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19th Century Ephemera

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19th Century Ephemera

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1 A.S. 1859 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE RARE AND UNUSUAL METEOROLOGICAL EVENT KNOWN AS PARHELIA OR SUN DOGS
BROOKLINE MASSACHUSETTS 1859 Very Good Manuscript 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall 
On offer is a fascinating, original manuscript relic of mid 19th Century meteorological occurrence of note being a handwritten eyewitness account of what the Harvard College Observatory, Annals, Vol. 19 described as a "Parhelia of the usual form, but of remarkable brilliance." The account which includes a pen and ink drawing signed A.S. describes the observation which occurred in Brookline Massachusetts on April 2, 1859. The notes in part: "About one fifth of the distance between the first circle and the Zenith was a faint hole with the sun in its centre without its points..." "Dr Kane speaks of seeing it on several occasions in the Arctic regions, and was apparently greatly impressed with its beauty." Stated "For the Transcript". 2 pages, 5" x 7.75". Tear left side, else VG. Pen and ink drawing, 7" x 8.5". Some ink smudging, else VG 
Price: 2055.99 USD
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2 A.W. KENNEDY 1849 - 1860 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT FINANCIAL DIARY AND INVESTOR'S LEDGER DETAILING THE HISTORY OF TWO SHIPS PLYING THEIR TRADE ON THE ATLANTIC
Plymouth Massachusetts MASS MA 1849 Good+ Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a super, original 1849 - 1860 financial and investment diary and ship owner's ledger handwritten by A.W. Kennedy one of many share owners and likely the 'Chief Operating Officer' in two stated ships; The "M.R.Ludwig" and the "Brig Darien". The many intimate details of the investors, costs related to ship building, supplies etc., are finely detailed and within the 136 pages a wealth of mid 19th century marine commerce is revealed. There are a few pieces of ephemera tucked in, one as early as 1821. The 13½ x 8½ inch folio sized book features a typed slip stating 'Plymouth Mass. Ship Log' pasted to the spine. 
Price: 2055.99 USD
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3 ABDIEL & JANE 1858 CHARMING EARLY PIONEER HANDWRITTEN AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM ILLINOIS
Giraed, Illinois 1858 Manuscript Very Good+ 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall Autograph
Superb early pre Civil War letter in lovely hand by ABDIEL & JANE - ALS, GIRAED, ILLINOIS, 1858, 4 full pages, 4to. Wonderful letter to cousin urging him to come west, buy a farm and be their neighbor. Super snapshot of early life and family warmth. Fine. 
Price: 359.99 USD
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4 ABEL BROWN 1813 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL OF LEGAL PROCEEDINGS, LETTERS TO THE GOVERNOR, PROTEST OF LAND TRANSFERS AND SCHOOL POLICIES OF EARLY NEW HAMPSHIRE
SOUTH HAMPTON SEABROOK NEW HAMPSHIRE 1813 Good English 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall 
On offer is a super manuscript relic of early 19th century New Hampshire government and judicial proceedings and some legislative acts and even a protest being the original manuscript daybook of Abel Brown of Southampton, New Hampshire. He identifies himself as a witness to proceeding and recorder of such. There are a number of signatures and initials of other witnesses, signers to Abel's writings etc. Handwritten notes dating from 1813 through 1824 over 24 pages of writings includes military matters, building roads, an apprenticeship agreement, a protest over land taken from the town of South-Hampton to the town of Seabrook, letters to the Governor and more. Handmade book with paper covers, 7" x 8", overall VG. 
Price: 985.99 USD
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5 ABRAHAM JOHN HILLSDON 1886 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT RELIC OF NORTH OXFORD COUNTY ONTARIO FINANCE AND COMMERCE HANDWRITTEN BY THE COUNTY TREASURER
NORTH OXFORD COUNTY ON EAST NISSOURI WOODSTOCK 1886 Fair+ 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is an interesting, original later 19th Century Municipal Record book from North Oxford, Ontario dated 1886-87. Titled: Township of North Oxford, Debenture Accounts, Henderson Creek Drain under By Law No. 176. 1886 & 1887. The treasurer is an Abraham John Hillsdon, and the accounts are written in his hand ~ lists of income received and expenditures for this Henderson Creek Drain project in 1887. There are 29 written pages, starting in 1887, with the last entry in 1895. They are sporadic in the book, some at the front, some in the middle, and some right at the end of the book with blank pages in between. There is a small glued in handwritten receipt: 'Received from Mr. Hillsdon Treasurer of North Oxford the Sum of Five dollars and Seventy three cents ~ East Nissouri Township's share of the refund on the Henderson Creek Drain" signed David Lawrence Treasurer East Nissori'. Many names in this book, a very interesting piece of south western Ontario history. The back of the book has several pages on the Gravel Account for 1894; Reports from Each Pathmaster of the Gravel Used in their Division; lists of names, numbers of loads and pit locations. There is also a copy of By-Law # 176 for the year 1886 inserted ~ By-Law to provide for draining of parts of the first, second and third concessions of the Township of North Oxford, and for borrowing, on the credit of the Municipality the sum of one thousand nine hundred and fifteen dollars for completing the same. Provisionally adopted the twentieth day of October, A.D. 1886. Also, there is a worn copy of the Seventh Annual Report for the Agricultural Mutual Assurance Association of Canada tucked in. The book itself is in fair shape having a cracked hinge, some loose pages and some chipping but overall Fair+. 
