1850 ORIGINAL, HISTORIC MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY A GREATLY RELIEVED FATHER THAT HIS DAUGHTER SURVIVED THE DEVASTATION OF THE BELLE OF THE WEST DISASTER

By: ISSAC DAVEY

Price: $2,055.99

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Good


On offer is a superb piece of original correspondence from the mid-1800s in America. This 3-page letter measures 9.5 inches by 7.5 inches and is in excellent condition. The handwriting is very neat and quite legible. The author of the letter is Issac Davey, a businessman from Cincinnati, OH. The letter is written in May, 1850 to his daughter, Elizabeth. Davey was born in the early 1800s. Records indicate that he owned a clothing store in Cincinnati. He passed away in 1864. The letter to his daughter reflects his concern for her well-being and relief at knowing she escaped a major tragedy of the time. The Belle of the West was a steam-powered riverboat that plied the inland waterways of the Mississippi Valley. On Apr 22nd, 1850, her boilers exploded during the night and the ship caught fire. Despite being run aground, dozens of passengers lost their lives. The Cincinnati Chronicle reported the story: on Apr 23rd, 1850: The public ear was startled yesterday morning by the painful rumor that the steamer Belle of the West had caught fire, and had been consumed on her way to St. Louis, and that some FIFTY OR SIXTY unfortunate passengers had perished in the flames! Subsequent accounts proved that the painful report was but too true. It appears from the account of those who returned to the city yesterday, the Belle of the West left here on Monday afternoon for St. Louis, having on board between two and three hundred passengers, among whom were a large company of emigrants on their way to California. At midnight, but two miles from Warsaw, and about sixty two miles from this city, smoke was seen issuing from the hatchway and it was discovered that he boat was on fire. At first, the officers endeavored to suppress the flame without alarming the passengers; but when their efforts were found to be of no avail, the pilot was directed to run the boat ashore, and the passengers were aroused from their sleep and warned of their immediate peril. The scene that ensued beggars description. Passengers were seen hurrying wildly through the smoke in their nightclothes - many of them delirious with excitement, and not a few leaping hopelessly into the water, to escape the threatening danger of the flames. The boat was finally run ashore, enveloped in flames, and the passengers thus afforded escape from the awful peril that surrounded them. How many perished it is now impossible to say. The accounts represent the number as high as sixty. It is to be hoped, however that this number is largely exaggerated. Elizabeth Davey was on board the Belle of the West when this occurred. Her father writes about his relief that she is safe. Note that his spelling is phonetic as was not unusual at that time. Some spelling corrections have been included to aid clarity: My Dear Daughter, I received your letter I think on the eighth and was happy to hear of your safe arrival in Bellevill and was happy to hear of your provedenced (providenced) escape. We heard of the loss of the Bel of the West and the meny (many) soles (souls) that was hered (herded) into eterenty (eternity). Truly do we realize the truth of Gods word that in the medest (midst) of life we are in death…..I thank God for amerseful (a merciful) providence. ... [p 1] You want to know something about your friends. They ware uneasey about you. Some came to enquire, others ware afraid to come. They had it reported you was on the bernt (burnt) boat.... [p 3] Ameleya Walter says she wants to see you very bad. Shee says shee must wright you to come home. She says the place looks very lonesome without you. Mrs. Elsener said shee was afraid to come fearing the report to be true ... [p 3] His ending is very simple and clearly heartfelt: I reman (remain) your afecencate (affectionate) father until death, Isaac Davey. [p 3] Most interesting is the note added to the letter. It is by Elizabeth herself Yes my dear father I will meet you God being my helper where sorrow never dims the eye and parting is unknown. Glory to God, never part again. Happy day. Elizabeth [p3] This is a rare historical document about a widely-reported tragedy. For a historian, Davey's words bring immediacy to the event and a reader can feel the emotion he must have experienced as he wrote it. His daughter's words penned to the end of the letter really bring this document to life.; Manuscript; 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall; KEYWORDS: HISTORY OF, ISSAC DAVEY; ELIZABETH DAVEY; CINCINNATI, OHIO; BELLE OF THE WEST; STEAMBOAT EXPLOSION; THE BUCKEYE STATE, STEAM-POWERED RIVERBOAT, MISSISSIPPI VALLEY, ANTE BELLUM ERA, PRE CIVIL WAR, AMERICANA, HANDWRITTEN, MANUSCRIPT, DOCUMENT, LETTER, AUTOGRAPH, WRITER, HAND WRITTEN, DOCUMENTS, SIGNED, LETTERS, MANUSCRIPTS, DIARY, DIARIES, JOURNALS, PERSONAL HISTORY, SOCIAL HISTORY, HISTORICAL, HOLOGRAPH, WRITERS, AUTOGRAPHS, PERSONAL, MEMOIR, MEMORIAL, ANTIQUITÉ, CONTRAT, VÉLIN, DOCUMENT, MANUSCRIT, PAPIER ANTIKE, BRIEF, PERGAMENT, DOKUMENT, MANUSKRIPT, PAPIER OGGETTO D'ANTIQUARIATO, ATTO, VELINA, DOCUMENTO, MANOSCRITTO, CARTA ANTIGÜEDAD, HECHO, VITELA, DOCUMENTO, MANUSCRITO, PAPEL

Title: 1850 ORIGINAL, HISTORIC MANUSCRIPT LETTER HANDWRITTEN BY A GREATLY RELIEVED FATHER THAT HIS DAUGHTER SURVIVED THE DEVASTATION OF THE BELLE OF THE WEST DISASTER

Author Name: ISSAC DAVEY

Categories: 19th Century Manuscript, Books and Manuscripts General Overview, All, 19th Century Ephemera,

Publisher: CINCINNATI [CINCINATTA] OHIO MISSISSIPPI VALLEY, 1850

Book Condition: Good

Seller ID: 0007032

Keywords: Keywords: History Of Issac Davey; Elizabeth Davey; Cincinnati Ohio; Belle Of The West; Steamboat Explosion; The Buckeye State Steam-Powered Riverboat Mississippi Valley Ante Bellum Era Pre Civil War AMERICANA HANDWRITTEN