right or wrong is none of my business unless the question comes up in my state,” he writes once. He was also quite keen on getting into West Point and discussed this with his brother. K. N. Cowing was born in 1843 and it is very interesting to know that these letters were written by a very young man. The letters show him to be very bright, but still learning and exploring his life. He enters the army in 1860, at the age of 17. Included in the archive are also five of the original envelopes to which the letters were sent to Rufus. As well, there is also a photo "carte de visite" of an officer. It is unclear how he fits in with the family. The photo was found with the letters. I am not sure if he was a family friend his name is written on the reverse of the image. Lt (David) P. Richardson 6th N.Y. Cav- and the date Nov, 1861. David P. Richardson would eventually become a U.S. Representative from New York after serving over three years in the Union Army. The letters are all in good to very good condition. Some contains rips and tears, but they are small and do not affect the integrity of the letter. Only one letter has a large rip which makes the letter require a bit more fragile handling. All of K. N. Cowing’s handwriting is legible and easy to read throughout. The ink shows little signs of fading. There are a number of different types of paper on which the letters are written, but the most common is a sturdy, blue paper which has kept very well over the last 150 years. Here are some excerpts from the letters. There is, of course, much, much more to discover in this fascinating archive that give a remarkably interesting and detailed look at the environment and society of the North, right before the most destructive war in United States history. “Glendale Ohio, Nov 13, 1858. We have a Debating Society here and the next question for the debate is whether Slavery is right or wrong. I am on the affirmative that it is right, but of course that is against my principals but of course some person must take that side and it devolved on me.”; “Glendale Ohio, Dec 21,1858. We have a Debating Society and last time they elected me for President. Our last subject for debate was whether ‘The freed Negroes of the United States should be allowed to vote.’ Many of the members thought if they were allowed to vote they might have a ‘Wooley Head’ for President of the U.S. For if they were allowed to vote they would of course have the right of being chosen to office. What is your opinion of the question? Our next subject for debate is whether ‘War is necessary.’ Have you any good speeches? if so send it to me.”; “Cincinnati, Dec 3,1860. Dear Brother, I received your letter in due time and I was glad to hear from you for I had almost thought that you had got so immersed in politics and was so gleeful over Lincoln’s election that you died for joy. Yes as you say Lincoln is elected but from appearances he will rule over only half the U.S. for with whatever jest you may pay over the grumblings as you call it of a distracted party there is a great deal of trouble get in store. N****s out of the question and we indivisible divided we fall. That is what I think but a great deal depends on Lincoln himself and what party he selects his cabinet for if he selects it from the Republican Party he will have a sectional one and that is what I hope he will not do from OPF’s message he seems to wave all responsibility and leave everything for Lincoln if i was in hopes he would redeem his character and give is a message that would recall the days of Jackson didn’t you. Well I go in for the Union my mottoes are Union now and forever one unresponsible. No sectional party do away with all geographical parties.”; “Jan 27, 1860, Cincinnati. Dear Brother, Your last letter I received this week and was very glad to from you in regard to politics I am afraid that there is disunionist North as South and that the rights of the South have been disregarded. Many in regard to slavery question lose sight that is the laws of the Land. They say the platform of the Union Party means nothing but it means everything. Constitution of the United States and its interpretation by the Supreme Court. I am for the Union out and out but the South has a party as well as the North. I say the ministry should let politics alone and not make it a principal of the church the great principal is whether man is capable of self government or not at all other questions ought to be ignored...Mother has gone to Jamestown I have not heard from her in sometime. What a great humbug this great talk of which we will lose the most and which will be the gainer. It is as sensible as it would be for the words of a watch or anything else to talk of separation. United we Stand divided we fall and with regard to Coercion it can’t be for it would be Brothers against Brothers and soon against Fathers. When ministry learn their duty and preach peace instead of war & newspapers confine themselves to their business instead of misrepresenting affairs then will there be peace. I belong to no Geographical party and whether slavery is right or wrong is none of my business unless the question comes up in my state. When will the North learn to mind their own business but enough for once. Write soon.”; Cincinnati July 23,1860. I am glad you like the Law and hope you will succeed in your profession, so you are changed from Fillmore well if you engage in politics I advise you not to change so often although your Vice President is a stray sheep from the folds of Democracy. Well my great principle is Americans to rule America. I think that Henry Clay was right when he said that foreigners should stay 21 years here before they could vote or at least longer than 5. Have you seen the “Great Eastern” What do you think of that English ship?”; Camp Wickliffe Feb 4,1862. Dear Brother, Your last letter I received a few days ago and also the Herold and World in the same mail.I am trying to buy the house next to mothers and giving it to her and I will do all I can towards it and if you will take this matter in hand I think we could manage it. I wish you could be with me for a short time but I think seclipin is as the boys have it here about played out. ‘What is the opinion of New Yorkers?’ The victory was read the day after the battle and the news being read to the Regiments it was concluded by these remarkable words: ‘The Union must & shall be preserved! By Order Regt. Gen. Nelson per G .W. Kendrick's acting adjutant.’ And we think that if Nelson says anything it has to be done. We have an inspection of quarters every Sunday and last Sunday Nelson Pronounced our tent the best of the Division said it was no wonder none of us were sick and declared we lived better than himself and said an order for the Company Officers of other Regiments to visit our quarters and take pattern after them it has been raining for some days but has stopped and we expect to advance as soon as the roads get dry...Our Regiment has the advance and all the rest of the Regiments are calling us Nelson’s ‘Pets’ and they say he gives us the best chance. Nelson was very much disliked at first by the Grey’s but he is treating all alike making offices as well privates do their duty.” (Background: Kirkland Newton Cowing was born in 1843. As a Private in the Union Army, he would eventually be killed in action in Chickamauga, Georgia, in September 1863, most probably at the Battle of Chickamauga, fought on September 18–20. 1863 Rufus Billings Cowing (1840-1906) was a New York City Judge and Wall Street lawyer. He served for 28 years and had been involved in some sensational criminal and political corruption cases. His career intertwined with the history of New York City. After leaving the courts, he entered private practice by joining his son’s firm on Wall Street. Cowing was born in Jamestown, New York in 1840. Cowing’s father died when Cowing was just 5 years old. At age 12, he came to New York City where he attended boarding school until he entered the Polytechnic Institute in Brooklyn from which he graduated in 1861. Next, he clerked at a bank for a short while and then decided to enter a law career. He worked for and studied at a New York City law firm for about two years and then entered Harvard University’s Law School, graduating in 1865. He practiced law in New York City and got involved in politics.) OVERALL: VG 
Price: 4455.99 USD
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3 M.N. ROWAN 1864 - 1874 ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF EIGHT [8] MANUSCRIPT DIARIES HANDWRITTEN BY A KEY RAILROAD EXECUTIVE RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN WAR IN DENMARK
EXETER ENGLAND AARHUS COPENHAGEN DENMARK 1864 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is a fascinating and historical archive of eight [8] original manuscript diaries handwritten by M.N. Rowan, an upper management railway man, concerning his work with British and foreign railways who starting in 1864 is right in the middle of the Schleswig-Holstein War and a key player in many ways. There are 7 more diaries running through 1874. Rowan is sporadic in his entries sometimes merely noting travel, hotels stayed in then more complete notes on Board meetings, appointments of a NY engineer, trips to Hamburg, Cologne, Lubeck, Malmo, Copenhagen, Aarhus and many, many more. Researchers and historians of the Schleswig - Holstein War will realize that Rowan is right in the middle of the conflict in Denmark from February 1864 and on. Through March he notes troop movements, skirmishes etc some from reports and many from personal observations. Notes as to operations in the cities run from details to travel notes with many interesting observations: 'Traffic on railway stopped by government. Engaged all day in clearing line to carry troops.' Interestingly he uses the word 'intelligence' often as in sending an agent to gain intelligence regarding the status of the conflict affecting the rail lines. He also will write an entry 'No new intelligence.' Again, interestingly he notes: 'Cavalry after my horses.' He learns of an Armistice before it happens through 'intelligence and then General Falkenstein gives him direction as to when the Armistice will end. Synopsis by year: 1864 writings include undated notes on blank pages of diary to sporadic entries as to location and travel. The year begins with a page and a half note regarding some conflict in the building of a railroad: 'Behn came out in the afternoon. Tells me that [Col.] Winterfield sent for him and told him that if he did not put within 48 hours a declaration that the railway should be put in working order he would destroy it.' The notes go on to detail further complications, difficulty in getting parts, huge outlays of money that a party did not wish to do, trying to buy an engine in Aarhus [Denmark] and in the end all correspondence going to a General Falkenstein. 1865, 1866, 1867 finds Rowan in Copenhagen Denmark through January and then he spends February in Frederica and throughout Denmark for the year. The diaries then skip two 1871 diaries [curiously we can find no reason for two and they both contain different entries though one appears to be more financially oriented] and while based in Denmark he is now doing a fair amount of travel to Germany and Belgium and then to England. 1872 Mr. Rowan is still in England and spends his time in Cornwall mentioning St. Blazey, Truro etc. The final diary in the archive, 1874, has few entries and mainly of a financial or expense type. There are a small number of ephemeral items tucked inside adding a bit more depth to the archive. Not the most prolific of diarists we would guess that the diaries are about 40% used some more some less. The original green cloth almanacs are Overall G+. 