Price: 1255.99 USD
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6 ABRAHAM LINCOLN SECRETARY 1861 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LETTER WRITTEN ON STATIONARY ADDRESSED FROM THE "EXECUTIVE MANSION"
Washington DC 1861 Very Good Manuscript 16mo - over 5¾" - 6¾" tall 
On offer is a very mysterious, enigmatic, perhaps incomplete as it is an unsigned, letter dated July 12, 1861 from the Executive Mansion. As evidenced on the first page in the hand of an old archivist or perhaps auction house this letter is written "During Lincoln's administration the man writing this was Lincoln's Secretary." This would have been written within months of Lincoln taking the Presidential office and moving into the White House. Lincoln had several secretaries including Hay, Nicolay, Stoddard and others. This letter we safely assume must have been written by one of them. This is a 4 page letter begins with "My Dear Child" but the recipient is also unidentified. There is mention in the letter of Clara Matteson and a gentleman named Charlie. Research suggests that Ms. Matteson is the daughter of Joel A. Matteson was Governor of Illinois. The letter is a very personal missive with the writer alluding to an intimacy with recipient and that she has reacted badly to information from outside sources: My Dear Child: What shall I do with you? How long will it be before you learn to trust your best friends quietly and not torture yourself and them with all kinds of strange surmises and fancies! I wish you could understand once and for all that I am your friend and cannot by any human possibility be otherwise...When every pleasant day I have spent at home for many years has been made pleasant by you; when the only house, besides my mother's, where I felt that I was welcome, has been your mother's...As to Clara Matteson, I own to a little surprise. I like her very much. My acquaintance with her, though very slight, convinced me that she was of a sweet and amiable disposition. I have many times spoken about you to her. She has often expressed a desire to know you....But you say you have never seen Clara. I am not responsible for what Clara's dear friends, say, nor is she." Lastly is an after-thought note in the upper left corner of the first page reads: "If you gave Charlie ammunition to have hit ___ then you are the one to blame not P." VG. 
Price: 545.99 USD
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7 ADAMS FAMILY [?] 1863 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER DETAILING THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THIS 87 YEAR OLD MAN WHEN HE LIVED IN NEW YORK CITY IN 1791
Baltimore, Maryland MD 1863 Very Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a fascinating, historic, original manuscript letter written by an unknown elderly Baltimore man and likely a member of the Adams family and related to Thomas Boylston Adams (September 15, 1772 - March 13, 1832), the third and youngest son of John and Abigail (Smith) Adams in response to a request he write of his life and times in New York City. [The letter was part of a greater group from the Thomas Boylston Adams papers.] The writer relates what an active, involved and intelligent teenager and young man experienced in the heady historic days of New York City from 1791 to the turn of the Century. The author gives a real person's view of the French Revolution from the American perspective, the feeling of the 'street' to Jacobin views and much more of the politics of the era. The 87 year old man begins "You wish me to communicate for publication such facts and information in regard to Men and things in the City & State of New York, as I may, from my residence in that City have been connected with, or acquired a knowledge of, in the early period of my long life." It goes on, in part: "Having an ardent desire to see General Washington, I soon found my way to Cherry Steer and the Franklin House, near Pearl Street, where he resided..." "It was I think in 1793, or certainly soon after, that Francis who had been General Washington's Steward, established on or near the Battery his celebrated Ice Cream & Cake house, probably the first public house of its kind in the United States." "In his speech at the opening of Congress, 1795, the President, General Washington..[said] "Government founded upon the genuine principles of rational liberty and with mild and wholesome laws, was it too much to say that our Country exhibited a spectacle of National Happiness never surpassed, if ever before equalled." Dated Baltimore, March 1863, 15 pages on 15 leaves, recto side only, 8vo, 25 x 21 cm. VG. 
Price: 1855.99 USD
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8 ADMIRAL THOMAS COCHRANE, 10th EARL OF DUNDONALD, a.k.a. LE LOUP DES MERS [THE WOLF OF THE SEA] 1823 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY ONE OF ENGLAND'S GREATEST NAVAL HEROES - THE MODEL FOR HORATIO HORNBLOWER AND 'LUCKY' CAPTAIN JACK AUBREY BUT KNOWN TO THE FRENCH NAVY AS THE 'WOLF OF THE SEAS'
BRAZIL [?] 1823 Very Good Manuscript 32mo - over 4" - 5" tall 
On offer is a super, original 1823 manuscript letter handwritten by Admiral Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Marquess of Maranhão, GCB, ODM (Chile) (1775-1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831, was a senior British naval flag officer and radical politician. He was a daring and successful captain of the Napoleonic Wars, leading the French to nickname him 'Le Loup des Mers' ('The Sea Wolf' or 'The Wolf of the Seas'). Cochrane was the model for Patrick O'Brian's 'Master and Commander' Captain Jack Aubrey Series of books. He was also believed to be the model for Horatio Hornblower. Written in the third person, signed 'Tho. Cochrane', dated March 7th, 1823, the place hard to distinguish, this short letter is dated a mere two weeks before taking command of the Brazilian Navy, Cochrane writes regarding his compliments to Captain Porter, thanking him for furnishing information of Pirate activity, having not the means to pursue the pirates and his mention of English merchants in the port. This superb 2pp., 4.25" x 7" relic of British naval and marine history in the hand of one of the most exciting, successful and decorated men that ever captained a ship will be a treasure for the right collector. Signed in ink. Fine. BIO NOTES: Thomas Cochrane was born at Annsfield, near Hamilton, South Lanarkshire, Scotland, the son of Archibald Cochrane, 9th Earl of Dundonald and Anna Gilchrist. Cochrane joined the navy in 1793, and spent his first months at Sheerness in a Sixth-rate frigate, the 28-gun HMS Hind, commanded by his uncle, Captain Alexander Cochrane, then transferred to the 38-gun Fifth-rate HMS Thetis, also under his uncle's command. In Thetis he visited Norway then served on the North America station. There, in 1795, he was appointed acting lieutenant . The