1863 - 1864 ORIGINAL GROUP OF FOUR [4] MANUSCRIPT LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A PAY CLERK IN THE UNION ARMY WITH A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE FROM HIS OFFICES IN BALTIMORE AND IN THE FIELD FOLLOWING THE TROOPS TO BATTLE

By: GEORGE W. FERNALD

Price: $2,455.99

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Good


On offer is a super group of four [4] original Civil War era manuscript letters handwritten by George W. Fernald, a clerk in the pay Department of the U.S. Army. George was in Company "C" 2nd New York Militia or the 82nd New York Vols. His letters, dated December 1863 through to August 1864 are all on stationery of the Pay Department, U.S. Army, Baltimore, Maryland where he is stationed and refers to as home to his cousin whom he addresses in all his letters, make for a fascinating blend of homey family chit chat and significant Civil War narrative from a man with a number of interesting, dual perspectives being a Northerner working and living in a border state. He is as a clerk, not a fighter, and particularly well placed in Baltimore within the seat of Union Command and also to follow troops sometimes to battles to serve the soldiers. Here are some snippets and observations: Letter dated December 19, 1863: George is hoping to be in New York for Christmas and New Years, but that didn't happen. He also mentions trying to make a "Union" lady out of a "Secesh" lady. He writes about reading that the Union had recaptured the "Chesapeake", but that most of the "pirates" had escaped, and wishing those that get caught get hanged for the cold blooded murder in shooting the steamer's engineer. Also writes about a fire that destroyed two houses at the foot of Ann Street. Dated August 18 1864: He was delayed in answering his cousin's last letter, as he was out in the field with Sheridan's Army paying off the troops. He also writes that he has seen many grand sights since he joined the Army, both in marches and battles. He says he saw one that surpassed them all, when Sheridan's Army crossed the Potomac in two places, with one column fording the river and the other crossing on a pontoon bridge, and that as soon as a Brigade crossed, the band would strike up with a "National Air". Also impressive is that while the band was playing, bayonets would be glistening in the sun. Says he got a glass from the Signal Corps on Maryland Heights [near Harpers Ferry] and followed the troops as far as Kelleys Ford on the Shenandoah. Also says he feels inspired to re-enlist, depending on what the Doc says. Dated December 30, 1863 mentions him being stuck at camp for Christmas, as the Major and bookkeeper left for the holidays. He also mentions the effect and casualties of smallpox which has been in the area and pond skating. Notes the differences between Baltimore and New York: 'on Christmas…I made 15 calls through the day which I think was doing pretty good and not to get tight. They celebrate Christmas hear [sic] instead of new years as you do in New York.' A northern boy who yearns for a cold winter so he can skate on the ponds local ponds that might freeze over too small to have a good skate. Dated August 28, 1864 mentions boat races and going to the Maryland Institute with his cousin harry. There they saw the great trapeze artist of his time, Morris Vernecks (?), preform some of his amazing acts. George compared him to Blondin who crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope. Also as most of the letters there is more on the War: 'The rebels are reported advancing on Maryland & Pa. but I do not put much truth in it again for it is only a rumor. I am pleased to hear from the ship Vision [a very small ship rigged yawl attempting a cross Atlantic voyage]…' and much more. Some few splits in some folds overall G.

Title: 1863 - 1864 ORIGINAL GROUP OF FOUR [4] MANUSCRIPT LETTERS HANDWRITTEN BY A PAY CLERK IN THE UNION ARMY WITH A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE FROM HIS OFFICES IN BALTIMORE AND IN THE FIELD FOLLOWING THE TROOPS TO BATTLE

Author Name: GEORGE W. FERNALD

Categories: Books and Manuscripts General Overview, 19th Century Manuscript, 19th Century Ephemera,

Publisher: BALTIMORE MARYLAND MD, 1863

Book Condition: Good

Type: Manuscript

Size: 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall

Seller ID: 0002409

Keywords: KEYWORDS: HISTORY OF, GEORGE W. FERNALD, DEPARTMENT OF THE U.S. ARMY, COMPANY "C". 2ND NEW YORK MILITIA, 82ND NEW YORK VOLS, CIVIL WAR ERA, PAY DEPARTMENT, U.S. ARMY, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, BORDER STATES, SLAVE STATES, ANTI-SECESSION STATES, SOUTHERN AMERICANA,HANDWRITTEN, HANDWRITTEN, MANUSCRIPT, AUTOGRAPHED, AUTHORS, DOCUMENT, LETTER, AUTOGRAPH, KEEPSAKE, WRITER, HAND WRITTEN, DOCUMENTS, SIGNED, LETTERS, MANUSCRIPTS, HISTORICAL, HOLOGRAPH, WRITERS, AUTOGRAPHS, PERSONAL, MEMOIR, MEMORIAL, PERSONAL HISTORY, ARCHIVE, DIARY, DIARIES, JOURNAL, LOG, PRIMARY SOURCE, FIRST HAND ACCOUNT, SOCIAL HISTORY, PERSONAL STORIES, LIVING HISTORY, ANTIQUITÉ, CONTRAT, VÉLIN, DOCUMENT, MANUSCRIT, PAPIER ANTIKE, BRIEF, PERGAMENT, DOKUMENT, MANUSKRIPT, PAPIER OGGETTO D'ANTIQUARIATO, ATTO, VELINA, DOCUMENTO, MANOSCRITTO, CARTA ANTIGÜEDAD, HECHO, VITELA, DOCUMENTO, MANUSCRITO, PAPEL,BIOGRAPHY BIOGRAPHICAL AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY PERSONAL NARRATIVES