Price: 2085.99 USD
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4 MRS. N. L. TUDOR 1887 - 1890 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL AND DIARY OF THE TUDOR FAMILY - FROM A LONG LINE OF PRIESTS, VICARS, DEACONS, REVERENDS AND BISHOPS
BEDFORD BEDFORDSHIRE ENGLAND GREAT BRITAIN 1887 Good Manuscript 
On offer is an incredible, intimate look into the life and times of The Tudor Family of Bedford, Befordshire, England. Though she always refers to herself as "self" there are numerous other references to identify the author of this detailed day by day account as Mrs. N. L. Tudor, wife of E.T. Tudor [research suggests they have a role in St. Paul's Cathedral], mother to Mervyn, Gwen and Howell and that they are family from a large family of vicars, priests, deacons and reverends. A casual reading notes priest-relatives in New Zealand and one very interesting entry is regarding a relative, Hugh Aldersly Tudor, as returning from the Medicine Hat Diocese of the Canadian North West Territories. A later note refers to a daughter born to the Canadian branch of Tudor's in Ottawa. Handwritten the journal dates from 1887-1890 and is an account of life at Bedford as it began for the Tudors who arrived at Bedford from Burnham, Somerset on Thursday September 8th 1887. Where our author does not specify herself or her husband she excels in naming visitors, friends and relatives and as such this diary will provide a wealth of genealogical information besides being a super look at the times. Also noted was her apparent delight in seeing a game of 'La Crosse' played in the common. This hardbound black note book, 4vo, both boards nearly detached, most of spine missing, at the end of each year covered a page is set aside for 'remarkable events in our family & friends during the year' and many clippings attached. A casual reading finds dozens of names for visitors, friends and staff. Some drawings on both boards, some newspaper cuttings stuck in, some pressed leaves. Good save for the boards. 
Price: 1585.99 USD
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5 ROSCOE CHARLES MOODY, U.S.N. ENGINEER DIVISION 1894 - 1896 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT CRUISE NOTES OF THE NOTED USS NEW YORK WHILE COMMANDED BY THE RENOWNED 'FIGHTING BOB' EVANS HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG NAVAL CADET WHO WOULD ONE DAY COMMAND THE USS MAINE AND BE AWARDED THE NAVY CROSS
ASEA ABOARD U.S.S. NEW YORK 1894 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a superb, original late 19th Century manuscript journal detailing a 'shakedown' cruise of the noted USS New York under the command of Robley Dungliston 'Fighting Bob' Evans handwritten and compiled by Naval Cadet Roscoe Charles Moody. This folio book which has approximately 70 pages of entries, notes and observations regarding the running of the ship from a technical perspective. Dated December 1894 to April 1896 there are seven distinct sections and includes several ephemeral items tucked in; 15 printed forms used for checkups on the ship's engines, three pages of handwritten calculations, two oversize sheets of Standard Compass Swinging with Starboard helm and Standard Compass Swinging with post helm includes Mean Deviations and Determination of the Variation, plus 1 blue print of coastal defenses of Havana Cuba. Section 1 covers 27 pages and was examined and approved as 'Excellent' by noted Captain Robley Dungliston 'Fighting Bob' Evans, dated 7 December 1894. This report contains information on the hull, main engines, water service and fire pumps, main feed pumps, as well as other pumps, steering engines, blowers and ventilation, main boiler blower, other boilers, propellers, etc., much information about the ships systems, with diagrams of some of them, plus a longer report headed General Description of Propelling Machinery U.S.S. New York. The other six reports deal with other aspects of the ship and were dated and approved by Captain Evans, as well as Captain Winfield Scott Schley. The reports range between eight to 13 pages, and are dated 7 Jan. 1895; 1 Mar. 1895; 1 Feb. 1896; 2 Mar. 1896, W. S. Schley; and 9 April. We learn from a casual read that the U.S.S. New York was a twin screw armored cruiser and was built and equipped ready for service by the William Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Building Company of Philadelphia, PA, the designs throughout having been furnished by the Navy Department. The contract prize was $2,985,000, and the requirement as to speed was that the vessel should maintain a speed of 20 knot for four consecutive hours with an air pressure in the fire rooms not exceeding 2½ inches of water, it having been further stipulated that a premium of $50,000 should be paid to the contractors for every quarter knot made in excess of this requirement, and that a penalty of $50,000 should be extracted from them for every quarter knot deficiency. Assigned to the South Atlantic Squadron, the New York departed New York Harbor on 27 December 1893 for Rio de Janeiro, arriving at Taipu Beach in January 1894, she remained there until heading home on 23 