following year he was commissioned in the rank of lieutenant on 27 May 1796, after passing the examination. After several transfers in America and a return home, he found himself as 8th Lieutenant on Lord Keith's flagship HMS Barfleur in the Mediterranean Sea in 1798. In February 1800, Cochrane commanded the prize crew taking the captured French vessel Généreux to the British base at Mahón. The ship was almost lost in a storm, with Cochrane and his brother Archibald going aloft in place of a crew that were mostly ill. On 28 March 1800, Cochrane, having been promoted to commander, took command of the brig sloop HMS Speedy. Later that year, a Spanish warship disguised as a merchant ship almost captured him. He escaped by flying a Danish flag and fending off a boarding by claiming his ship was plague-ridden. Chased by an enemy frigate, and knowing it would follow him in the night by any glimmer of light from the Speedy, he placed a lantern on a barrel and let it float away. The enemy frigate followed the light and Speedy escaped. In February 1801, at Malta, he got into an argument with a French Royalist officer at a fancy dress ball. Cochrane came dressed as a common sailor, and the Royalist mistook him for one. This argument led to Cochrane's only duel. Cochrane wounded the French officer with a pistol shot but was himself unharmed. One of his most notable exploits was the capture of the Spanish xebec frigate El Gamo, on 6 May 1801. El Gamo carried 32 guns and 319 men, compared with Speedy's 14 guns and 54 men. Cochrane flew an American flag to approach so closely to El Gamo that its guns could not depress to fire on the Speedy's hull. This left the Spanish with no option but to board. However, whenever the Spanish were about to board, Cochrane would pull away briefly, and fire on the concentrated boarding parties with his ship's guns. Eventually, Cochrane boarded the Gamo, despite still being outnumbered about five to one, and captured her. In Speedy's 13-month cruise, Cochrane captured, burned, or drove ashore 53 ships before three French ships of the line under Admiral Charles-Alexandre Linois captured him on 3 July 1801. During his time as a prisoner Linois often asked him for advice and Cochrane later referred to how polite he was in his autobiography. A few days later he was exchanged for the second captain of another French ship. Then, on 8 August 1801, he received a promotion to the rank of post-captain. After the Peace of Amiens, Cochrane attended the University of Edinburgh. Upon the resumption of war in 1803, St Vincent assigned him in October 1803 to command of a Sixth Rate ship which was the 22-gun HMS Arab. Cochrane alleged that the ship had poor handling, colliding with Royal Navy ships on two occasions (the Bloodhound and the Abundance), and afforded Cochrane no opportunities. In his autobiography he would compare the Arab to a collier and his first thoughts on seeing Arab being repaired at Plymouth were that she would "sail like a haystack. Despite this, he still managed to intercept and board an American merchant ship, the Chatham, and create an international incident, leading to the consignment of HMS Arab and her commander to protect Britain's important whaling fleet beyond Orkney in the North Sea. In 1804, St Vincent stood aside for the incoming new government led by William Pitt the Younger and Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville took office. In December of that year Cochrane received an appointment to command of the new 32-gun frigate HMS Pallas, in which he undertook a series of notable exploits over the following eighteen months. In August 1806, he took command of the 38-gun frigate HMS Imperieuse, formerly the Spanish frigate Medea. One of his midshipmen was Frederick Marryat, who later wrote fictionalized accounts of his adventures with Cochrane. In Imperieuse Cochrane raided the Mediterranean coast of France. In 1808, Cochrane and a Spanish guerrilla force captured the fortress of Mongat, which sat astride the road between Gerona and Barcelona. This delayed General Duhesme's French army for a month. On another raid Cochrane copied code books from a signal station, leaving behind the originals so the French would believe them uncompromised. When Imperieuse ran short of water, she sailed up the estuary of the Rhone to replenish. When a French army marched into Catalonia and besieged Rosas, Cochrane took part in the defence of the town by occupying and defending Fort Trinidad ('Castell de la Trinitat') for a number of weeks before the fall of the city forced him to leave; Cochrane was one of the last two men to quit the fort. While captain of Speedy, Pallas, and Imperieuse, Cochrane became arguably the most effective practitioner of coastal warfare during the period. Not only did he attack shore installations such as the Martello tower at Son Bou on Minorca, but captured enemy ships in harbor by leading his men in boats in "cutting out" operations. He was a meticulous planner of every operation, which limited casualties among his men and maximized the chances of success. In 1809, he commanded the attack by a flotilla of fire ships on Rochefort, as part of the Battle of the Basque Roads. The attack did considerable damage, but Cochrane blamed Admiral Gambier, the fleet commander, for missing the opportunity to destroy the French fleet. In June 1806, Cochrane stood for the House of Commons on a ticket of parliamentary reform (a movement which would later bring about the Reform Acts) for the potwalloper borough of Honiton. This was exactly the kind of borough Cochrane wished to abolish; votes were mostly sold to the highest bidder. Cochrane offered nothing and lost the election. In October 1806, he again ran for Parliament in Honiton and won. Cochrane initially denied that he paid any bribes, but Cochrane himself revealed in a Parliamentary debate ten years afterward that he had paid ten guineas (£10 10s) per voter through Mr. Townshend, local headman and banker. In May 1807, Cochrane was elected by Westminster in a more democratic election. Cochrane campaigned for parliamentary reform, allied with such Radicals as William Cobbett, Sir Francis Burdett and Henry Hunt. His outspoken criticism of the conduct of the war and the corruption in the navy made him powerful enemies in the government. His criticism of Admiral Gambier's conduct at the Battle of the Basque Roads was so severe that Gambier demanded a court-martial to clear his name. This made Cochrane important enemies in the Admiralty. Cochrane, though popular with the public, was unable to get along with his colleagues in the House of Commons, let alone the government. Usually, he had little success in promoting his causes, though there were exceptions: in 1812 he successfully confronted the Admiralty's prize court. His conviction in the Great Stock Exchange Fraud of 1814, resulted in Parliament