1974 - 1979 ORIGINAL UNIQUE DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG FEMALE CRIMINAL, DETAILING THE HARDSHIPS, ROMANCES, AND UNCERTAINTIES OF PRISON, AND THE STRANGENESS OF ADJUSTING BACK TO LIFE AFTER JAIL

By: LINDA M. GOUDEAU

Price: $3,355.99

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Good


On offer is a truly unique diary, of one woman’s life of crime in Alaska, her time running away from law enforcement, her two year journey through the prison system, and the difficulties of life after confinement. The diary begins shortly after the events that would land the author, a young woman (possibly age 25) named Linda M. Goudeau, in jail. The first page states, “In this book I hope to change, to grow, to live, to love, to be wise enough not to hurt people. God help me, and give me strength to do the things I know I must. I love life, and hate myself. WHY?” The entries begin in October 30th, 1974 in Anchorage, Alaska. The first dozen or so pages do not mention the robbery or the warrant out for her arrest. They deal almost exclusively with Linda’s emotions at the time, which are predominantly ones of depression and sadness, and a desire to leave her past behind and start anew. “Saturday - Nov. 29 - 74. Another day. Ho-hum. 3 days depressed...I’m happy here. Just so alone - It sounds like I’m feeling sorry for myself. Maybe I am. I just think it's because I really have no set goals. No ties. Tomorrow is a new day with new ideas. And things that make me happy today probably won’t be what makes me happy tomorrow.” There is a gap of one month, and now Linda writes from New Orleans, Louisiana, “Today is Sunday, December 29. 1974. I haven’t written in this book in a month. A Lot of things have changed. For one thing I am in New Orleans. I arrived on Wednesday, Dec. 18. Took a cab to my Father’s house where I visited for a while. From there I went to La Place with my mother and stepfather. All was beautiful...I saw a man on the sidewalk and my dream of spending Xmas at home ended. He identified himself as F.B.I. and we went in where about 10 others were waiting with a warrant for my arrest. The charge. Bank robbery. The look on mom’s face nearly killed me. Never have I seen her so hurt. I would rather spent 10 years in jail then to put her through that day. From there they took me to where I am now...New Orleans Jail. After being booked and fingerprinted and taken to court, where I found I had a $40,000 bond on me I arrived on the 10th floor - House of Detention.” Linda was arrested for her role in robbing the Eagle River branch of the First National Bank of Anchorage of $42,000, the second largest robbery in the history of Alaska at the time. Her first few days in prison are a mixed bag. She writes she spends much of the first few days in isolation, “for throwing oatmeal on an inmate.” A few days later, however, there is a Christmas party, that “was a gass. 2 cops came up and smuggled in some scotch. About 2 shots for me. Well not bad.” She writes that she starts reading the bible, and that her parents visit. Her description of meeting her parents is heartbreaking and very well written. She writes of her life in prison: “loud, funny, sad...you learn strange things...you hold strange things precious to you...” She is soon moved to the California Institution for Women in Chino, California. The diary contains entries throughout Linda’s entire prison sentence, a total of 610 days all together. The entries from prison are a mix of observations and events of prison life, letters received and sent, news from back home and from the other conspirators in the bank robbery, and meditations of life and being, often beautifully and poetically written. There are also intense events, such as a riot in the prison in December, 1975. A prisoner started a fire in their bunk and all the women in the prison come out to see it, eventually banding together to break into different off-limits rooms, such as the canteen and the med room: “The excitement was beautiful - after 3 goodby’s with spot light helicopters hovering overhead - we finally went on our ways - Tear gas exploded 30 feet away behind me - But i could care less...The crowd at VC now and on their way to the canteen...We tied a fire hose to pump and took it off the truck as all laughed at the frightened pigs facing their first riot at CIW.” The whole event is an exhilarating read. She also starts a relationships with women in the prison, first Trisha, then Colette with whom Linda falls in love with: “Feb. 27, 1976. Colette you make me feel as tho I’ve never known love before - I’m so in love with you...I know we will be together for as long as there is togetherness...” Linda makes parole on August 20th, 1976 and moves back to New Orleans. “November 9th, 1976. I’ve been free for 2 months now - and managed to get arrested but it's taken care of already - I’m working at the grog full time and about ready to go to school...” The entries after she leaves prison are mostly filled with updates about her life, the ups and downs of new relationships, and reflections on prison, it's good and bad sides. “There is one thing that I miss about being in the joint and that is that sometimes feeling of being alone. ...that getting away from other people's - voices and spend some time in your own head - It's as tho sometimes I feel I have to listen when someone is speaking.” The diary continues until June, 1979. The cover and spine are in somewhat rough shape structurally and much of the pages are at least partially detached from the spine. The pages within contain some age-toning, especially near the front and back of the book, but nothing that obscures the content. The handwriting is clear and concise throughout, in mostly pencil, with black, red and blue ink used as well. OVERALL: G.

Title: 1974 - 1979 ORIGINAL UNIQUE DIARY HANDWRITTEN BY A YOUNG FEMALE CRIMINAL, DETAILING THE HARDSHIPS, ROMANCES, AND UNCERTAINTIES OF PRISON, AND THE STRANGENESS OF ADJUSTING BACK TO LIFE AFTER JAIL

Author Name: LINDA M. GOUDEAU

Categories: Books and Manuscripts General Overview, 20th Century Diary, 20th Century Manuscript,

Publisher: ANCHORAGE to the CALIFORNIA INSTITUE FOR WOMEN, 1974

Book Condition: Good

Type: Manuscript

Size: 16mo - over 5¾" - 6¾" tall

Seller ID: 0009147

Keywords: KEYWORDS: HISTORY OF, LINDA M. GOUDEAU, WOMEN CRIMINALS, EAGLE RIVER, FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BANK ROBBER, ANCHORAGE, ALASKA, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN, CORRECTIONAL FACILITY, PRISON JOURNAL, WOMEN IN JAIL, PRISON RIOTS, NEW CIRCUMSTANCES, INCARCERATION OF WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES, LOVE AND RELATIONSHIPS IN PRISON, AMERICANA, HANDWRITTEN, MANUSCRIPT, DOCUMENT, LETTER, AUTOGRAPH, WRITER, HAND WRITTEN, DOCUMENTS, SIGNED, LETTERS, MANUSCRIPTS, HISTORICAL, HOLOGRAPH, KEEPSAKE WRITERS, AUTOGRAPHS, PERSONAL, MEMOIR, MEMORIAL, ARCHIVE, DIARY, DIARIES, JOURNAL, LOG, ANTIQUITÉ, CONTRAT, VÉLIN, DOCUMENT, MANUSCRIT, PAPIER ANTIKE, BRIEF, PERGAMENT, DOKUMENT, MANUSKRIPT, PAPIER OGGETTO D’ANTIQUARIATO, ATTO, VELINA, DOCUMENTO, MANUSCRITTO, CARTA ANTIGÜEDAD, HECHO, VITELA, DOCUMENTO, MANUSCRITO, PAPEL