March, via Nicaragua and the West Indies. Transferred to the North Atlantic Squadron in August, the cruiser returned to West Indian waters for winter exercises and was commended for her aid during a fire that threatened to destroy Port of Spain, Trinidad. Returning to New York, the cruiser joined the European Squadron in 1895, and steamed to Kiel, where she represented the United States at the opening of the Kiel Canal. Rejoining the North Atlantic Squadron, New York operated off Fort Monroe, Charleston, and New York through 1897. The New York departed Fort Monroe on 17 January 1898 for Key West. After the declaration of the Spanish American War in April, she steamed to Cuba and bombarded the defenses at Matanzas before joining other American ships at San Juan in May, seeking the Spanish squadron. Not finding them, they bombarded El Morro Castle at San Juan (12 May) before withdrawing. New York then became the flagship of Admiral William T. Sampson's squadron, as the American commander planned the campaign against Santiago. The Battle of Santiago de Cuba on 3 July resulted in the complete destruction of the Spanish fleet. The cruiser sailed for New York on 14 August to receive a warrior's welcome. The next year, she cruised with various State naval units to Cuba, Bermuda, Honduras, and Venezuela, and conducted summer tactic. There are 17 tipped in illustrations, plus 14 in text illustrations, illustrations are all hand drawn in ink, bound in contemporary half leather, cloth covered boards, lacks spine, boards shaken, corners and edges worn, written in ink, in a legible hand. Overall G. BIO NOTES form one online source: Captain Roscoe Charles Moody (b. 12 Mar 1873, Biddeford, Maine) was the son of Biddeford bank executive Charles A. Moody. Capt. Moody graduated from the US Naval Academy as an engineer in 1894. During World War I he commanded the USS Maine, for which he was awarded the Navy Cross. He served as head of the Dept. of Mathematics at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis. He was very active at the academy, taking part in football, being on both the winning intramural team, and the Navy football team which beat Army that year! He was also in the choir. Moody also spent time teaching at the academy. He published a book called "The Oscillations of Ships" which was used for the instruction of the cadets for years. 
Price: 3655.99 USD
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6 JAMES ROBERT WHITE, DELTA SIGMA PHI, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, C.C.N.Y. 1908 - 1923 ARCHIVE OF SIX (6) HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DIARIES - SENSATIONAL LOOK AT TURN OF THE CENTURY MAN ABOUT TOWN IN NEW YORK CITY THROUGH WORLD WAR I
New York, New York 1908 Very Good Manuscript 
Sensational archive of six (6) diaries [1908 - 1913 in a Line A Day 5 year notebook style diary, then 1914, 1915, 1919, 1920, 1923] detailing over 15 years in the the life of James Robert White; a teacher of music and choral tradition at both Columbia University and City College of New York (CCNY), a student taking some courses and attending lectures at Columbia and a very sociable 'man about town' who goes out nearly everyday and sometimes multiple times turing the day to catch a concert here or a show there. He is very erudite, very insightful and compulsive in many of these writings. Of particular note: in the 5 year diary his entries are copious and he sometimes writes upside down to maximize the space and keep daily writings on the same page. The five year also offers up a mystery the author never answers - the diary starting in 1908, is faithfully written throughout but for some reason there is not a single word written of 1912 and no clue or hint why White would write madly, hardly ever missing a day for 4 years right up until December 31st, 1911, and then not another word until January 1st, 1913. Otherwise, White records every person he meets, has lunch or dinner with, a one word or line critique on the hundreds of shows he sees and concerts he attends not to mention all manner of comments on his myriad of meetings for school and social life. He has two children - boys - but never a mention of a Mrs. and it is hard to get a handle on which if any of his frequent dates are more special than the others. He does go out alot with the wives of his associates usually to artistic functions. Here are some snippets: "Am delighted to exchange alnight with Miss H. whom I consider one of my most intelligent friends. She is almost masculinely masterful in what she does." "Expected a call from Mr. Faye but he did not come. He is like many musicians unreliable and not much for working with." "Feeling fairly well used up. Did not sleep well last night. My social pleasures must be curtailed and help me in work." I could go on and on. A more detailed reading of this many hundreds of pages within this archive will I am sure reveal much more about this fascinating, educated, social man. The 5 year is 8vo. 1914 is 48mo and the rest in between. The 5 year is fragile with regard to the cover but interior is very fine. The others average good+ to VG. 