expelling him on 5 July 1814. However, his constituents in the seat of Westminster re-elected him at the resulting by-election on 16 July. He held this seat until 1818. In 1818, Cochrane last speech in Parliament advocated parliamentary reform. Cochrane left the UK in official disgrace, but that did not end his naval career. In May 1817, at the request of Chilean leader Bernardo O'Higgins, he took command of the Chilean Navy in Chile's war of independence against Spain. He was the first Vice Admiral of Chile and Commander-in-Chief of the Chilean Navy. Accompanied by Lady Cochrane and their two children, he reached Valparaiso on 28 November 1818. Named a vice admiral, Cochrane reorganized the Chilean navy, introducing British naval customs. He took command in the frigate O'Higgins and blockaded and raided the coasts of Peru as he had those of France and Spain. On his own initiative he organized and led the capture of Valdivia, despite only having 300 men and two ships to deploy against seven large forts. However, he failed in his attempt to capture the Chiloé Archipelago for Chile. In 1820, O'Higgins ordered him to convoy the Liberation Army of General Jose de San Martin to Peru, blockade the coast and support the campaign for independence. Later, forces under Cochrane's personal command cut out and captured the frigate Esmeralda, the most powerful Spanish ship in South America. All this led to Peruvian independence, which O'Higgins considered indispensable to Chile's independence and security. Cochrane's victories in the Pacific were spectacular and important but the euphoria was almost immediately marred by accusations that he had been plotted against by subordinates and treated with contempt and denied adequate financial reward by his superiors. It is clear from the evidence that none of these accusations is true and that the root of the problem lay in Cochrane's own suspicious and uneasy personality. Cochrane is alleged to have made plans to free Napoleon from his exile on Saint Helena and make him ruler of a unified South American state.[citation needed] Before he could carry out his plan, Napoleon died in 1821. Cochrane left the service of the Chilean Navy on 29 November 1822. Brazil was fighting its own war of independence against Portugal. Excepting Montevideo (in today Uruguay, then Cisplatina), along the 1822, the southern provinces fell under the control of the patriots led by the Prince Regent, later Emperor Pedro I, but Portugal still controlled some north important capitals, with major garrisons and naval bases like Belém do Pará, Salvador da Bahia and São Luís do Maranhão. Cochrane took command of the Brazilian Navy on 21 March 1823 and its flagship, the 'Pedro I'. He blockaded the Portuguese in Bahia, confronted them at the Battle of May 4, and forced them to evacuate the province in a vast convoy of ships which Cochrane's men attacked as they crossed the Atlantic. Cochrane then sailed to Maranhão (then called Maranham) on his own initiative and bluffed the garrison into surrender by claiming that a vast (and mythical) Brazilian fleet and army were over the horizon. He then sent a subordinate, Captain John Pascoe Grenfell, to Belem do Pará to use the same bluff and extract a Portuguese surrender. As a result of Cochrane's efforts, Brazil was now totally de facto independent and free from any Portuguese troops. On his return to Rio de Janeiro, the Emperor Pedro I of Brazil rewarded him by making him the Marquês do Maranhão (Marquis of Maranhão). Unfortunately, as in Chile, Cochrane's joy at these successes was rapidly replaced by quarrels over pay and prize money and a totally imaginary accusation that the Brazilian authorities were plotting against him. In mid- 1824, Cochrane sailed north with a squadron to assist the Brazilian army, under General Francisco Lima e Silva, suppress a republican rebellion in the state of Pernambuco which had begun to spread to Maranhão and other northern states. The rebellion was rapidly extinguished. Cochrane then proceeded to Maranhão where he took over the administration and demanded the payment of a vast sum of prize money which he claimed was owing to himself and the squadron as a result of the recapture of the province in 1823. He took all money from the public funds and sacked all merchant ships anchored in São Luís do Maranhão. Then, defying orders to return to Rio de Janeiro, Cochrane transferred to a captured Brazilian frigate, left Brazil on 10 November 1825 and returned to Britain. Cochrane then went to Europe, where between March 1827 and December 1828 he took an active role in the campaign to secure Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire, which had deployed an army raised in Egypt to suppress the Greek rebellion. Cochrane's efforts generally met with limited success due to the poor discipline of the Greek soldiers and seamen. Still, one of his subordinates, Captain Hastings, attacked Ottoman forces at the Gulf of Lepanto, which indirectly led to intervention by Great Britain, France and Russia, the destruction of the Turko-Egyptian fleet at the Battle of Navarino, and the end of the war under mediation of the Great Powers. Greece was probably the only campaign in Cochrane's naval career in which the results of his efforts were disappointingly slight. At the end of the war he resigned and returned to England. For the first time since he was convicted for the 1814 Stock Exchange Scandal his lively nature was brought to a standstill. Despite reports to the contrary, there is little evidence to suggest that he experienced a nervous breakdown. Cochrane inherited his peerage following his father's death on 1 July 1831, becoming the 10th Earl of Dundonald. He was restored to the Royal Navy list on 2 May 1832 as a Rear Admiral of the Blue, but Cochrane's return to Royal Navy service was delayed by his refusal to take a command until his knighthood had been restored. Nevertheless, he was further promoted up the list of flag officers, as follows: Rear Admiral of the Blue on 2 May 1832; Rear Admiral of the White on 10 January 1837; Rear Admiral of the Red on 28 June 1838; Vice Admiral of the Blue on 23 November 1841; Vice Admiral of the White on 9 November 1846; Vice Admiral of the Red on 3 January 1848; Admiral of the Blue on 21 March 1851; Admiral of the White on 2 April 1853 and Admiral of the Red on 8 December 1857. On 22 May 1847 Queen Victoria reinstated him as a knight in the Order of the Bath. He then served as Commander-in-Chief of the North America and West Indies Station from 1848 to 1851. During the Crimean War, the government considered him for a command in the Baltic, but decided that there was too high a chance that he would lose his fleet in a risky attack. On 6 November 1854, he was appointed to the honorary office of Rear-Admiral of the United Kingdom, an office that he would retain until his death. 
