1918 SUPER, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG TEENAGER, SON OF A WEALTHY INDUSTRIALIST, ATTENDING THE GEORGIA MILITARY ACADEMY AS HE PREPARES TO GO TO WAR

By: THOMAS J. CRAVEN

Price: $3,455.99

Quantity: 1 available


On offer is an interesting diary of a cadet attending a military academy during the First World War. Measuring 4.5 inches by 3 inches, the diary contains 365 pages plus memoranda. It is approximately 50% complete. The cover is intact but the binding shows wear. There is 1 loose page but otherwise all are intact. The diary belongs to Thomas J. Craven. At the time of writing, Craven is 16 years old. Craven was the son of David and Annette Craven. He has two siblings; D. Steward Jr. and Anne. Craven married Josephine Russell Wales in 1930 and it lists him as living in Delaware at the time of the marriage. His father was a glass manufacturer along with other members of the family. In fact, they were one of the oldest glass manufacturers in the United States. The company opened in 1863 as Hall, Pancoast and Craven. The Craven brothers purchased all of the shares in 1885 and the name changed to Craven Brother's. At some point, they sold the firm and it was renamed Salem Glass Works. It subsequently changed hands (and name) again before being purchased in 2013 by Ardagh Glass, one of the largest such firms in the world. In 2015, Ardagh closed the plant, ending a glass making tradition in Salem NJ that went back to the 1700's. The Cravens were a prominent and wealthy family in New Jersey. A hint of that can be seen on the diary identification page where he notes the make of his automobile as a Cadillac - a car most 16 yearolds would not be driving. In 1918, Craven is a student at the Georgia Military College. Georgia Military College was established in 1879 as a military-focused middle and secondary school institution. It continues as such today. There is a swaggering air about him and he enjoys an active social life. This certainly comes through in his entries: "Went to Bab's to a dance last night and had an awfully dull time. None of the fellows would dance. Took Martha to the pictures in the afternoon and it was some Vaudeville that they had too. At night I went to Delworth's to supper and then took Martha and Betty to the dance at Dr. Hirse's. We also had a very dull time here. Edith Owens certainly gave me a lot of compliments" [Jan 1]; "Left in Mr. Carpenter's car and caught the 12:20 out of Phila. Caught the 7:30 S. A. L. out of Wash. Drove around Wash. and took a few pictures. There wasn't any good light. Have met up with a fellow from the V.G. Pretty bum too. There is a car in the rear filled with prisoners and guards for each" [Jan 5]; "Nothing but sit around today. There are 2 cars of corpses in the front of the train and 2 prisoners in the cars. Playing cards all day."[Jan 6]; "Stayed at the Terrace all night. Came out to this God forsaken place after breakfast. Saw Col. but mother don't like him very much, his is so far away, won't answer any questions directly. Took my girl to the criterion in the afternoon. It was fine. But I am getting tired of her. She was very affectionate as usual tho and I ought not to complain. Took supper at Louise's and left my dear mother at 8:30. She left for Sav. At 10…" [Feb 4]; "Inspection. Atlanta. Appointed Corporal and assigned to the 1st Squad Co. A. Sure got a lot of B. B.'s and paid for it but will stick to it" [Mar 11]; "That Roe isn't a bit appreciative. He sat up with that damned Glen tonight and ragged me for about an hour. These hell cats around here don't show any appreciation at all. Roe also ragged me at Stringfellow's Sunday about the fraternity that I wanted to join. I am rooming in another room now with Geothe. He is a hell of a shit. I wish to hell that I was home where I could eat." [Mar 19]; "Full dress parade and escort of the colors. Lieut. Clayton is in charge now (shipped from West Point and G. M. A. too). He is getting "hard" is all of the time wanting us to salute him. The parade was in full dress coats and white duck pants and it was very nice looking. M. Wilson has an album of snap shots. I think I will start one. Fatty Henderson asked me to Miami this summer. Received a fine letter from Grandfather Cann" [May 2]; "I went to the Park for the mail, without being authorized and tonight Col. informed me that I was under arrest until my orders were read out to reduce me to ranks. However I think that I shall see Col. Woodward and try to make him beat me or give me demerits or anything but "bust" me. I would certainly hate to take that news home to my parents. We had a game with Boy's High and won 10-0. We hired a goat and painted B. H. S. on it and had a parade at the park." [May 10]; "Owen's gave me a farewell dance at the club. ROTTEN TIME" [June 15]. His second last entry has him back home with his grandfather, enjoying the family's business success: "Went out to look over the plant. It is not very large but empty. 1700 men and is well equipped. Granddad left for Washington and I basked around in the car. ..." [June 19]. For a social historian, this is a very good glimpse into the world of privileged American youth at the end of WWI. It not only paints a picture of their daily life but also gives an insight into the attitudes that shape them.

Title: 1918 SUPER, ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG TEENAGER, SON OF A WEALTHY INDUSTRIALIST, ATTENDING THE GEORGIA MILITARY ACADEMY AS HE PREPARES TO GO TO WAR

Author Name: THOMAS J. CRAVEN

Categories: 20th Century Diary, 20th Century Manuscript, Books and Manuscripts General Overview,

Publisher: MILLEDGEVILLE, GEORGIA, 1918

Book Condition: Good

Type: Manuscript

Size: 32mo - over 4" - 5" tall

Seller ID: 0008199

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