Price: 985.99 USD
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7 WILLARD N. KNOWLES 1911 - 1921 and 1926 ORIGINAL ARCHIVE OF MANUSCRIPT DIARIES [2] AND EPHEMERA INCLUDING PHOTOS OF A CHIEF ENGINEER AND MERCHANT SEAMAN PLYING HIS TRADE ON BOTH SIDES OF THE ATLANTIC
AT SEA ABOARD THE S.S. ARLINGTON et al 1911 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is a group of colourful, original early 20th Century manuscript diaries [2] and an archive of photos and documents handwritten by Merchant Seaman Willard N. Knowles who details an interesting life in both 100+ page books while at sea serving as Chief Engineer aboard several vessels with ports of call including Africa, Cuba, Nova Scotia and the Panama Canal and many, many more. Diary 1 is a 3¼ x 6 inch book having entries dated from 1911through 1921. Willard writes of illnesses aboard the ships, rough seas, loading and discharging of cargo, dealing with behavioural issues involving the ship's firemen (he threatens to put them in irons), robbery aboard the ship, firing the drunken cook, the beauty of Cuba, weather conditions, ship inspections, laying and lifting of the anchor, logging the ship's course, including latitude, longitude, maintenance and much, much more. Here are some snippets: "Resigned as chief engineer of S.S. Arlington, Oct. 8, 1919, [on] account of poor boilers, not satisfactorily repaired for voyage to France…"Feb. 21 - 1919…went aboard S.S. Lake Jessup as chief engineer…bound to Niguero, Cuba. Arrived at Manzanillo, Cuba, to custom house…Went out on plantation in sugar cane field…very pretty through the presidential gardens. March 7 this prettiest sight I ever saw…March 16 pump broke laying to repairing for eight hours. Very rough sea. 600 miles from land…Mar 17 midnight rain storm. Wind Southwest - only making 6 nautical miles per hour on account pumps not working good…plugged up with grass…Left N.Y. Dec. 12, 1919 for Nuevitas, Cuba for sugar for Boston…Left Nuevitas for Boston Dec. 2 at 8 AM, had very heavy weather, head wind and had to put into Norfolk, VA for bunker coal…April 24 some trouble with firemen. Had to have some in my room to lecture & threaten to put them in irons if they refused duty again…Dec. 30, 1920, Robbers came on this ship and stole 3 coils rope valued at $250 and 100 gallons paint value $300 and 4 cases cream, 6 cases condensed milk and six cases soap…Extra watchmen on deck all night…" Overall G+. Diary 2 chronicles his duties and observations while serving as Chief Engineer aboard the tugboat George S. Tice out of Port Richmond, Staten Island. Dated 1926, Knowles writes of all manner of ship board life: the weather, the crew, the duties, the problems and of course mess conditions, ship inspections, laying and lifting of the anchor, logging the ship's course, including latitude, longitude, maintenance of ships, selling of tugs, an explosion in Brooklyn and wages earned and much, much more. "April 25 [1927] Sunday took one scow to Hackensack and came out with two. Run into the west wrung of the west side of draw and tore it to pieces and broke the stern scow so it leaked three feet of water…in ¾ hour…Stopped at Marion and pumped out scow but it filled up two feet faster than the cypher would take it out…Capt. West came and looked it over and we took the scow to McWilliams Dry Dock…Oct. 4, 1926, Cook came in drunk and Captain fired him Oct. 18, 1926 Monday Cold wind and hail storm so the dock was nearly white…Paid off fireman this morning. He was drunk. Couldn't work…Heavy explosion in Brooklyn…Looked like a ship blowing up with powder..." The 7.5 x 5 inch book is in very good condition with expected soiling, mostly to one cover; some ink feathering, but writing is clear and readable. Overall G+. The archive also includes a one page, DS, New York, June 1, 1938, Seaman's Certificate of Identification from the U.S. Department of Commerce with his attached photo and thumbprint, plus a partly printed DS Citizens Seaman's Identification Card originating at the Port of Boston, Feb. 21, 1919, plus a Collector of Customs envelope, two real postcards of Knowles, one in a seaman' uniform, 5" x 7 ½", plus a studio portrait of Knowles as a younger gentleman, 6" x 8", and a turn-of-the-century portrait of a young lady identified as Mrs. Lillian Knowles (his wife) on studio mount. Folds to Seaman's Certificate of Identification. Toning and soiling to Citizens Seaman Identification. Envelope is heavily soiled and tattered on left. Photographs have expected soiling, one with some silvering, but very much intact. 