Price: 2285.99 USD
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9 ALONZO G. SHARP 1890 ORIGINAL 'PRESSED COPY' MANUSCRIPT LETTER WRITTEN BY FAMED POSTAL INSPECTOR ALONZO SHARP REQUESTING THAT THE STORIED POSTMASTER OF ATHENS GEORGIA BE FIRED
WASHINGTON [DC] 1890 Very Good Manuscript 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is a fascinating original, 'pressed copy*' U.S. Post Office department letter dated March 10, 1890. It is written to Chief Postal Inspector E.G. Rathbone by one of the U.S. Post Office's most renowned Postal Inspectors Alonzo G. Sharp. This letter is in reference to dismissing African-American Postmaster Monroe B. (Pink) Morton of Athens, Georgia for blowing the cover of undercover Postal Inspectors to other Postal Officials. (Postal Inspectors act as the Detectives and Police of the U.S. Post Office). Alonzo G. Sharp Ex-Mayor of Chattanooga, Tennessee, once issued City-Backed script in place of cash to the city's poor so that they could survive in a terrible economy. This act almost bankrupted the city. As a Postal Inspector for the Southern District, he captured many outlaws, crooks, forgers and swindlers who used the U.S. Mails as a vehicle for gaining wealth, including almost single-handedly bringing down the famous 'Louisiana Lottery'. He also played a major part in the capture of the 'Rube Burrow Gang'. The Rube Burrow Gang was a group of Train Robbers and Outlaws. They were second in notoriety only to the Jesse James Gang. Monroe Bowers (Pink) Morton, founder of the Morton Theatre, was born in Athens, Georgia in May 1853. "Pink," as he was known to family and friends, was the son of a white father and an African-American mother (Morton's mother was a slave). Although he had very little formal education, Morton was an ambitious man who worked at various occupations before eventually establishing himself as a building contractor. As a building contractor, Morton designed the Wilkes County (now Washington-Wilkes County) Courthouse. In addition to the courthouse, he participated in the construction of an Anniston, Alabama government building. Another well known fact was that Mr. Morton owned between twenty-five to thirty Athens area buildings, including a "$10,000 Marblestone building" on what was originally Clayton Street in downtown Athens. Morton was also the owner and publisher of the Progressive Era, the first African-American owned newspaper in Athens. The paper was established in 1914. In 1896, Morton was chosen as a state delegate to the Republican National Convention. While in attendance, he was appointed to the committee which informed William McKinley of his nomination as the Republican Party candidate for President of the United States. After McKinley's election victory, Morton was appointed as the United States Postmaster for Athens Georgia. He remained in this post for the next five years, garnering high praise from local citizens for his performance. In 1909, Morton began construction on the Morton building. It is alleged that the design specifications for the Morton Theatre were based on an architectural design from a Frank Cox of Chicago, Illinois, who had originally designed these plans for the nearby New Opera House. On May 18, 1910, the Morton building was completed. The building housed various business occupants, including the E.D. Harris Drug Store (Athens' first African-American owned drug store), Dr. Ida Johnson Hiram (the first state-licensed, African-American woman dentist) and the Morton Theatre, the first African-American built, owned and operated vaudeville theatre in America. "Pink" often acted as the Theatre's Lighting and/or Stage Director for some of the performances. As owner and operator of the building, he used the rent collected from its various business occupants to subsidize the operation of the Theatre. Monroe Bowers Morton died in 1919 at the age of 66. [*A 'Pressed Copy' was a system used in the pre-Carbon Paper Era. One would write the letter to be copied, and while the ink was still semi-dry, the letter would be placed along with a blank copy of moistened linen paper into a press. This action would make a perfect "Copy" of the original using the same ink transferred from the original letter.] 
Price: 1185.99 USD
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10 ALVIRA MERRIAM, Contractor for Keeping State Paupers 1851 HANDWRITTEN STAMPLESS COVER ALS TO THE SELECTMEN OF PLAINFIELD REGARDING SAMUEL HARVEY
North Granby Connecticut CT Plainfield CT 1851 Very Good 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall Autograph
Stampless cover from the Contractor for the care of paupers for the State of Connecticut, Alvira Merriam writes the Selectmen of Plainfield, Connecticut regarding an inhabitant, Samuel Harvey, and his status. Alvira takes a very imperious tone interestingly enough. Dated North Granby, August 14th, 1851. VG. 
Price: 339.99 USD
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11 AMANDA F. KELSEY 1846 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LETTER REGARDING THE SHIPWRECK OF THE SCHOONER LYDIA
Westbrook, Ct 1846 Manuscript Good+ 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall Autograph
1846 AMANDA F. KELSEY - ALS [STAMPLESS FOLDED LETTER], Westbrook, Ct., 1846, 3 pages, 4to, plus integral address leaf. Writing to her nephew about the family's concern that he was on board the Shipwreck of the Schooner Lydia. Ms. Kelsey writes of the many nights of missed sleep by her mother, sick with worry over the reports of the Lydia's sinking. Very touching description and familial connection. Manuscript PAID postal marking. Overall in good shape though a bit fragile and some creases to the folds in one or two spots but still quite legible. 
Price: 229.99 USD
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12 AMOS B. GEORGE 1862 - 1863 SMALL ARCHIVE OF ORIGINAL HANDWRITTEN CIVIL WAR LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A 48th REGIMENT MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEER
WENHAM MASSACHUSETTS MASS MA CAMP BANKS LOUISIANA 1862 Manuscript Very Good+ 16mo - over 5¾" - 6¾" tall 
On offer is a small archive of 3 manuscript letters handwritten by Amos B. George, Co. A 48th Regt. Mass. Volunteers, two written in 1862 from Camp Lander in Wenham, Mass. and one written in 1863 from Camp Banks, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 5 x 8 (folded sheets), 10 pages total; with two original transmittal envelopes (postal cancel/ stamp removed from one envelope), with fine Civil War era content: [10/8/1862] "... We have got our uniforms now so that we are all ready for visitors, and I want you to be sure and come... I hope that we shall come down to Newburyport as a company, before we go, but it depends greatly on the officers...," [11/19/1862] "... We are not sure of having a furlough, although we expect it and shall probably get it... I staid four days over my [last] furlough but on account of good behavior, and the fact of its being my first offence, I escaped without punishment...," [2/18/1863] "... After being on the water thirty seven days, our Regt. landed at Baton Rouge on Wednesday Feb. 4th, two weeks ago to-day, an marching through the city to our camp-ground, which is two miles out from the river, we pitched our shelter tents... We are camped on what was the battle ground of Baton Rouge, and we have drilled day after day on ground in which the rebels who fell in that battle are buried, and this forenoon our company marched over one of the mounds, little thinking, I suppose, of the hopes which are buried in that heap of earth. Well, the soldier's life is a careless one in many respects and it is well it is so... Our Brigade is commanded by Col. Chapin of the 116th N.Y. Regt. a three years Regt. He is acting Brig-Gen. Our Brigade is the 1st in Augurs Division and is composed of the 116th N.Y. 21st Maine and 48th Mass. Reg'ts... Our Reg't has not received a cent of pay yet, but we expect to be paid off soon. Milk here is 10 cts a pint, Mollasses ditto and Apples 6 or 8 cts apiece, so you see that we cant get these little things for nothing in this country..." Folds, two letters in ink and one in pencil, overall VG. 
