1896 ORIGINAL INFORMAL MANUSCRIPT LOG OF A VOYAGE FROM NEW BRUNSWICK TO LIVERPOOL HAND WRITTEN BY A KNOWLEDGEABLE SHIP SAVVY PASSENGER

By: UNKNOWN

Price: $1,855.99

Quantity: 1 available


On offer is a unique and valuable informal log of a sailing ship from the age of the great clipper ships. This small paperback volume measures 8 inches by 5.25 inches. It contains 84 pages and is 65% complete. The body of the journal has separated from the cover but both are none-the-less in good condition. The handwriting is clear and legible. Siddartha is a commercial sailing ship sailing between Cape Tormentine, New Brunswick Canada and Manchester UK. She departs August 19th, 1896 and the journal ends on September 12th, 1896 while she is still at sea. Siddartha is a barque which means she carries three or more masts. The sails are square rigged except for the aft-most or mizzen mast which is rigged fore and aft. Ships rigged in this manner required less crew and were generally faster than schooners and similar fully square-rigged vessels. The author is unknown. However, context suggests that he is a passenger as both 1st and 2nd mates are referred to and crew would not have this leisure time. He seems well-acquainted with the Captain. Unlike a ship's officer, he does not stand regular watches and spends much time either drawing or working on a ship model. However, the author displays a comfortable familiarity with sailing and sailing ships. He is obviously literate and his writing is very good. The journal details a passage made by Siddartha between Canada and the UK. Casual research has not turned up much information on the vessel. The earliest reference to her indicates that she was in service at least as early as 1882. The last mention of her notes that she was abandoned off the Azores in 1899 and was reported as a floating derelict. The journal gives an excellent account of life on a commercial sailing ship.: "Sailed Wednesday AM Aug 19/96. Towed out by the tug William Aitken of Charlottetown (?). Breeze light. After casting off from tug, set all sail and steered a straight-course for Pictou Isld. Light shower about 11 A.M. Dinner. Breakfast. Went on deck found sun shining brightly and the ship sailing along with all sail set before a stiff breeze from the North[ ]. Rolling slightly. Sighted Cape George about 8:00. The wind being smooth, the Captain decided to run through the Straits of Canso. Ships course has been changed and we are heading a little to the east of Cape George. Sighted the Cape Breton shore about 9:00. Passed a steamer steering a course for the Island, probably for Charlottetown from Halifax. Could not make out her name. Talk with the Captain. He says that late last night after I left the deck that the wind again failed and we dropped away under the Amet Island ..." [Aug 20] "Lat 40.10 Long 57.27 Course S(outh) by S(outh) Distance Run 140 miles" [Aug 22]. He notes passing fishing boats: "... 2nd Mate Kelly says we passed through a fleet of 14 fishing schooners last night. This morning there are 10 or 12 in sight and we can see the men out in their dory's fishing their trawls. The 1st Mate Mr. Hair rigged up a line and caught 2 nice sized cod fish ... "[Aug 23]. Throughout their crossing, he notes other ships that come within view including a small schooner, a four-masted passenger liner and a Norwegian ship named 'Neptun'. As they approach the English Channel, traffic picks up and he notes many other vessels - 19 in one day. As they pass the Skerries, they pick up their pilot for the run to Liverpool. The voyage ends at the canal docks in Liverpool as the authors is preparing to take a canal boat to Manchester. This is an excellent example of a routine passage for a sailing ship across the Atlantic. A naval historian would find confirmation of the many details in the day-to-day operations of a large civilian passenger ship. A writer interested in this naval time period would find the daily routines rich in detail. From changing weather patterns to repairs made underway, the notes are a quiet, understated depiction of life on board.

Title: 1896 ORIGINAL INFORMAL MANUSCRIPT LOG OF A VOYAGE FROM NEW BRUNSWICK TO LIVERPOOL HAND WRITTEN BY A KNOWLEDGEABLE SHIP SAVVY PASSENGER

Author Name: UNKNOWN

Illustrator: /

Categories: 19th Century Manuscript, Books and Manuscripts General Overview, 19th Century Diary,

Publisher: NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA, 1896

Book Condition: Good

Type: Manuscript

Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall

Seller ID: 0008072

Keywords: KEYWORDS: HISTORY OF, SIDDARTHA; BARQUE; SAILING VESSELS OF THE 19TH CENTURY; OCEAN GOING TRADE COMMERCE, MARINE, NAUTICAL, ATLANTIC OCEAN, GRAND BANKS; CAPE GEORGE, CAPE TORMENTINE, NEW BRUNSWICK CANADA, NOVA SCOTIA, STRAITS OF CANSO, LIVERPOOL UK, ENGLAND, BARQUES, OCEAN TRAVEL, SEA VOYAGES, NAVAL HISTORY, SAILS, SAILBOATS, BOAT, CANADIANA, HANDWRITTEN, MANUSCRIPT, DOCUMENT, LETTER, AUTOGRAPH, WRITER, HAND WRITTEN, DOCUMENTS, SIGNED, LETTERS, MANUSCRIPTS, DIARY, DIARIES, JOURNALS, PERSONAL HISTORY, SOCIAL HISTORY, HISTORICAL, HOLOGRAPH, WRITERS, AUTOGRAPHS, PERSONAL, MEMOIR, MEMORIAL, ANTIQUITÉ, CONTRAT, VÉLIN, DOCUMENT, MANUSCRIT, PAPIER ANTIKE, BRIEF, PERGAMENT, DOKUMENT, MANUSKRIPT, PAPIER OGGETTO D'ANTIQUARIATO, ATTO, VELINA, DOCUMENTO, MANOSCRITTO, CARTA ANTIGÜEDAD, HECHO, VITELA, DOCUMENTO, MANUSCRITO, PAPEL