Price: 3255.99 USD
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8 A.N. NELSON 1919 - 1920 HANDWRITTEN JOURNAL HANDWRITTEN BY A CREW MEMBER OF THE U.S.S. BIRMINGHAM FLAGSHIP OF THE PACIFIC FLEET’S DESTROYER SQUADRON AS IT PERFORMS POST - WW1 DUTIES, EXERCISES AND NAVY PUBLICITY ALONG THE WEST COAST OF AMERICA
SAN DIEGO LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA CA PANAMA CANAL 1919 Good Manuscript 
On offer is a journal and diary of A. N. Nelson, a crew member on the U.S.S. Birmingham, the flagship of the Pacific Fleet’s Destroyer Squadron shortly after the end of World War 1. The diary is entitled above the first entry, “Cruise of U.S.S. Birmingham with Pacific Fleet on West Coast.” This is an accurate description of what takes place in the book. From July 17, 1919 to November 22, 1920, Nelson recounts the passage of the Birmingham as it leaves the Boston Navy Yard, goes through the Panama Canal, and then anchors in San Diego to serve as Flagship of the Pacific Fleet’s Destroyer Squadron. The whole book is written in one long, continuous paragraph. There are no stops or paragraph breaks. For the most part, the book is a matter-of-fact retelling of dates, positions, and activities of the Birmingham. There are also small breaks where Nelson recounts what he sees on board the ship as well as his days of shore leave and pleasure. The book begins, “Left Boston Navy Yard Thursday, July 17 after near six months repair work...First run started on our way for West Coast. The night before we pulled out we had a draft of 200 new recruits to replace the men paid off. I was on deck when we pulled out and felt kind of blue leaving after being near home for so long.” The ship passes through the Panama Canal on route to the West Coast. “We could see the part of the Canal the French Government started to build some old rusted dredges and dirt cans and old twisted nails. Well it took us about six hours to go through the canal there being six locks to pass.” At the end of July the ship reaches Balboa, Panama. Nelson takes shore leave and goes to watch a bullfight and cockfighting, remarking that “I don’t think much of their sports over here.” Leaving Balboa with a formation of 21 destroyers (all at the Birmingham’s stern) the squadron heads to San Diego, where they are met with scores of spectators. After a quick shore leave to Los Angeles and then San Francisco, the ship moves on to Portland, Oregon, going down the Columbia River. Nelson remarks often on the beautiful scenery and mountains of the Pacific Northwest. As Flagship of the Pacific Fleet’s Destroyer Squadron, Nelson writes of the various patrols, war games, and training that the Birmingham participates up and down the West Coast. There are also passages devoted to shore leave in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Portland, as well as the occasional boat race against another destroyer. At the end of January, 1920, the Birmingham receives an emergency call at 2 A.M. from the army transport ship Mt. Vernon which has sprung a leak 500 miles out of San Francisco. The Birmingham escorts her back to harbor. In April, the Birmingham anchors in Pearl Harbor, and the Nelson visits the “Volcano Kilauea, which is the only active volcano that you can look into.” For the rest of the year, the Birmingham goes up and down the West Coast, being more a representative of the American Navy than anything else. In the summer of 1940 it even represents “the Navy in the American Legion Convention.” in Astoria, Oregon. The diary ends at the end of November 1920, with the Birmingham heading for San Diego “making 21 knots,” arriving in San Diego where the ship is refueled “five hundred fifteen tons” of coal. There are three loose newspaper clippings accompanying the writing, all relating to WW1 or the Birmingham directly. The book has 14 pages of writing, with each page except the last being full of writing. The book begins with about 10 pages of blank space and finishes with about 35 blank pages as well. Nelson’s handwriting is clean and crisp, very easy to read in a slightly faded black ink. It seems at a later date, Nelson might have gone back over or expanded some sections, as they are in a distinctly darker ink. The cover is cloth and