Price: 685.99 USD
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13 ANNA M. GETHINGS 1874 ORIGINAL AUTOGRAPH AND MEMORY ALBUM FILLED WITH LOVE, ROMANCE AND YEARNING OF A YOUNG QUEBEC GIRL
Quebec, Canada 1874 Fair+ 7 x 4.25 OBLONG Autograph
On offer is the original 1874-75 autograph, poetry and memory album of a 13 year old Quebec girl "Anna Gethings / Quebec / '74" as stated on the inside front cover. In all there are about 27 pages with manuscript writing, most filled in completely. Most of the writing is romantic poetry: love, kissing, constancy, autumn, love, yearning and more kissing. The poetry is most likely hand copied from other books but collectors and historians of the era will nonetheless appreciate what was in the heart of this young French-Canadian girl of 1874. Here are some snippets: "The double Pain / My heart doth own a double fear, / A double pain, a double sigh; / The one when you are absent, dear / The other when you're by..." "An Autumn Memory / I love to dream again, when Autumn dresses / All the foliage in purple, brown, and gold / Of those merry laughing eyes and golden tresses, / That were mine, all mine, in happy days of old..." "When the kiss which thou / gavest so frankly to me / Was yet warm on the lips / where its birth had been fated..." "Love's Good Night / The hour is growing late, love, / The moon is out of sight; / Perhaps, my dear, I'd better go; / And so, good night, good night..." Most appear to be in Anna's hand though there are a few inscriptions to this girl, one such: "LOUIS BRUNEAU / Quebec / 1st July 1874 / Cakes & Wine". There are five pages that have color illustrations pasted on to them. The covers are worn through at the corners and spine ends; binding is shaky; the first page (with a pasted on picture and no writing) has a 2" closed tear, a stiff crease, and edge chipping; the hinges are split at several places but the pages are holding; there are a few stains and finger marks; the writing is very clear and fully legible throughout. Overall Fair+. 
Price: 855.99 USD
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14 ANNIE OAKES HUNTINGTON 1887 - 1905 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT JOURNAL AND SCRAPBOOK OF A FUTURE AUTHOR, POET AND LESBIAN LOVER OF JEANETTE PAYSON
JAMAICA PLAINS HONG KONG BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS MA 1887 Good Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is a simply fascinating original 1887 - 1905 manuscript journal and scrapbook of the young Annie Oakes Huntington. Annie has an absolutely amazing history especially given the era: Huntington was born in Jamaica Plains, Massachusetts in 1875. She was from the famed Boston Quincy family on her mother's side (Elizabeth Quincy Huntington), and her father, Elijah Hunt Mills Huntington, was a grandson of Senator Mills of Massachusetts. Huntington had an ambitious and seemingly happy childhood, a sick young adulthood, and then a few happy decades in a farmhouse with the woman she loved, Jeanette Payson [the famed American landscape architect]. Huntington [a botanist with an expertise in trees] grew up writing and publishing [in 1947 a book, A Testament of Happiness, Letters of Annie Oakes Huntington, was published] and this journal is, among many things, a testament to her literary prowess. Intriguingly the book is titled in a very strong hand 'Annie O. Huntington. Her book. Containing some private writings that are only of interest to her.' Below this is a frail and much weakened hand: 'People reading it therefore will please bear this in mind. AOH.' The journal contains meticulous lists: books read (quite sophisticated) and Huntington's thoughts about the books. She was a fan of Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Sarah Orne Jewett and many other noted authors. There are a few pages related to palmistry. Pages of heraldic symbols, prizes received, and much more. Adding more depth are numerous ephemeral pieces tipped or tucked in including photos and materials from Hong Kong. There are Valentine poems; and original poems and sonnets Huntington wrote to a few girls. There are pages listing what she received for Christmas and the presents she gave to her loved ones. Her Father gave her a knife, later on she gets a new blade for it, also, a hatchet comes her way and is duly noted. She tallies up her earnings, first as a tutor and for early stories and articles. Later on (1900-1905), Huntington became ill and depressed for awhile, but she tallies up the earnings from her book - Studies of Trees in Winter (1901), then begins landscape gardening when feeling better. The large 13 x 9 inch journal is has 80 pages or so of handwritten notations of one sort or another. Binding is quite worn with half of spine strip missing and boards rubbed and cracked. Overall, the handwriting is quite easy read throughout. Overall G. 
Price: 3255.99 USD
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15 ANTHONY BUTLER 1839 HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPT LETTER BY A ROGUE, SCAMP AND HERO OF THE SINKING OF THE STEAMBOAT ANTHONY WAYNE
NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA LA 1839 Good English 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall 
On offer is an original handwritten autograph letter, ALS, by Anthony Butler (1787?-1849?) lawyer, soldier, politician and rogue. This is a stampless cover, no postal marks dated New Orleans, 1839, 1p, 7-3/4 x 12-1/2 in. To Lewis Daniell at New Orleans. Penned above the letter is a signed promissory note promising to pay Daniell $1060. The letter that follows illuminates the scheming nature of the man: "If you could only find it convenient to receive Land in payment. I would give a Tract that in a very short time would be worth Twenty thousand dollars, and as one only makes money for his children it seems to me that you could not make so good a bargain with a view to their future interest by any other mode...In the meantime all the money necessary for completing your surveys in Texas shall be paid as in part of the sum due you..." Signed A.Butler. Generally in very good condition save for starting to separate at the folds. Butler was born in South Carolina, probably in 1787 in Clarendon County, and established a sizable plantation in Russellville, Kentucky. At the outbreak of the War of 1812 he was commissioned a lieutenant colonel of the Twenty-eighth United States Infantry, on March 11, 1813. On February 21, 1814, he was promoted to colonel of the Second Rifle Regiment. After discharge he served as a member of the Kentucky legislature for two terms, 1818-19, but failed in a run for governor of that state in 1820. Butler was a resident of Mississippi in 1829 when his friend President Andrew Jackson, appointed him to succeed Joel Poinsett as United States chargé d'affaires in Mexico City. Historian Justin H. Smith commented that Butler's only qualifications for the post "were an acquaintance with Texas and a strong desire to see the United States obtain it." He had been through bankruptcy more than once, spoke no Spanish, was ignorant of the forms of diplomacy, and "was personally a bully and a swashbuckler." Further, Smith maintained, Butler was "shamefully careless," unprincipled in his methods, and "openly scandalous in his conduct...In brief, he was a national disgrace." Sam Houston wrote of Butler in 1832, "Such men as he is, would destroy a country, but take my word for it, he will never gain one!" Butler was recalled to Washington early in January 1836 but remained in Mexico on his own authority and continued to report to Jackson on the actions and intentions of the Mexican government toward Texas. He at last returned to the United States in May 1836. He then took residence in Washington County, Texas, and in September 1838 was elected to the House of Representatives of the Third Texas Legislature. At the outbreak of the Mexican War he offered his services to Gen. Zachary Taylor, believing that his knowledge of the country would be useful. Butler moved to the North in 1847 or 1848. As a Mason he was grand master of Kentucky in 1812-13 and of Texas in 1840-41. In 1849 or 1850 he died on the Mississippi River attempting to save his fellow passengers from the burning wreck of the steamboat Anthony Wayne. His papers are preserved at the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin 
Price: 655.99 USD
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16 ANTI-WAR COMMUNE SUPERB COMMUNE POSTER 1870-1871 FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR POSTER CALLING FOR 'L'HUMANITE'
France 1871 Manuscript Very Good 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall Autograph
Incredible, anti-patriotic French document calling for an end to violence and calling for "L'Humanite". France was considered by most Prussians as being very aggressive regarding the loose coalition of states prior to the formation of the German Empire. The conflict led to the end of the Nalpoleonic era and to France becoming the only republican great power. The document is headed - TUER EST TOUJOURS UN CRIME! - To Kill is Always A Crime. 