shows a good deal of wear, but is still fully attached, and the name “A. N. Nelson,” can be faintly read at the top. There are a few words underneath that look to be “301st section” but they are considerably more faint. The whole book is in good condition. (Background: USS Birmingham (CS-2/CL-2), named for the city of Birmingham, Alabama, was a Chester-class scout cruiser, reclassified a light cruiser in 1920. Entering service in 1908, the ship became known for the first airplane takeoff from a ship in history in 1910. During World War I, Birmingham escorted convoys across the Atlantic. The cruiser was decommissioned in 1923 and sold for scrap in 1930. Following America's entrance into World War I, Birmingham patrolled along the northeast U.S. coast until 14 June 1917, when she sailed from New York as part of the escort for the first US troop convoy to France. After returning to New York she was fitted for service in Europe and in August reported to Gibraltar as flagship for Rear Admiral A. P. Niblack, Commander, US Forces Gibraltar. She escorted convoys between Gibraltar, the British Isles, and France until the Armistice. After a short cruise in the eastern Mediterranean, she returned to the United States in January 1919. From July 1919 to May 1922, she was based at San Diego, California as flagship of Destroyer Squadrons, Pacific Fleet, and then moved to Balboa, Canal Zone as flagship of the Special Service Squadron. After cruising along the Central American and northern South American coast, she returned to Philadelphia and was decommissioned there on 1 December 1923, being sold for scrap on 13 May 1930. Commanders: Franck Taylor Evans: 28 April 1919 – November 1919; George Bertram Landenberger: 1920 onwards.) 
Price: 2455.99 USD
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9 ROSE and SALEEM N. SABA 1921 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY OF EMIGREES TO TORONTO CANADA WHO RETURN OF THE NEWLY ESTABLISHED COUNTRY OF SYRIA
TORONTO ONTARIO CANADA ZAHLAH SYRIA LEBANON 1921 Very Good 
On offer is an interesting and unique 1921 manuscript diary handwritten primarily by Rose Saba and sometimes, we believe, by her husband Saleem N. Saba. The free end paper states their names and 'Now in Zahlah Syria Former Res. Toronto Ont. Canada.' [We note that Zahlah is part of Lebanon today.] Entries are for the most part in English but there are entries in Arabic which we believe Saleem wrote. Rose writes many interesting entries which range from Saleem's travels throughout to Beirut, Damascus and her own doings at home from the mundane such as ironing, meals, visits and news from home. We also note that they are a Christian family as they frequently go to church. The diary was located in Toronto and we hypothesize that they moved back from Syria at some point. Historians and researchers of early independent Syria and Lebanon will no doubt find this diary an interesting and unique travel relic of the times. Overall VG. 
Price: 2355.99 USD
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10 W.N. KEESY 1928 + 1929 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT DIARIES SEAL HUNTER, FARMER AND ACTIVE REPUBLICAN WILLARD, OHIO
Willard, Ohio 1928 Good+ Manuscript 
Offered Here Are Two Original Handwritten Diaries Belonging To W.N. KEESY, A SEALER, FARMER AND ACTIVE REPUBLICAN WHO HAILED FROM THE WILLARD, OHIO AREA. Written in ink and quite legible. The diaries are complete for the years of 1928 and 1929. Literally hundreds of entries. Each measures when opened 6" x 7". The journals were written in "Excelsior Diaries". Several receipts tucked in the rear pockets. Include here are just a few snippets of his entires in the diaries; "WENT OVER TO PARKE'S AND GOT HIS TEAM AND DRAWED MANURE ON GARDEN AND PLOWED IT. GOT IN TELEPHONE POLES, KEPT TEAM TO NIGHT EXPECT TO USE THEM TOMORROW. I WENT TO NORWALK TO TEST A FEW PUMPS FOR STANDARD OIL CO. GOT THINGS READY TO GO TO COLUMBUS IN THE MORNING TO SEALER'S CONVENTION. IN P.M. I WENT TO DELPHI & WILLARD. EVA CAME OUT JUST BEFORE DINNER AND IS GOING TO STAY UNTIL I GET BACK FROM COLUMBUS. TO ATTICA THEN DOWN TO CROOKS, IN THE P.M. TO NORWALK AND STAYED FOR REPUBLICAN BANQUET. FRANCES RIDDLE CAME HOME WITH ME. GOT HOME ABOUT 11 O' CLOCK." 