Price: 149.99 USD
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1858 - 1876 ORIGINAL GROUP OF 17 MANUSCRIPT LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A NORTH CAROLINA MAN NOW LIVING IN ALABAMA DETAILING TO HIS SISTERS AND BROTHER ALL ABOUT HIS LIFE IN THE DEEP SOUTH BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE CIVIL WAR, ARCHIBALD [ARCHIE] M. MCLAUCHLIN
17 ARCHIBALD [ARCHIE] M. MCLAUCHLIN 1858 - 1876 ORIGINAL GROUP OF 17 MANUSCRIPT LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A NORTH CAROLINA MAN NOW LIVING IN ALABAMA DETAILING TO HIS SISTERS AND BROTHER ALL ABOUT HIS LIFE IN THE DEEP SOUTH BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE CIVIL WAR
LOWER PEACH TREE WILCOX COUNTY ALABAMA LOWNDES ASH 1858 Very Good Manuscript 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 
On offer is a super, original archive of 17 manuscript letters handwritten by teacher and 'farmer', though gardener would be more apt in the early years, Archibald M. McLauchlin, originally of North Carolina, writing from a number of locales over the years all in Alabama, who maintains a correspondence with family back home; sisters Mary and Sarah and brother Neill. [While there are no covers we know the family live in North Carolina.] Archie as he often signs himself writes between 1858 and 1876 mostly from Lower Peach Tree Alabama [13: 1859, 1860 (3), 1866, 1867, 1869 (2), 1870, 1873, 1872, 1875, 1876], Eufaula Barbour County [1: 1858], Lowndes County Alabama [1: 1859] and Ashe (sometimes Ash) Creek Alabama [2: 1858, 1859]. This fascinating group of historical letters is richly filled with details of Archie's life and times in the Deep South and all the more interesting as they span the pre Civil War era with the post Civil War era. The letters are very detailed newsy 'catch up' letters though there are a couple of dominant threads in each one. Here are some snippets: May 7th 1859 Ashe Creek. 6 pgs. Much to do about crops, gardens and living off the land. He begins: 'Dear Sister Why comes no letter from home? Why stays so long the messenger of glad tidings? It is now more than a month since Sarah's letter came to hand, more than a month since I wrote to Sarah sending a specimen of our vegetation, a month and a half since I wrote to Pa. Were these letters received?" From there he discusses different vegetables farmed by various friends and himself, the state of his students four of whom he expects to go to college, one for Oglethorpe, three for Marion Alabama [likely the Marion Military Institute], reports on the healthy qualities of Lower Peach Tree which was of great concern to him until he was given information from a dependable source, his traveling from 'North Carolina not minding the chills but the fever'. Sept 5th 1859 Lower Peach Tree Wilcox County Alabama. 4 pages. Beginning Dear Sister Mary he tells much of his move from Lowndes to Lower Peach Tree especially the level of his surprise at his regret leaving all the people he got to know there. In his return to the area he once taught he makes mention of his times in the Baptist Church. He goes into great detail on how his entrance and acceptance in a new Church felt and how he was treated. The entire very well filled letter centers on life in Lower Peach Tree. December 26th 1866 Lower Peach Tree. Written over a period of a week or so Archie writes a super, historically significant content filled 4 page letter which goes a long way to reveal some of the difficulties in the 'new reality' of post Civil War Alabama and the South. He begins with serious concerns: 'Sarah I received a letter from you about a month ago. I am sorry to hear you are not getting along well with the freemen. I hardly know what to advise. It is a hard matter to get along with the rascals anywhere at any time. I am bothered with some of them here. Rose took a notion to leave last Friday night. By doing so she has forfeited her years wages. I had paid her part but not much. I shall not pay her anymore til she gives full satisfaction. I would make her stay here next year but she has got to having babies too fast. She will have another in about four or five months….Kate [his wife] had another attack of the fever about a week after she [a new daughter] was born. She has been having periodic returns of the fever ever since I came back home. It has been very much against her and the baby to have fever.' He goes on to discuss the year past from a personal perspective of getting married and having a child but also the past relations with his family. The letters vary in size from 9 x 7 inches to 4 x 6 inches. Overall VG. 
Price: 4255.99 USD
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18 ASHBEL STEELE 1840 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG EPISCOPAL MISSIONARY TO LAFAYETTE INDIANA WRITING TO HIS WIFE
LAFAYETTE INDIANA IN 1840 Good Manuscript 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall 
On offer is a great, original stampless/folded autographed letter [ALS] handwritten by Ashbel Steele an early Episcopal minister and missionary to Indiana. Dated July 9, 1840 Lafayette, Indiana and sent to his wife Clarissa Steele in New Albany, Indiana. In this letter, he describes his stage coach journey from New Albany via Terre Haute - having just arrived in Lafayette. The Bishop of their church is also in Lafayette on a trip and soon heading to Chicago. Ashbel is contemplating a trip to the Chicago area to visit relatives. The postmark is a red Lafayette, Ia (Indiana, not Iowa) CDS with a black 18 3/4 cents manuscript rate mark. Overall VG. 
Price: 985.99 USD
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19 B.E. BONEY 1842 HANDWRITTEN RECEIPT FOR HAVING RECEIVED HIS ARTIFICIAL LEG
CINCINNATI [CINCINATTA] OHIO 1842 Very Good 32mo - over 4" - 5" tall 
On offer is an original 1842 handwritten receipt wherein B.E. Boney writes that he has received his artificial leg as per agreed terms from John Shaw of Cincinatta [Cincinnati Ohio]. 8 x 4 in. VG+ 
Price: 249.99 USD
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20 B.F. CARR [?] 1894 - 1900 ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT ACCOUNT BOOK AND FINANCIAL DIARY OF THE SECRET FRATERNAL ORDER OF THE ANCIENT ORDER OF THE MYSTIC CHAIN [AOKMC]
READING DARBY PENNSYLVANIA PA 1894 Good Manuscript Folio - over 12" - 15" tall 
On offer is an original 1894 - 1900 Pennsylvania manuscript account book and financial diary of the secret fraternal order out of The Ancient Order of Knights of the Mystic Chain [AOKMC]. This unique book details six years of historical and important data of the Pennsylvania unit of the group. [While there are no specific indicators of ultimate ownership or responsibility for compiling the records a number of personal pieces of ephemera indicate a B.F. Carr as, at least, one of the main holders of the book.] This secret fraternal organization was founded in 1870s, in the traditions of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Amongst the founders were Freemasons and Knights of Pythias. Some of the characteristics of this order can be traced to these two groups. This AOKMC was founded in Reading, Pennsylvania in 1870, and all of the members' addresses that are written on the last few pages of this journal [home town and state], are all from PA. This fraternal group, though quite popular in 19th Century Pennsylvania did not make much headway outside of Pennsylvania, and at its peak in membership, quite possibly numbered 35,000 - 40,000 members. It did not survive the depression years and seems to have completely disappeared in the early 20th century. The Knights of the Mystic Chain had three degrees: Knighthood, Mystery and Chivalry. The central point of a Castle [lodge] was an altar, upon which was an open Bible. The initiation rituals are far less serious. In the first degree the candidate is placed on a metal plate and instructed to take an object out of a bowl of water. At that time an electric shock is put through the candidate. In another degree the blindfolded candidate is ordered to bow deep until their heads dip in cold water. Members are urged in the rituals to make a fool of the candidates. All for the fun of the members. After several years a fourth degree was added, the Mark-degree. This degree was only open to past masters of Castles. There was also a separate paramilitary uniform-rank and a degree for women: Naomi or the Daughters of Ruth. In 1889 the order started to work in insurance, and pay out sick and death benefits, however it never grew larger. It disappeared in the first half of the 20th century. Both the Ancient Order Knights of the Mystic Chain and the Supreme Lodge of the Mystic Chain are long since defunct. The National Fraternal Congress of America's listing of name and status changes of fraternal benefit societies does not mention either of them. Are there any remaining chapters, and did it ever get out of PA? This mystery may have to remain unsolved. However, "In early 2006, the Phoenix masonry site received an email from an AOKMC member informing us that there was one lodge remaining, Castle #23 in Vera Cruz, Pennsylvania. It is not known if this Castle is still active." This significant, handwritten manuscript has over 200 pages of entries, names, dates, expenses. Members names included are: Clayton Augustine, Emmanuel Fry, Edward Fitzkee, Abraham Kays, Martin Kaugh, Edward Liebhard, Moses Knisely, Amos Leber, Sterling D. Mitzel, Jonathan McGuigan, Erwin E. Poff, Francis Reiginger, Jacob Shindler, Isaac Ruby, Francis Sprehkle, Pius Wolf, Milton Wallick, John Flory, Milton Breneman, Charles W. Detioiler, A. M. Schrantz, R. K. Emenhiser, D. E. Shortledge, Samuel W. Heaugh, Samuel W. Siple, R. E. Olerriler, Paul Krafs, Joseph D. Dellinger, Leander Horn, H. L. Doll, etc., to include several members who died and received death benefits. Expenses accounted for include: Initiation, Weekly Dues, Monthly Dues, Insurance Payments, Sick and Death Benefits, Officers Salary, State Tax, Fire Tax, Books and Postage, Representatives Expenses, Statements, Per Capita Tax, Merchandise, New Flag, Payment on Loan, Hall Rent, Weekly Dues, Pay the Janitor, Grave Digging, Pay Nurse, Expenses for Regalia, Benefits Paid Out, Insurance Tax, etc. Death benefits in the amount of $100 were paid out to several members who are listed under "Deaths," and $40 were paid out to the wives. One member who died did not get any death benefits as he "was in arrears on his dues." Condition: The handwritten entries are as neat, clean, and precise as the day they were entered on the pages of this 19th century journal which measures approx. 9 x 14 inches, and weighs approximately 7-8 pounds when wrapped. Internally this handwritten book is in very good condition, externally, it is not very attractive. The covers are worn, rubbed, and chipped [please see images], the outside cover of the spine has worn, yet book is holding together tightly. Tucked away inside the pages of this volume are numerous pieces of ephemera to include: bills of sale, handwritten letters, Veterans administration paper work, photographs etc., dating into 1950, tucked away apparently for safe keeping. Based on our research of fraternal organizations this is the only ledger we were able to ascertain was actually from the history of The Ancient Order Of The Knights Of The Mystic Chain. Overall G. NOTE: EXTRA SHIPPING DUE TO SIZE AND WEIGHT. 
Price: 3255.99 USD
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