Price: 685.99 USD
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11 LIEUTENANT N.H.V. BROWN, Department of National Defense 1941 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A DEDICATED CANADIAN JUNIOR OFFICER DEDICATED TO CANADA'S NATIONAL DEFENSE
GUELPH ONTARIO ON CANADA 1941 Very Good French 
On offer is a super, original 1941 manuscript relic of Canadian National Defense during World War II. This diary was handwritten by Lieutenant N.H.V. Brown, Department of National Defense C.A.C. 26th ATB (G + S.F.) C.A. of Guelph Ontario. Intensely busy most of the time from lecturing on 'falling' [parachuting most likely] to lectures on CPR, to being defense counsel for a military trial to responsibility for accepting four [4] RAM tanks plus a hundred other duties and responsibilities Lt. Brown is not only keenly observant and dedicated to his tasks but also a keen diarist leaving the historian and researcher of Canadian Home Defense in the mid War years in super detail never missing a day and save for 'Slept late' on a Sunday details the highlights of his day are delivered in full. VG+ 
Price: 2055.99 USD
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12 LEN KEMP, R.N. 1946 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT POST WORLD WAR II DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A ROYAL NAVY PILOT SAILING THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA ABOARD THE BRITISH AIRCRAFT CARRIER HMS TRIUMPH
ABOARD THE HMS TRIUMPH 1946 Good+ Manuscript 
On offer is an interesting, original 1946 diary handwritten by a Royal Navy Pilot serving aboard the British Aircraft Carrier HMS Triumph. The author L[en] Kemp creates a very full detail laden account of his time aboard ship from 1946 through the first month of 1948. Much of 1947 was spent in or around Malta with trips to Greece, Larnaca and Tripoli +++. Many of his days are spent on flying exercise but he also includes details of his leisure time including deck hockey and deck football, swimming, and going ashore on liberty with his friends, visits to restaurants for what he describes as "Big Eats." Notably he records visits made on board by the Queen and the two Princesses, as well as a later visit by the King of Greece. The 4 x 3 inch book is G+. 
Price: 1495.99 USD
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13 N. 1998 - 2005 ORIGINAL DIARIES, SCRAPBOOKS [7] AND RELATED EPHEMERA DETAILING ONE YOUNG WOMAN'S DESCENT INTO DRUG ABUSE, SEXUAL ADDICTION AND OBSESSION AND HER REHABILITATION
1998 Good+ 
On offer is an incredible archive of seven [7] diaries and scrapbooks along with related ephemera detailing the fall and rise of one young woman's life issues involving an ever increasing drug and alcohol addiction, her sexual obsession and addiction and her desperate attempts to improve her life and put her addictions behind her. The scrapbooks are all encompassing: Correspondence, Love Letters, Printed Emails, Poems, Hate Letters, Christmas Cards, Birthday Cards, Photographs, Small Written Notes, & Musings to and from her friends, family and enablers. In her words: "I was a young woman lost and struggling with the mundaneness of life. My Father died suddenly when I was 21 years old and I was left to find my own way in the world. I battled constantly with alcoholism, marijuana addiction, and sadly a very low sense of self-worth. I suffered from chronic Clinical Depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder which went unnoticed and undiagnosed because I became a master at hiding behind my smile, and behind the smoke screen I created which I called 'my life'. This journal exposes thoughts and actions I cringe about when I read today. Sometimes I find it difficult to believe 'I' was that person as it feels a lifetime away from who I am now. This is the reason I have decided to let go of these journals after all these years. I'm happy with who I am today. My life is simple and beautiful, and I don't feel I need any reminders of where I have come from, or the battles I have endured and overcome to get where I am in life." Collectors and researchers will find a very broad but deep look into this woman's life as she offers an inordinately intimate look at the spiral down and upward climb through her addiction experience. We withhold he name and location for privacy concerns. Overall G+. 
Price: 3085.99 USD
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